LBBW Sustainability

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LBBW Sustainability
With 2015 Consolidated Environmental Statement.
Globe
Invented by Martin Behaim
Germany, 1492
Overview. Made in Germany.
Sustainability Report 2015.
Landesbank Baden-Württemberg
SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2015
Growing Responsibly.
Economic conditions are difficult. We can be satisfied with our Bank’s performance in this challenging environment. Today, we are a purely customerdriven bank with a successful business model. For
us, sustainability forms a crucial basis for our future viability. It constitutes an integral part of our
corporate strategy and our business policy.
2015
Sustainability Report with 2015 Consolidated
Environmental Statement.
About This Report ................................................................................................... 4
Strategy and Management
....................................................................
5
Foreword by Hans-Jörg Vetter ................................................................................................................. 6
The Company ................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Sustainability Strategy and Management ............................................................................ 11
Stakeholder Communication ................................................................................................................. 37
Sustainability Ratings, Awards and Memberships ................................................. 40
Binding Standards ................................................................................................................................................. 46
Responsibility and Commitment
.....................................
57
Customers ......................................................................................................................................................................... 58
Employees ......................................................................................................................................................................... 76
Society .................................................................................................................................................................................... 99
Environment ............................................................................................................................................................... 106
GRI G4 Index ............................................................................................................... 130
Audit Opinion
..........................................................................................................
Publishing Information
.....................................................................
134
137
The sections and sub-sections designated »ES« in this Report are
part of LBBW’s Updated 2015 Consolidated Environment Statement.
The Company .................................................................................................................................................................. 9
Sustainability Policy ........................................................................................................................................... 11
Sustainability Goals and Operational Guidelines ................................................... 13
Sustainability Activities ................................................................................................................................ 21
Sustainability Program ................................................................................................................................. 29
Stakeholder Communication ................................................................................................................. 37
Sustainability Ratings, Awards and Memberships ............................................... 40
Scope of Applicability and EMAS Certification ......................................................... 46
Supplier Management ..................................................................................................................................... 47
Sustainable Products, Sustainable Action ......................................................................... 61
LBBW Improvement Process .................................................................................................................. 95
Environment .............................................................................................................................................................. 106
ABOUT THIS REPORT
About This Report.
Reporting Period
The LBBW Sustainability Report 2015 covers the period
from 1 September 2014 to 31 August 2015. The time
series for environmental data generally refers to the
calendar years from 2010 to 2014. LBBW’s previous
Sustainability Report was published on 24 October
2014. The next Environmental Statement will be published in October 2016 at the latest.
Report Content
The topics covered by this Report are based on the
G4 Guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative,
GRI (»In accordance with« – core).
Scope of Reporting
Our sustainability management system is applicable to
LBBW (Bank) (including BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz
Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank) and the wholly owned
subsidiaries LBBW GastroEvent GmbH, LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH (including integrated company BW Immobilien GmbH) and LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH. The Sustainability
Report therefore covers this part of the LBBW Group.
4
Materiality Analysis
In November 2014 we conducted a materiality analysis
for LBBW (Bank) including BW-Bank, LBBW RheinlandPfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank. This materiality
analysis, in which LBBW employees participated, formulates the expectations which the stakeholders have
of LBBW from the participants’ point of view. Looking
forward over the next few months and years, we will
be additionally analyzing the results of the workshops
with the individual stakeholder groups in order to optimize step by step the activities and the evaluation of
the measures taken. In a preliminary step, we will be
conducting talks with private customers in this connection. Further information on the results of the materiality analysis can be found on p. 26 ff.
Editorial Notes
All of the information in this Report was compiled
with the utmost care. To the best of our knowledge,
this information and data are correct. Nonetheless, no
liability can be assumed for the correctness or completeness of the information provided. We would like
to thank the numerous colleagues who participated in
preparing this Report for their support.
Strategy and Management.
Consistent Management.
As a Landesbank, we are responsible for the future
of our region. We aim to work toward the stability of
companies and the economy here, while at the same
time actively contributing to the well-being of both
society and the environment. Our sustainability goals
guide us along this path, and we measure our performance by how systematically we can achieve them.
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Over the last five years we
have placed our commitment to
sustainability on a professional
footing step by step, anchoring
it firmly in our core business.
HANS-JÖRG VETTER
Hans-Jörg Vetter, Chairman of the Board
of Managing Directors of Landesbank
Baden-Württemberg.
6
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Dear Customers,
Dear Business Partners of the LBBW Group,
Dear Readers,
LBBW has been attaching key importance to sustainability for more than two decades. Over the last five
years we have placed our commitment to sustainability
on a professional footing step by step, anchoring it
firmly in our core business. Our Guidelines for Stability
provide our employees with a concrete and binding
framework for their day-to-day activities. In addition to
good corporate governance, we are increasingly also
paying attention to environmental and social aspects
in connection with our investment products. Similarly,
we take account of sustainability aspects in the lending business within a defined scope and encourage an
active focus on transactions, projects, products and
customer groups with a positive impact on the Bank’s
sustainability balance sheet.
Overall, we were once again evaluated very favorably
by the sustainability rating agencies in the reporting
period. In the Sustainalytics analysis, LBBW ranked
18th out of a total of 410 rated banks in the international banks category. This is the second best ranking
achieved by a German financial institution (as at July
2015). Munich-based oekom AG also places us in the
international top 5 out of 84 rated banks (as at June
2015). These good results have confirmed us in our
approach. We will be continuing on this course out of
a sense of conviction despite and, indeed, precisely in
view of the persistently challenging and dynamically
changing conditions facing our industry.
For one thing, the mounting regulatory requirements
in the banking industry are exerting a strain on our
operating business and causing considerable costs;
for another, corporate and retail customer business is
exposed to heavy competition, which is not least of
all being driven by the ongoing challenges posed by
low interest rates. Despite this, we are able to post
continuously growing earnings thanks to our decision
to concentrate on long-term business relations which
are reliable for both sides. We have consistently closed
each quarter with a profit over the last three-and-a-half
years. What is more, rating agencies Fitch and Moody’s
see us as being well-positioned in the German banking
market. LBBW currently has a long-term Fitch rating of
A- while in June Moody’s upgraded its rating by one
notch in this category to A1. Our aim is to retain this
course and to continue growing on a selective and
consistently risk-conscious basis against this challenging backdrop. At the same time, we continue to view
business activities not solely in economic terms. It is
not least of all for this reason that our sustainability
policy forms an integral part of our corporate strategy
and business policy.
In our customer business, we attach particular importance to fair and responsible relations. We take an
integrated approach to advice, focusing on the individual requirements of each customer. Our sustainable
approach to advice and the rules for systematic implementation and review are set out in the »Leitlinien für
die Privatkundenberatung in der BW-Bank« (Guidelines
for Retail Customer Advice at BW-Bank).
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Our Quality Management Department regularly monitors the quality of advice. We are always happy to
receive suggestions from our customers, which we
incorporate in our continuous improvement process.
On the following pages, you will find specific examples of our sustainable activities and the related products and services offered by our Bank.
Sustainability management also plays an important
role in our human resources policy; one example is
last year’s special mentoring program for women seeking an executive position, which found a favorable
response. Since we particularly view gender diversity
as an opportunity for tying expertise to our Company
and for leveraging it, we want to increase the proportion of women in management positions.
For example, we are happy to advise our retail customers on the BW ZukunftsSparbrief savings bond, which
specifically supports the funding of sustainable projects. Launched last year, the pilot project has met
with a favorable customer response, generating
proceeds which we use to finance loans for energyefficient construction and renovation.
Finally, I am personally very pleased that many of our
active employees took part in the »Salary Cent« initiative launched in February 2015. Under this scheme,
participants donate the cent amount of their monthly
net salary for social projects. The Bank then rounds
up the amount collected from the cent donations by
making an additional donation itself.
For some time now, we have also been offering institutional investors »covered bonds with sustainable added value«, i. e. the cover stock is selected on the basis
of ecological, social and societal criteria. As well as this,
we underwrote the issue of a »green« covered bond in
April of this year. The proceeds from this issue were
used solely to fund sustainable investment projects.
If you have any further suggestions, please send them
to [email protected] We hope that you will find
this report full of useful information.
Sincerely,
HANS-JÖRG VETTER
Chairman of the Board of Managing Directors of Landesbank
Baden-Württemberg
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
The Company.
Landesbank Baden-Württemberg (LBBW) is a universal bank
combining the services of a major credit institution with regional
proximity to its customers. It is a bank for retail and corporate
customers. At the same time, it is the central clearing bank for the
savings banks in its home markets in the German states of BadenWürttemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saxony. With total assets of
EUR 279 billion and around 11,100 employees (as at 30 June 2015),
LBBW is one of the largest German banks and the most important
by a wide margin in its core market of Baden-Württemberg. LBBW
provides all of the products and services typical of a modern fullservice bank in around 200 branches and offices across Germany.
In its core markets as well as in neighboring economic
areas, LBBW is represented by non-independent banking entities doing business under their own name:
■
■
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In Baden-Württemberg and the neighboring state of
Bavaria, Baden-Württembergische Bank (BW-Bank)
takes on this function. The areas of business are
retail and corporate customer business. In addition,
BW-Bank operates as a Stadtsparkasse (municipal
savings bank) in the territory the state capital
Stuttgart.
The focus of LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank is on SME
business in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate as well
the neighboring economic areas of Hesse and North
Rhine-Westphalia.
LBBW bundles its small and medium-sized corporate
and retail customer business in Saxony and the
neighboring regions under the umbrella of LBBW
Sachsen Bank.
In order to emphasize more clearly the fact that the
two non-independent banks in Rhineland-Palatinate
and Saxony are part of LBBW, their brand logo and
language usage were changed at the beginning of the
year and now include the prefix »LBBW«.
Business with large customers with national or
international operations, real estate financing, capital
markets business and the role of central bank for the
savings banks in Baden-Württemberg, RhinelandPalatinate and Saxony are pooled at LBBW. LBBW also
supports the corporate customers of LBBW and of the
savings banks in their international activities. A worldwide network of branches in New York, London, Singapore and Seoul as well as representative offices in
Dubai, Hanoi, Istanbul, Jakarta, Mexico City, Moscow,
Mumbai, Beijing, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, Tashkent,
Tokyo, Vienna und Zurich offer customers local expertise, market insights and financial solutions. Moreover,
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
LBBW operates German Centers in Beijing, Singapore,
Mexico City, Delhi.Gurgaon and Moscow that advise
German corporate customers on entering national
markets and make local office space and networks
available to them.
able to post further growth in earnings. In 2014,
LBBW’s consolidated earnings climbed from EUR 339
million to EUR 434 million, with post-tax earnings in
the first half of 2015 rising from EUR 153 million to
EUR 182 million.
Subsidiaries specializing in activities such as leasing,
factoring, asset management, real estate and private
equity supplement the LBBW Group’s own range of
services.
In its business activities, LBBW concentrates on selective and risk-conscious growth, for example, by acquiring the custodian account activities of Nord/LB. At the
same time, the Bank has widened its international network with the establishment of two new representative
offices in Turkey and Uzbekistan. This has raised the
total number of the Bank’s foreign branches and offices
to 19. The representative offices are available to LBBW’s
customers and those of the German savings banks.
As a public-law entity with full legal capacity, LBBW has
the following shareholders (owners):
■ Sparkassenverband Baden-Württemberg (the
Savings Bank Association of Baden-Württemberg)
■ the State of Baden-Württemberg
■ the state capital Stuttgart
■ Landesbeteiligungen Baden-Württemberg GmbH
■ Landeskreditbank Baden-Württemberg Förderbank
(L-Bank).
An extensive overview of the company is provided at
www.LBBW.de/en. This site also contains information
on our ownership structure and legal form as well as
our activities, business areas and the states in which
we do business.
Current Developments.
In the reporting period, LBBW continued to operate in
what were difficult conditions for banks characterized
by intense competition, historically low interest rates
and persistently heavy regulation. Despite this, it was
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With its customer-oriented business model, LBBW
considers itself to be well-positioned for the future.
It will be using the good market position which it has
achieved following the successful completion of restructuring to leverage opportunities as they arise.
At the annual general meeting in May, regular elections were held for 21 seats on the Supervisory Board.
Furthermore, the number of independent members of
the Supervisory Board was increased from seven to a
total of eight – including the Chairman of the Supervisory Board – at the beginning of the next period of
office. Accordingly, the independent members of the
Supervisory Board now account for more than onethird of the total number. 14 members were nominated
by the shareholders. The seven employee representatives had been elected by the Bank’s staff a few weeks
earlier.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Sustainability Strategy
and Management.
We have anchored our commitment to sustainability firmly in
our strategy, as well as in our business operations. The Group’s sustainability goals, the climate strategy and concrete guidelines for
the investment and lending business, human resources policy and
business operations provide mandatory guidance for responsible
action by each individual, thus creating the foundation for consistently sustainable corporate governance in all areas of the business.
LBBW Mission Statement.
Sustainability Policy.
LBBW has adopted a Bank-wide Mission Statement
comprising a set of rules governing our collective work
and actions. Our commitment to sustainability is documented in our Mission Statement: As a company with
regional roots, we are committed to fulfilling our responsibilities. We do business in an environmentally
friendly manner and advocate social issues.
LBBW’s Sustainability Policy consolidates LBBW’s Guiding Principles on Sustainable Development in the areas
of corporate governance, business operations, human
resources, communications and LBBW’s commitment
to community.
It stipulates the framework for all sustainability activities at LBBW and is the foundation for integrating
economic, environmental and social issues into our
business activities as a whole.
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Corporate Governance
■ Landesbank Baden-Württemberg acts in the longterm best interests of the Bank, its customers and
other stakeholders. Our activities aim to consistently
contribute to sustainable and balanced economic,
environmental and social development.
■ The key conditions required for business activities
geared to sustainability issues have been put into
place thanks to the Guidelines for Sustainability.
They provide our executive staff and employees
with concrete guidance for the operational implementation of LBBW’s sustainability goals, which are
contained in the Guidelines.
■ We endeavor to use our sustainability management
system to put into practice sustainable thought and
action throughout the Bank, in all specialized divisions, subsidiaries and branches, and therefore to
continually improve LBBW’s sustainability balance
sheet.
■ We consider our commitment to sustainable development to be an integral part of our mission to
serve the common good, which we believe strongly
is our responsibility as a public-sector institution.
■ It goes without saying that we will comply with all
applicable legal regulations, as well as uphold the
human rights defined by the United Nations.
Business Operations
In terms of our stewardship of resources, we consider
ourselves responsible for future generations and
therefore work hard to continuously minimize our
use of non-renewable resources.
■ We give preference to sustainable products and sustainability-focused suppliers and service providers
in our purchasing and procurement processes wherever this is an economically viable option.
■
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Core Business/Banking Products
We are well aware of the importance of banks as
financing partners for innovative, climate-friendly
technologies and industries. LBBW is therefore in
favor of actively orienting lending and investment
activities toward sustainable projects, products and
customers.
■
Human Resources
We sustainably promote and develop our staff
resources so that we are well-prepared for future
challenges with a team of motivated, qualified and
healthy employees.
■ We include all LBBW employees in implementing
sustainability concepts. Executives are ultimately
responsible and act as role models in this process.
■
Communications
■ LBBW reports regularly on the progress made in
fulfilling its sustainability commitment.
■ We see ourselves as a partner to our customers.
This vision includes our desire to increasingly share
our knowledge of sustainable corporate governance.
In this way, we support our customers in strengthening their commitment to sustainable development
and reducing environmental pollution.
Social Commitment
We take our responsibility to society seriously. LBBW
operates three foundations that promote projects
and initiatives in the fields of nature/the environment, education and art and culture. As a donor
and sponsor, LBBW supports projects with substantial
value-added for the public in many ways.
■
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Sustainability Goals and
Operational Guidelines.
In order to put the sustainability policy in
concrete terms, LBBW has defined the following
umbrella goals:
1. We want to gradually implement sustainability as an
integral component of our business policy. For this
reason, we are expressly committed to also increasingly addressing ecological, social and societal
issues in investment decision-making processes
going forward.
2. We will offer sustainable investment products to
all customer groups and in all asset classes to the
greatest extent possible. The goal is to increase the
share of sustainable investments in all business
areas – including in our own investment portfolio.
3. In credit advising and credit decision-making,
we will take into account sustainability risks and
earning potential for customers and the Bank.
4. We strive for an active focus on projects, products
and customers with a positive impact on the sustainability balance sheet of the Bank. Thus, we
promote environmentally friendly technologies and
contribute to the reduction of CO2 emissions.
5. LBBW is a reliable partner to its employees. Our
goal in the future is to be an even more attractive
employer than today. To this end, we are continuously
working toward improving our work organization
and working conditions with a view to improving
the health and work-life balance of our employees.
We intend to maintain and further raise the high
education and training level in our Bank.
6. We will further optimize the use of resources within
our organization. We will focus on exploiting any
potential for reducing CO2 emissions, especially in
energy and paper usage and business travel.
7. We apply uniform criteria in selecting products and
services when procuring materials and awarding
contracts which ensure that the relevant sustainability
issues are included in the decision-making process.
The projects agreed for the purpose of achieving
sustainability goals are listed in the Sustainability
Program (see p. 29 ff.).
The concrete orientation framework for the implementation of LBBW’s sustainability goals is provided by the
Guidelines for Sustainability. These mark out the corridor within which LBBW will pursue its sustainability
goals in the investment and lending business, in human
resources policy and in stewardship of resources, and
therefore form the foundation for sustainable development. As part of the international community, we are
committed to the human rights defined by the United
Nations. Consequently, we attempt to avoid any relations with companies or institutions that we know fail
to observe fundamental human rights.
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Guidelines for Sustainable Investment
In the future, LBBW will strive to more strongly emphasize environmental, social and ethical issues in its
investment business. The objective is to offer our
customers sustainable investments in all asset classes,
if possible.
Among other things, we apply the United Nations’
Principles for Responsible Investment (www.unpri.org)
in making investment decisions.
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We will support businesses and corporations in
which we invest as active shareholders. We will
urge them to provide transparent information
about all ESG factors. If we identify any violation
of our basic values, we will enter into an intensive dialog with the companies concerned.
The principles that guide our Bank should also
serve as a compass for the entire industry. We
will therefore work toward greater acceptance
and implementation of the PRI (Principles for Responsible Investment) in the investment industry.
Text of our Guidelines for Sustainability
»Investment Business«
Going forward, we will take more and more ESG
(environmental, social and corporate governance)
factors into account in our investment decisions. By
doing so, we act in the best and long-term interests
of our clients and stakeholders. When implementing
our sustainability targets, the Principles for Responsible Investment of the United Nations (PRI) serve
as a benchmark.
We therefore commit to the following, as far as this
is compatible with our responsibility vis-à-vis the
customer:
■ We will integrate ESG-related topics into the analytical and decision-making processes in investment banking and will actively promote sustainable investments. In our business with customers
we will offer sustainable investment products
for all customer groups and in all asset classes,
provided that investment opportunities are available that meet the criteria for other products
and services offered to customers. The goal is
to increase the share of sustainable investments
in all business areas – including in our own
investment portfolio.
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Guidelines for Sustainable Financing
Identifying, avoiding and managing risks that could
arise from financing transactions are key elements in
making lending decisions. Analyzing non-monetary
risks, such as reputation risks, through an environmental or social lens is becoming increasingly important.
We make a concerted effort to finance projects that
support sustainable development as well as hold business opportunities for LBBW. Consequently, investment
finance for energy infrastructure, e. g. electricity grids
and storage, will grow in importance.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Text of LBBW’s Guidelines for Sustainability
»Financing»
Addressing sustainability concerns also plays a
major role in financing decisions. For instance,
questionable environmental and social conditions
harbor serious risks that could endanger our
reputation and standing.
For the lending business, this means:
■ We will reinforce our advisory competence with
the aim of identifying risks early on in conjunction with the customer in order to take countermeasures. This open relationship between the
advisor and customer promotes sustainable business development, the business relationship and
the systematic identification of earning potential
for the Bank.
■ We actively focus on transactions, projects, products and customer groups with a positive impact
on the Bank’s sustainability balance sheet. This
enables us to spur the development and the
dissemination of environmentally friendly technologies. In turn, we help reduce carbon dioxide
emissions, for example. At the same time, we are
able to build a future-proof customer portfolio
(asset allocation) by specifically leveraging the
strong market growth in these segments in our
favor. All in all, these measures will make our
Bank more sustainable.
■
We implement tools for identifying, avoiding
and managing sustainability risks in certain industries and countries in the analytical and decision-making process. This applies in particular
to environmental protection, human rights and
working conditions. The sustainability evaluation
which forms an integral part of the analytical
and decision-making process provides us with
a holistic view of risk.
Guidelines for Sustainability in Human Resources
Management
We want to be an attractive employer and a reliable
partner to our employees. Knowing that capable and
committed employees are the most important factor
for the success of any company, we invest in the health
of our employees, build their skills with specialized
personnel development measures and offer them a
number of programs aimed at attaining a positive
work-life balance. We support our employees in all
phases of their lives, such as child care or care for
family members. We aim to attract outstanding talent
and retain staff for the long term. Providing professional training to young people in particular is something we consider an important sociopolitical and
company mission – one which LBBW gladly undertakes.
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Text of LBBW’s Guidelines for Sustainability
»Human Resources Management«
The 12 »HPI value drivers« defined by the Federal
Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs in the Human
Potential Index (HPI) determine the Guidelines for
Sustainability in Human Resources Management
within the LBBW Group. In the following, these HPI
value drivers are ranked according to their effectiveness for corporate performance and formulated
explicitly for the LBBW Group as prerequisites for
sustainable human resources management policy:
1. Compensation and Benefits
We provide an up-to-date, complete remuneration system in which salary components can
be structured flexibly. Attractive social benefits
effectively express our appreciation of our employees.
2. Change Management
We strive to continuously improve working
conditions and organization, thus enhancing
our attractiveness as an employer. Employee
co-determination is respected and supported.
3. Work-Life Balance
We exercise our duty of care as an employer
and voluntarily commit to offering our employees
a sustainable work-life balance.
4. Communication and Information
Our employees can only work successfully for
the Bank based on good communication and
information exchange. This is the condition
required for the Bank to operate profitably
and responsibly in the long run.
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5. Leadership
In return for their efforts, employees receive
appreciation and respect from their managers.
They can be proud of their Bank, its products,
its services and its leadership culture.
6. Personnel Development
We strive to maintain our training and continuing
education measures at a high level in terms of
quality.
7. Human Resources Planning and Selection
Our human resources planning is aimed at retaining employees for the long term. Avoiding
business-related layoffs is a primary objective.
8. Employee Retention
Once an employee is on board, we stand by
him/her.
9. Demographic Developments
Our organizational structure is tailored to the
age breakdown of our employees and demographic developments.
10. Promoting Health
Professional in-house healthcare management
allows us to keep our employees healthy, motivated and productive for the long term.
11. Human Resources Management
It goes without saying that we ensure confidentiality and data protection, including with regard
to performance reviews.
12. Equal Opportunity and Diversity
We aim to increase the percentage of women
in executive positions. We see diversity as an
opportunity and have therefore signed the
Diversity Charter for companies in Germany.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Resources
We have laid down binding criteria for the procurement of products and services that expressly include
environmental and social factors. These criteria are
taken into consideration when contracts are awarded
(see Supplier Management, p. 47 ff.).
■
The standards that we apply to LBBW’s own use of
resources are similarly stringent. We plan to continue
to steadily reduce carbon dioxide emissions, which
can result from business travel, facility management,
IT and the use of materials.
Text of LBBW’s Guidelines for Sustainability
»Business Operations«
We aim to manage our consumption of resources
to ensure that sufficient resources will be available
to future generations. In our efforts, we focus predominantly on cutting carbon dioxide emissions
and on our procurement policy.
Reduction of our carbon dioxide emissions is the
primary environmental objective in our business
operations. By purchasing green electricity, we already reduced our absolute CO2 emissions by 70 %
from 2006 to 2009. The next target is to further
cut our absolute CO2 emissions by 25 % by 2020,
based on 2009 figures and the current framework
conditions.
We aim to reduce our energy consumption by
optimizing our building systems and our IT
hardware in the data centers and the workplace.
This requires the development of appropriate
technical and organizational measures for the
following:
1. Long-term investment approach (leasing and
construction), including energy consumption
of buildings;
2. electricity usage by facility management in
kWh/employee;
3. heating energy consumption in kWh/m2;
4. electricity consumption of the data centers
in terms of productivity of mainframes and
server farms (IT PEW = IT productivity* per
embedded watt);
* The productivity parameters we use here are storage volume and
number of CPUs (central processing units).
■
■
5. workstation IT in relation to one standard
workstation (regular measuring in defined,
spatially confined areas) in kWh/workstation
and year.
We strive for optimization of the choice of
transportation in compliance with the guidelines
contained in the travel policy.
We want to maintain the high percentage of
recycled paper.
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STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
We have defined standardized criteria for selecting
products and services:
■ When placing an order, we consider sustainability
criteria (e. g. environment, regional economy/customer relationships), as stipulated by our procurement standards.
■ Environment, regional economy/customer relationships as well as fair compensation are key factors
for us when reviewing services and products/
materials. We strive to assign a weighting of 10 %
to these sustainability factors against other decision-making criteria (quality, price-performance
ratio, reliability, service, acceptance, framework
agreements).
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To ensure compliance with the sustainability
criteria, we require our suppliers to answer
questions with regard to product origin, the
manufacturing process, materials used etc.
Furthermore, we reserve a right to extraordinary
termination in the event of non-compliance with
our social standards, which all suppliers are
required to accept.
We meet our electricity needs with electricity
from renewable sources while keeping in mind
economic decision-making criteria.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Climate Strategy.
We aim to contribute actively to climate protection and
to promote low-emissions economic activity. For this
reason, LBBW has formulated its own climate strategy.
Text of LBBW’s Climate Strategy
Climate change is one of the greatest global challenges of the 21st century. Low-emissions and energyefficient technologies are already well-established
business areas for many industrial companies. They
are considered key growth drivers and leading
industries of the future in Germany. In our core
markets in particular, they offer substantial economic potential.
LBBW contributes actively to the transition from a
greenhouse-gas-intensive to a low-emissions way of
doing business. We built expertise at an early stage
in the future markets relevant to us, such as renewable energies, especially wind power and energy
efficiency, and offer related products and services
with growing market potential to our customers.
In addition, we are committed to operating our
business in a manner that is climate friendly, and
we therefore set ambitious climate protection goals.
By purchasing green electricity, we already reduced
our absolute CO2 emissions by 70 % between 2006
and 2009. The next target is to cut our absolute
CO2 emissions by a further 25 % by 2020, based on
2009 figures and the current framework conditions.
We have already anchored key strategic principles
regarding climate change in our »Guidelines for
Sustainability« both in our core business with customers as well as our internal business operations.
Since the decision was made to implement a climate
strategy in 2011, we have completed numerous projects to this end (see the sections on Customers,
p. 69 ff. and Environment, p. 106 ff.).
From 2009 to 2014, CO2 emissions were reduced by
more than 40 % by optimizing technologies and our
organization, among other measures (see p. 112 ff.).
19
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Sustainable Corporate
Governance.
LBBW ensures compliance with the Sustainability Policy
through consistent application of a sustainability management system, which covers all divisions and is being
implemented in a multi-stage process throughout
LBBW. The Chairman of the Board of Managing Directors of LBBW is responsible for the implementation.
Once a year, environmental management at LBBW is
evaluated by top-level management (management
review in accordance with ISO 14001). Key issues
relating to sustainability are presented to the Board
of Managing Directors for information or decisionmaking purposes. The Board of Managing Directors
in turn provides the Supervisory Board with regular,
timely and comprehensive information about key
developments at the Bank and the Group.
Leadership of our sustainability management efforts
rests with the head of the Corporate Sustainability and
Health department, who is also responsible for the environmental management system at LBBW. The Group’s
numerous sustainability activities are consolidated in
the Sustainability Program (see p. 29 ff.).
Independent internal and external environmental
audits ensure that the requirements for a certified
environmental management system are met.
LBBW Board of Managing Directors
LBBW Board of Managing Directors
Sustainability Committee at the 2nd level (division heads) and managing directors of key subsidiaries
Chairman: Chairman of the Board of Managing Directors of LBBW
Sustainability Group: Concept, Coordination, Management, Project Management
Sustainability Working Group
Spec. Div. 1
20
Spec. Div. 2
Spec. Div. 3
Working Groups
Spec. Div. 4
Spec. Div. 5
Spec. Div. 6
Spec. Div. 7
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Sustainability Activities.
Committees and Departments
The Sustainability Committee is the communications
bridge between the Board of Managing Directors and
the specialized divisions. This body consolidates and
drives the shaping of opinions within the Bank concerning strategic sustainability issues and prepares
information to enable the Board of Managing Directors
to make decisions. The head of the Sustainability
Committee is the Chairman of the Board of Managing
Directors. The members of the Committee are division
heads (2nd management level) with responsibility for
sustainability issues and the managing directors of key
subsidiaries.
The potential effects of our business activities on our
sustainability balance sheet are classified as »minimal«,
»average« or »significant«, depending on the materiality of the individual issues to LBBW’s sustainability
performance. The relevant focus areas are geared
toward our Sustainability Policy and the requirements
of our stakeholders.
This classification allows us to determine priorities for
further sustainability activities. Sustainability measures
can be identified primarily in the content areas in which
they have a substantial effect on our sustainability
balance sheet.
The Sustainability Working Group is made up of
the representatives of all of the relevant specialized
divisions. They work at the operations level and
coordinate all sustainability activities in the divisions.
Furthermore, they supervise the implementation of
agreed projects.
The Sustainability Group in the Corporate Sustainability and Health department coordinates and manages
all sustainability activities at LBBW, collects the relevant
data, prepares statements for rating inquiries, prepares
sustainability reporting and initiates the further development of LBBW’s Sustainability Policy and management.
21
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Analysis of Sustainability Issues in Our Business Activities.
LBBW Sustainability Policy
Corporate Governance
Business Operations
Core Business/Banking
Products
22
LBBW Focus Areas
LBBW Focus Issues
Effect on Our Sustainability
Balance Sheet
Corporate Governance
Transparency in business activities,
management structure, tax transparency,
creation of incentive systems for
implementing environmental issues,
social issues and responsible corporate
governance.
Average
Compliance
Internal and external fraud-prevention
efforts, embargos and financial sanctions,
anti-corruption measures, data protection,
corporate ethics.
Average
Resource use and CO2 emissions
Responsible use of resources (paper,
water, energy). Facility management,
hazardous materials, waste, vehicle fleet
management, sustainable business travel,
responsible construction of own buildings.
Average
Sustainable procurement
Integration of sustainability criteria in
supplier selection/evaluation and product
procurement, long-term cooperation with
suppliers based on trust.
Minimal
Sustainability standards in the financing
business (environment, social issues,
corporate governance)
Financing taking into account environmental protection, human rights, working
conditions, definition of exclusion criteria.
Significant
Sustainability standards in the investment
business (environment, social issues,
corporate governance)
Management of reputation risks in
business with customers and in proprietary investments, definition of exclusion
criteria.
Significant
Sustainable investment products
Offering sustainable investments
(e. g. investment funds, structured
products, sustainable asset management).
Significant
Financing with a sustainable focus
Promotion of climate-friendly projects
and technologies (e. g. renewable
energies, building renovation to improve
energy efficiency).
Significant
Payments, cards, accounts
Financial inclusion/access to financial
services for disadvantaged groups in
society, cards or accounts with sustainability themes.
Average
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Influence on Our Commitment
to Sustainability.
Making Our Commitment Measurable.
Macro Sustainability Issues and Influencing Laws
GRI Indicators
Selected More Detailed, Internal LBBW Parameters,
Internal Standards and Voluntary Commitments
Signed
Loss of confidence due to financial crisis, disclosure obligations.
G4-14 to G4-16,
G4-34 to G4-56
Fraud, compliance with generally applicable laws and with laws
concerning business, money laundering, German Banking Act (KWG),
German Securities Trading Act (WpHG).
G4-SO1, G4-SO3 to G4-SO8,
G4-PR9
Worldwide scarcity of raw materials and natural resources,
destruction of nature reserves and forests essential to life,
biodiversity and loss of species diversity, climate change.
G4-EN1 to G4-EN25
Climate strategy, Guidelines for Sustainability in Business
Operations, recording of environmental data using
accounting software.
Environmental violations and violations of human rights by
suppliers, climate change, biodiversity and loss of species diversity,
worldwide scarcity of raw materials and natural resources,
destruction of nature reserves and forests essential to life.
G4-DMA, G4-EC9, G4-HR5,
G4-HR6, G4-HR10
Supplier information questionnaire, Sustainability
Agreement, product group strategies, Guidelines for
Sustainability in Business Operations.
Environmental violations and violations of human rights in financing
projects, climate change, biodiversity and loss of species diversity,
worldwide scarcity of raw materials and natural resources,
destruction of nature reserves and forests essential to life.
G4-DMA, G4-EC2, G4-HR1,
FS 6-8, FS 10-11
Company exclusion list for anti-personnel mines, cluster
munitions and delivery systems for cluster munitions,
Kredit.net regulations, Guidelines for Sustainability in
the Lending Business.
Financial crisis, environmental violations and violations of human
rights in investment transactions, climate change, biodiversity and
loss of species diversity, worldwide scarcity of raw materials and
natural resources, destruction of nature reserves and forests
essential to life.
G4-DMA, G4-EC2, G4-HR1,
FS 7-8, FS 10-11
Compliance with the Principles for Responsible
Investment, Guidelines for Sustainability in Investment
Business, exclusion criteria for proprietary investments,
company exclusion list for anti-personnel mines, cluster
munitions and delivery systems for cluster munitions.
Disclosure of investment criteria and investment policies, worldwide
scarcity of raw materials and resources, destruction of nature
reserves and forests essential to life, biodiversity and loss of species
diversity, climate change, sustainability-related growth markets.
G4-DMA, G4-EC2, FS 6-8,
FS 10-11
Share of total volume accounted for by sustainable
investment products, signing of the European SRI
Transparency Code for the »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien«
and »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten« retail investment
funds, compliance with the Principles for Responsible
Investment and Guidelines for Sustainability in the
Investment Business.
Climate change, financing needs in innovative and promising
sectors, projects and technologies, worldwide scarcity of raw
materials and resources.
G4-DMA, G4-EN7, G4-EC2,
FS 6-8
Percentage of total project finance portfolio accounted
for by credit facilities drawn for renewable energy
projects, percentage of project financing accounted
for by credit facilities drawn by energy type, climate
strategy, Guidelines for Sustainability in the Lending
Business.
Data protection, avoidance of social exclusion.
G4-DMA, G4-PR6 to G4-PR8,
FS14
23
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
LBBW Sustainability Policy
LBBW Focus Areas
LBBW Focus Issues
Effect on Our Sustainability
Balance Sheet
Real estate
Real estate financing, financing and
consulting on building renovations to
improve energy efficiency, sustainable
construction standards for customer
projects, municipal development,
clean-ups of existing contamination
and return of sites to their natural state.
Average
Customers
Product responsibility/consumer
protection
Responsible sales practices, customerfocused advising, compliance with legal
regulations pertaining to advertising,
prevention of poverty among the elderly
and excessive debt, fraud prevention for
customers, personal finance education for
youth, dealing with customers with
payment problems.
Significant
Human resources
Personnel management, hiring and
development
Training and continuing education,
management of employees.
Average
Work-life balance
Flexible working time models, offer of
childcare options.
Average
Corporate culture
Equal opportunities and cultural diversity,
health management, fair compensation
models, occupational safety, inclusion,
co-determination by employees.
Average
Corporate citizenship
Promoting foundations, corporate
volunteering, promoting sports, social and
environmental projects, art and culture.
Minimal
Stakeholder dialog
Exchange of opinions with stakeholder
groups in society.
Significant
Social commitment and
communications
24
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Macro Sustainability Issues and Influencing Laws
GRI Indicators
Selected More Detailed, Internal LBBW Parameters,
Internal Standards and Voluntary Commitments
Signed
Worldwide scarcity of raw materials and natural resources,
climate change, energy efficiency.
G4-DMA, G4-EN27, FS8
Standards for construction of new sustainable buildings.
Loss of confidence due to the financial crisis, safeguarding customer
interests, excessive debt, needs-based advising, transparency,
protecting banking secrecy, data protection.
G4-DMA, G4-PR3, G4-PR5,
G4-PR6, G4-PR8
Voluntary commitments in advertising according to
Deutscher Werberat (German Advertising Council)
guidelines, work instruction on investor and propertyspecific advising.
Social responsibility as an employer, demographic change.
G4-LA9 to G4-LA11
Personnel development measures per employee (KPI),
employee review rate, Guidelines for Sustainability in
Human Resources Management.
Social responsibility as an employer, provisions of collective
agreements, demographic change.
No. of spots in LBBW-internal daycare facilities (KPI),
Guidelines for Sustainability in Human Resources
Management.
Social responsibility as an employer, demographic change, equal
opportunity, discrimination, co-determination rights, provisions of
collective agreements.
G4-LA1 to G4-LA16,
G4-HR3 to G4-HR6
Contribution to regional development of LBBW locations.
G4-EC1, G4-SO1
Transparency in business activities, identifying societal
expectations of LBBW.
G4-16, G4-24 to G4-27
Leadership positions (KPI), Diversity Charter, Guidelines
for Sustainability in Human Resources Management.
25
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
In order to concentrate even more closely on the key
aspects of our sustainability activities, we conducted a
materiality analysis in 2014, focusing on the question
as to which future global changes would impact LBBW
and in what way, and our stakeholders’ expectations
in this regard. We will be reconciling the results of this
materiality analysis step by step with our sustainability
policy and goals, the Guidelines for Sustainability and
the previous aspects on which we have focused, making any necessary adjustments.
Materiality Analysis 2014.
Our materiality analysis, in which 21 employees
from 16 specialized departments of LBBW participated,
evaluates the significance of twelve global changes for
society. In addition, it formulates the expectations –
from the vantage point of the participants – which the
stakeholders currently have of LBBW and weights the
business opportunities and risks on a 2024 horizon.
In this way, it seeks to provide a differentiated view
and evaluation of two levels, namely, the social and
the business relevance of global changes. The results
provide us with valuable input for the further development of our sustainability strategy and communications with our stakeholders.
26
Business relevance: Global changes with high opportunity or risk potential for LBBW’s business performance
on a 2024 horizon are primarily of relevance for the
further development of the sustainability strategy, our
sustainability policy and our range of products and
services.
Social relevance: Global changes which already have
great relevance for our stakeholders and simultaneously give rise to high expectations of LBBW should
form the main focus of our communications with our
stakeholders.
As a result of the analysis of social and business
relevance, the following aspects were identified as
being material:
– Scarcity of resources
– Pollution
– Demographic change
– Diversity and equal opportunities
– Digitization and transparency
The analysis of social relevance also considered
human rights, while the analysis of business relevance
identified climate change and health.
Global challenges which the stakeholders view as
having lesser relevance for society and LBBW’s core
business comprise biodiversity, access to water,
population growth/urbanization and poverty.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Materiality Analysis – Social Level*
10
Digitization and
transparency
9
II
Relevance for stakeholders
8
7
Health
Climate
change
Resource
scarcity
Population
growth and
urbanization
6
I
Demographic
change
Pollution
Human rights
Diversity and equal
opportunities
5
Access Poverty
to water
4
III
IV
3
Biodiversity
2
1
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Expectation of LBBW
Materiality Analysis – Business Level*
10
Digitization and
transparency
9
II
8
7
Opportunities
Resource
scarcity
Health
I
Pollution
Demographic
change
Climate
change
Access to
water
6
Diversity &
equal opportunities
5
4
Biodiversity
Population growth
and urbanization
IV
3
2
III
Poverty
Human
rights
1
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Risks
* The size of the circles indicates the degree of uncertainty concerning future developments/future underlying conditions
(large circle signifies great uncertainty).
27
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
These are the details of the aspects identified as being
material and their implications for LBBW:
Resource scarcity: Volatile commodity prices and less
reliable supplies in the wake of political crises are
heightening the relevance of resource scarcity for our
corporate customers. They therefore expect LBBW to
offer suitable hedging products. Funding programs
for renewable energies in particular help to reduce
resource consumption and simultaneously offer
promising business opportunities.
Pollution: Stakeholders have a high degree of environmental awareness. No company can afford to neglect
environmental protection today. LBBW can derive relevant business opportunities by supporting internationally leading German companies in the area of environmental technology. On the other hand, breaches of
environmental rules harbor the risk of considerable
reputational harm.
Demographic change: Our stakeholders expect
reasonable working conditions for older employees
and barrier-free access to banking services. Modern
products and services allow LBBW to address changes
in its customer base and in customer requirements but
also entail risks. The shortage of trained staff calls for
sustainable personnel management.
Diversity and equal opportunities: Diversity is growing in relevance. Today, diversity and equal opportunities form part of good corporate governance. Stakeholders have high expectations, meaning that the
reputation risks are correspondingly large. Looking
forward, the growing diversity of customers will also
be matched by even greater diversity with respect to
the Bank’s employees.
Digitization and transparency: The digital transformation and the increasingly closer interconnectedness
of companies and society are of extreme relevance for
28
our stakeholders. LBBW must establish digital distribution channels allowing it to harness new opportunities
in a highly competitive market in which non-banks are
increasingly also playing a role. The requirements of
transparent corporate culture have risen substantially
since the financial crisis.
Human rights: Observance of human rights forms the
basis for all business relations for LBBW and also with
respect to its suppliers and customers. Their relevance
for stakeholders is high and this issue attracts close
media attention.
Climate change: Statutory requirements with respect
to climate change are having massive repercussions
for the business strategies and models of our corporate
customers and their business partners. LBBW can
particularly derive opportunities from the provision of
finance for innovations and technologies in connection
with structural change in favor of a low-carbon-dioxide
economy. By the same token, the provision of finance
for technologies involving heavy emissions of carbon
dioxide is increasingly giving rise to reputational risks.
Health: Stakeholders’ health awareness is growing,
this also being due partially to the demographic
change. Requirements with respect to healthy workplaces are increasing. The growing market offers business opportunities and, hence, heightened demand for
financing solutions for investments. On the other
hand, new regulatory requirements harbor risks.
Looking forward over the next few months and years,
we will be additionally analyzing the results of the
workshops with the individual stakeholder groups in
order to optimize the activities and the evaluation of
the measures taken step by step. The focus themes
which have been identified will be increasingly integrated in stakeholder communications, such as the
LBBW Sustainability Report.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Implementation of the
Sustainability Program 2014.
■
The various departments play a significant role in the
sustainability management system. It is not until environmental and social criteria are integrated into their
business activities that sustainability can be actively
pursued and implemented.
Thus, the specific sustainability goals and measures
are identified in cooperation with the specialized divisions and their implementation planned. The sustainability program is regularly updated and presented to
the Board of Managing Directors on an annual basis.
In 2014, the Program comprised a total of 29 projects.
Of these, 27 were completed in full, while two were
not completed.
The following tables provide an overview of the
2014 Program broken down by the six sustainability
activities (see p. 22 ff.) along with each project’s
status.
Corporate Management
Measure
Organization and sponsorship of theater
activities to inform customers and
citizens of the risks of home burglaries
and cybercrime.
Responsible
Retail customers/
Private Banking
Stuttgart
Status
✔
Implementation
20 theater events entitled »Der ungebetene Gast« (The
Uninvited Guest) to inform customers – particularly senior
citizens – were organized in the course of 2014 throughout
the entire Stuttgart city area at BW-Bank branches together
with the regional council and the local police.
Business Operations
Measure
Responsible
Further reduction in average carbon
dioxide emissions of pool vehicles from
124 g/km* to less than 120 g/km*.
Group Purchasing
Introduction of corrective measures if
negative trends are observed in usage
data.
BW Immobilien
GmbH
8,300 PCs and 1,200 notebooks replaced
by more energy-efficient models.
Period: 11/2013 to 9/2014
IT
Status
Implementation
✔
Substantially more economical pool vehicles acquired,
allowing average CO2 emissions to be reduced to 107 g/km
(31 December 2014).
✔
Now that the final environmental data for 2014 is available,
it is clear that absolute consumption and performance
ratios very largely dropped over the previous year or
remained at roughly the same level.
Accordingly, no corrective measures were necessary.
✔
The PCs and notebooks were replaced by more energyefficient models, which consume only around 50 watts
instead of 70 – 100 watts. This measure was completed in
November 2014.
* According to manufacturer’s specifications; December 2012
✔ completed ✘ not completed
29
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Measure
Storage consolidation to save energy
Responsible
Status
✔
The data on local servers was consolidated on a central
storage unit.
The hard disk capacity was increased; this resulted in
energy savings of around 40 %. The technical replacement
of the data backup systems will reduce energy requirements by around 45 %.
✔
In connection with the migration from Windows Server
2003 to Windows Server 2008, further systems were
transferred to virtual systems (parallel operation of
different server systems on a single physical unit through
the use of special software and hardware technologies).
✔
The IT measures were implemented in the 1st quarter
of 2014:
Black-and-white printing is now the default mode for
multifunctional devices.
Fax log lists are only printed out when required.
IT
Server virtualization as a means of
saving energy
IT
IT measures to conserve resources:
– Color printouts are to be reduced by
around one-third.
– Fax log lists are no longer automatically
printed out
IT
Implementation
Core Business/Banking Products
Measure
Launch and marketing of an action-based
sustainable savings bond by the Retail
Customers/Private Banking Stuttgart
division.
Retail Customers/
Private Banking
Stuttgart
Establishment of a format for sustainability events in the Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart division.
Retail Customers/
Private Banking
Stuttgart
Distribution of a covered bond with
sustainable added value (ESG* covered
bond).
Capital Markets –
Customers
Green Bond Principles of the ICMA
(International Capital Market Association)
signed.
(* ESG = Environment, Social, Governance)
30
Responsible
Capital Markets –
Customers
Status
Implementation
✔
The »BW ZukunftsSparbrief« savings product for retail
customers in Stuttgart was launched at the branches as
a campaign product on 17 February 2014. The original
availability period was extended several times until the
end of the year due to the strong demand by customers
(see p. 63).
✔
The »Forum for a sustainable future« series was launched.
By the end of 2014, three top-quality speakers had been
recruited for evening presentations on sustainability-related matters. Around 300 customers attended each of the
presentations (see p. 39).
✔
In September 2014, Münchener Hypothekenbank eG issued
a sustainable mortgage-covered bond (ESG covered bond).
This is the world’s first covered bond whose cover stock
is selected on the basis of ecological, social and politicosocietal sustainability criteria. LBBW underwrote the issue
and placed it with investors (see p. 64).
The purpose of the covered bond issue is to fund loans for
cooperative housing construction in Germany. The funds
are used to acquire or build housing for less well-off social
classes and to renovate and maintain them in line with
energy-efficiency requirements.
✔
LBBW signed the Green Bond Principles on 17 September
2014. Since then it has been listed as a signatory of the
Green Bond Principles on the ICMA’s website
(www.icmagroup.org/Regulatory-Policy-and-Market-Practice/
green-bonds/green-bond-principles/).
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Measure
Responsible
Completion of annual portfolio screening
of the investments of unallocated equity
to ensure compliance with exclusion
criteria.
Market price risk
management in
the non-trading
book
Re-signing of the European SRI
Transparency Code for the
»LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« and
»LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten«
sustainable retail investment funds.
LBBW Asset
Management
Investmentgesellschaft mbH
Organizing events on the issue of
renovating existing buildings to improve
energy efficiency in cooperation with
Energieberatungszentrum (Energy
Consulting Center) Stuttgart.
Retail Customers/
Private Banking
Stuttgart
Redesign of, updating of the content
and further clarification of the defense
industry review process in lending
business.
Credit Policy and
Guidelines and
Credit Risk
Strategy
Status
Implementation
✔
In 2011, sustainability criteria were defined for the
investment of LBBW’s free, unallocated equity. The
exclusion criteria include child labor as well as violations
of labor laws and human rights violations. The review is
conducted by the sustainability rating agency oekom
research AG and covers all interest-bearing securities and
borrower’s note loans placed directly on the capital market.
As at 31 December 2014, these were valued at EUR 2.95
billion (19 % of the total portfolio).
✔
The European Transparency Code was re-signed for both
funds in May 2014. As a result, they both bear the European
transparency logo for sustainable retail funds for the
period from 1 June 2014 until 31 May 2015.
The relevant declarations can be found on the website of
LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH
(www.LBBW-AM.de).
✔
Between May and July 2014 a total of four customer events
were held on the topic of renovating existing buildings to
improve energy efficiency. In addition, BW-Bank held the
2nd Stuttgart Forum for Communities of Residential
Owners in October 2014 in conjunction with EBZ.
✔
The revised internal rules on reputation and sustainability
risks in lending business also included further details in
connection with the restrictive approach for finance for
exports of arms of war.
Customers
Measure
Expansion of the BW-Bank’s foundation
portal to improve fund-raising opportunities for non-profit foundations.
Responsible
Status
Wealth Management
✔
Implementation
The networking and fund-raising possibilities offered
by the foundation portal were improved. The summary
presentations of the foundations were revised and
simplified in January 2014. More space was provided for
information on upcoming events. User convenience was
optimized.
✔ completed ✘ not completed
31
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Human Resources
Measure
32
Responsible
Introduction of a mentoring program for
women (continued from the previous
year).
Human Resources
Continuation of the »Strengthening
Mental Health« initiative.
Human Resources
As part of company health management
(CHM), a »Compact CHM Cycle« was
developed for all business units based on
the PDCA (plan, do, check, act) process.
Human Resources
Introduction of new health offerings for
employees.
Human Resources
Systematic discussion of achieving the
right work-life balance in a dialog
between employees and managers.
Human Resources
At least four sessions on caring for family
members offered.
Human Resources
Additions to child care options.
Human Resources
Status
Implementation
✔
An information meeting was held on 29 January 2014
for all employees interested in the mentoring program.
22 mentees were selected on the basis of the criteria for
inclusion in the program.
✔
The internal education program was expanded with
seminars and offerings on strengthening mental health,
stress management and active relaxation.
In addition, all employees are able to participate in the
»Stress? Regaining the right work-life balance« seminar,
full-day resilience training and individual advice on how
to avoid stress.
Since the beginning of the year, mental health has formed
an integral part of basic leadership training (healthy
management).
✘
The Compact CHM cycle was developed and launched but
did not meet with any interest in the specialized divisions.
Accordingly, adjustments are necessary and are being
planned.
✔
– Employees who must travel more than 30 kilometers
from their homes to one of the head offices receive a
grant towards health promotion measures (e. g. on being
smoke-free and on nutrition).
– A nutrition expert is available at the Stuttgart office once
a month to provide one-to-one advice. A nutrition expert
is also regularly available at the offices in Karlsruhe,
Leipzig and Mannheim.
– The company health service offered metabolism screening
over a period of eight weeks in 2014.
– The first regional health conference was held at the
Heilbronn branch on 5 July 2014.
✔
The employee talk was adjusted with the addition of the
»free talk« elements for discussing work-life balance
matters and ideas in respect of working conditions.
The new system was launched in May 2014.
✔
Four workshops dealing with care for family members were
offered in 2014 and information and advice provided to
employees across the entire Group (see p. 77, 95 ff.).
✔
– Elimination of the three-week period in the summer when
the »Frechdax« daycare center at the Stuttgart office was
closed in 2014. At least five drop-in spots will be available
in the summer.
– Daycare is regularly provided for primary-school children
at the Stuttgart and Mannheim offices during summer
vacations. No other offices reported any requirements.
– The daycare center at Sparkassenakademie 14 in Stuttgart
provided additional regular daycare spots for the children
of employees.
– An additional two spots were offered in Karlsruhe for a
period of three years.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Measure
Responsible
Study on a better work-life balance and
on systematically leveraging the potential
of women.
Human Resources
Annual reporting to maintain the
»berufundfamilie« audit (Work and Family
Audit) certificate from the Hertie
Foundation.
Human Resources
An event centered on sustainability
through the »Extras Erleben« (Experience
extras) employee program was organized
and offered.
Human Resources
Pilot seminar on sustainability aimed at
apprentices of all ages in all specializations in cooperation with the Academy
for Nature Preservation and Environmental Protection in Baden-Württemberg.
Human Resources
Organization of a special event day
as part of the »NACHgefragt« internal
communication series: Tangible
sustainability in an expedition vehicle
with exhibits and multimedia terminals
exploring the issues of energy production, storage, distribution and consumption.
Human Resources
Status
✘
✔
Implementation
The study was not carried out in 2014 due to insufficient
capacity. However, the matter will continue to be pursued
via the »Career and family audit«.
The annual report on the progress made in implementing
measures was reviewed and rated favorably by the Hertie
Foundation (see p. 95 ff.).
✔
An event entitled »Per ,Du‘ mit der Natur – Ein Besuch im
,Haus der Natur Obere Donau‘« (Up close with nature –
a visit to the Upper Danube House of Nature) was held on
19 July 2014.
The 40 participants visited the natural reserve of the Upper
Danube Nature Park and the wildlife garden. This was
followed by a guided tour and a visit to a farm managed in
an ecologically innovative way.
✔
24 apprentices attended the sustainability seminar for
young banking employees at LBBW held in conjunction with
the Academy for Nature Preservation and Environmental
Protection in Baden-Württemberg on 14 April 2014. This
seminar covered the following topics:
– Developing empathy with nature and the environment
– Understanding ecological matters in a global context and
the consequences of your own actions
– The role played by banks in sustainable development
– Sharing and discussing experience
✔
The expedition vehicle visited the LBBW Stuttgart office on
24 and 25 June 2014. The »Nachhaltigkeit zum Anfassen«
(Tangible Sustainability) exhibition used over 20 interactive
exhibits and multimedia terminals to explain the basis of
energy production, storage, distribution and consumption.
It was accompanied by a film evening at which »Energie 2.0
– Energie intelligent nutzen« (Energy 2.0 – Using Energy
Intelligently) was shown.
Social Commitment and Communications
Measure
Launch of a crowdfunding platform
for Baden-Württemberg to support
fundraising for small-scale charitable
and social projects via the Internet.
Responsible
Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart
Region
Status
✔
Implementation
The »bw crowd« crowdfunding platform (www.bw-crowd.de)
was launched at the beginning of 2014. Associations,
municipalities, organizations and private individual can
submit and advertise their projects on this platform to
obtain small financial contributions from a large number of
people. BW-Bank supports the projects on bw crowd with
an additional EUR 1,000 each month (see p. 100).
✔ completed ✘ not completed
33
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Sustainability Program 2015 and Onward.
The specialized divisions of LBBW and its subsidiaries
have included the following projects in the sustainability program 2015 and onward.
In the case of »ongoing« measures a further activity is
necessary as they have not yet been transferred to a
process defined in LBBW’s standard rules.
Business Operations
Measure
By
Responsible specialized
division(s)
Server virtualization (simultaneous parallel operation of
various server systems on a physical unit through the use of
special software and hardware technology) to reduce energy
requirements. Currently 2/3 physical servers, 1/3 virtual
servers (September 2014).
Goal 6 LBBW’s
consumption of
resources
ongoing
IT
Introduction of the »electronic file« and electronic correspondence in promotional lending business for paperless communications between LBBW, the savings banks and the development
banks (see p. 122).
Goal 6 LBBW’s
consumption of
resources
12/2015
Savings Banks and Bank
Operations
Purchase of 100 % green electricity for LBBW, BW-Bank, LBBW
Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank buildings for 2015
and 2016.
(Requirement: 100 % electricity from renewable sources with
EECS proof of origin in accordance with Directive 2009/28/EC)
Goal 6 LBBW’s
consumption of
resources
12/2015
Organization and
Processes
Introduction of corrective measures if negative trends are
observed in usage data.
Goal 6 LBBW’s
consumption of
resources
ongoing
BW Immobilien GmbH
Introduction of a carbon dioxide guidance for company cars* of
between 130 g/km and 150 g/km (depending on management
level) with bonus/penalty system.
Goal 6 LBBW’s
consumption of
resources
12/2015
Organization and
Processes
Co-development of the Stuttgart PolygoCard (mobility and
services) for use as a public transport ticket, key for car-sharing
services, loading card for e-charging terminals and contactless
payment card. One particular focus is on promoting electromobility services.
Goal 4 Reduction of CO2
emissions generated by
projects, products and
customers
12/2015
Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart Region
Provisions of »TwoGo by SAP« carpooling platform for all
employees of the LBBW Group through the acquisition of
appropriate licenses (initially one-year pilot project).
Goal 6 LBBW’s
consumption of
resources
12/2015
Organization and
Processes
Certification in accordance with the DGE Quality Standard for
in-company catering, greater focus on organic, regional and
seasonal foods.
Goal 7 Procurement
and services
12/2015
Bank Services
* Company car = a vehicle which an LBBW employee is permitted to use
34
Sustainability Goal
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Core Business/Banking Products
Measure
Sustainability Goal
By
Responsible specialized
division(s)
Performance of annual portfolio screening of the investments
of unallocated equity to ensure compliance with exclusion
criteria.
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
ongoing
Asset/Liability
Management and Own
Investments
Re-signing of the European SRI Transparency Code for the
»LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« and »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit
Renten« sustainable retail investment funds.
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
ongoing
LBBW Asset Management
Investmentgesellschaft
mbH
Distribution of a further covered bond with sustainable added
value (»green covered bond«). The proceeds are used to fund
existing commercial green buildings and for future finance for
new green buildings (see p. 64).
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
12/2015
Capital Markets – Clients
Bank-wide launch of the »BW ZukunftsSparbrief« savings
product for distribution by BW-Bank.
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
12/2015
Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart Region
Further execution of customer events in the »Forum für eine
nachhaltige Zukunft« (Forum for a sustainable future) series.
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
ongoing
Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart Region
Customers
Measure
Development and publication of guidelines for advising retail
customers at BW-Bank (see p. 60).
Sustainability Goal
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
By
12/2015
Responsible specialized
division(s)
Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart Region
Human Resources
Measure
Sustainability Goal
By
Responsible specialized
division(s)
Annual reporting to maintain the »berufundfamilie« audit
(Work and Family Audit) certificate from the Hertie Foundation.
Goal 5 Work
organization and
working conditions
ongoing
Human Resources
Offer of an event centered on sustainability through the
»Extras Erleben« (Experience extras) employee program.
Goal 5 Work
organization and
working conditions
12/2015
Group Communications,
Marketing and Staff Unit
of the Board of Managing
Directors
Stop smoking seminar for all LBBW employees.
Goal 5 Work
organization and
working conditions
12/2015
Human Resources
Further additions to child care facilities:
4 spots in a private child care facility in Leipzig.
Goal 5 Work
organization and
working conditions
12/2015
Human Resources
35
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Social Commitment and Communication
Measure
Sustainability Goal
Responsible specialized
division(s)
Organization of a »Science Slam« on sustainability for young
customers.
Goal 1 + 2 Cash and
other investments
12/2015
Retail Customers/Private
Banking Stuttgart Region
Development of a possibility for all active employees of LBBW,
BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank to
contribute the amounts behind the decimal point of their
monthly salaries for social projects.
Target 5
12/2015
Group Communications,
Marketing and Staff Unit
of the Board of Managing
Directors
As a rule, environmental projects carried out in the
past and now running permanently are no longer
included in the current Sustainability Program.
■
■
■
They include the following:
■ waste plan with color-coded routing system
(including the collection of organic waste),
(see p. 125 ff.)
■ switching off lights automatically at the main offices
■ utilization of waste heat from the data center
(see p. 116)
■ video conference rooms in the main offices to
reduce business travel (see p. 123)
36
By
■
■
bicycle parking, showers and lockers at the main
offices
extensive green roofing
recycled paper as the standard copy paper
(see p. 121)
automatic shut-down of workstation terminals and
laptops at night (Wake On LAN)
sustainability projects in the company cafeterias
(e. g. serving fair-trade, organic coffee in the main
offices, organic certification in two canteens),
(see p. 88 f.)
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Stakeholder
Communication.
The diversity of LBBW’s various stakeholder groups is matched by
the variability of their interests and demands on us. We endeavor
to systematically record and evaluate the expectations of what
we consider to be our most important stakeholders (customers,
employees, owners and social groups). We believe that they can give
us valuable suggestions for improving our sustainability management, leveraging business opportunities and avoiding risks.
We inform our stakeholders regularly about our commitment
to sustainability and exchange information with them at various
events.
Sustainability Reporting.
We provide information about our sustainability
activities on our sustainability website and in our
comprehensive Sustainability Report. We publish the
Report online and supplement it with current news at
the LBBW sustainability site. The LBBW Sustainability
Report is based on the established reporting standards of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI, see
www.globalreporting.org). It was prepared on the
basis of the GRI G4 standard for the first time in 2015.
In addition to the full Report, our sustainability site
(www.LBBW.de/nachhaltigkeit) also provides a condensed publication entitled »At a Glance: Sustainability
at LBBW«. This document presents a compact overview
of LBBW’s sustainability commitment.
37
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Internal Communication.
The Blue.net Intranet is the central internal communications tool at LBBW. With around 170,000 page views
per day, it is a comprehensive and actively used information platform. It also contains numerous news
items, market reports and links related to sustainability and LBBW’s activities. Thus, for example, we
informed our employees of the market performance
of sustainable financial investments and LBBW’s offerings, the service card for e-mobility co-developed
by BW-Bank (see p. 107) as well as crowd funding, a
matter which is currently attracting considerable interest, and BW-Bank’s new bw crowd online platform (see
p. 100). As well as this, employees received via the Intranet an invitation to participate in the 1st Stuttgart
Sustainability Slam (see p. 59) and the »Rest Cent«
donation initiative (see p. 103 ff.).
Sustainability issues have also found a permanent
home in the quarterly employee publication »inside«.
We use both media to inform employees about our
sustainability activities in order to enhance acceptance
of the issue and gain like-minded partners.
38
Communication with
Customers and Investors.
We regularly exchange information with our retail and
corporate customers as well as our institutional investors at trade fairs and conferences and an entire series
of events we organize:
■ PRI meetings: LBBW regularly participates in the
PRI meetings of domestic asset owners to discuss
current issues relating to the voluntary commitment
to the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI).
■ 4th LBBW Capital Market Forum in Vienna on
25 March 2015: LBBW Asset Management held a
presentation entitled »Sustainable investment –
greater stability in a low interest-rate setting«. The
forum was attended by more than 80 institutional
customers representing insurance companies and
pension funds as well as asset managers.
■ ConSozial on 5/6 November 2014: A management
symposium for top-level management of social institutions was held at the leading congress/exhibition
for the social welfare market for the first time. LBBW
Asset Management supported the symposium, had
a stand there and held a presentation on sustainable
investments on the fair stage. More than 5,000
experts from charities, foundations, associations
and public-sector welfare funds attended the fair,
which is held annually in Nuremberg.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
■
■
■
oekom research’s »Doppelte Dividende 2014« (Twice
the return 2014): LBBW Asset Management was an
exhibitor at the conference organized by rating
agency oekom research, at which suppliers, investors
and finance experts exchanged information about
the latest developments in the sustainable investment
market, and participated in a panel discussion on
strategies for sustainable investment.
»Finanzforum« organized by »Stuttgarter Zeitung«
and »Stuttgarter Nachrichten«: BW-Bank held a
presentation entitled »Sustainable investments –
searching for sense and return« at the premiere of
this conference. It attracted around 450 participants
interested in finding out more about the capital
markets and investments.
LBBW »Forum for a sustainable future« series of
lectures: At the end of 2013, the Stuttgart front
office launched a new series of lectures aimed at
generating impetus for sustainable approaches and
initiatives. At the third forum held on 6 October
2014, Prof. Gunter Pauli, co-founder of the »Blue
Economy« initiative, met with an enthusiastic
response on the part of an audience of almost 400
with his ideas on the recycling economy. The fourth
forum on 13 July 2015 focused on social aspects
of sustainability. Prof. Götz W. Werner gave a presentation entitled »Creating meaning, appreciation,
confidence: What kind of society do we want to live
in?«. With over 400 participants, this forum was also
fully booked.
■
Events with the Stuttgart Energy Consulting Center
(EBZ): 2014 saw the continuation of the successful
collaboration with EBZ. In four joint evening events
with Baden-Württemberg’s Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection and the Energy Sector,
the owners of older properties and other interested
parties were informed in various presentations and
an exhibition about options for renovating singlefamily homes and duplexes to improve energy
efficiency as well as the opportunities for public
subsidies for these projects. In addition, BW-Bank
joined forces with EBZ to organize the »2nd Stuttgart Forum for Communities of Residential Owners«
on 28 October 2014. Roughly 300 residential community managers were able to find out more about
energy efficiency, renovation planning, development
programs, insurance matters and practical technological solutions.
39
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Sustainability Ratings,
Awards and
Memberships.
Increasingly, customers today want to know more about their bank’s
sense of responsibility is and how sustainable its products are. Sustainability ratings by independent agencies reflect how well institutions perform against the competition. As an active member of various sustainability initiatives, we aim to raise awareness of
sustainable business policies and practices.
Sustainability Ratings.
Just as we evaluate the sustainability performance
of companies, partners and suppliers, so too is our
commitment to sustainability reviewed by neutral
rating agencies. Sustainability ratings, unlike ratings
measuring financial strength, are not commissioned
by the companies being rated, but instead by investors. They are an important basis for decisionmaking
for the constantly growing number of sustainabilityoriented investors, who have long included conventional institutional investors, not just charitable organizations.
40
Both the number of sustainability ratings and depth
of their analyses have grown: Today, agencies evaluate
more than 100 individual criteria.
The most recent results that LBBW has achieved in
the various ratings and that were known to us by
the editorial deadline for the Sustainability Report
(31 August 2015) are described below. If we know our
ranking, this is listed as well.
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Rankings.
■
■
■
Munich-based oekom research AG has awarded
LBBW an overall rating of C+ on a scale of A+ to D–.
This result put LBBW in the top five out of 84 banks
analyzed internationally in the »Financials/Public &
Regional Banks« segment as of June 2015. LBBW
meets the minimum standards for sustainability
management defined by oekom research and is
ranked »Prime«. This means that the LBBW's markettraded securities qualify for investment from
an ecological and social viewpoint.
In the Sustainalytics Sustainability Rating, LBBW
received 77 of 100 possible points and therefore
ranks 18th out of 410 banks in the international
banks category. This is the second best ranking
achieved by a German financial institution (July 2015).
LBBW was rated »positive« in the imug Sustainability
Rating for 2014 as an issuer of public-sector covered
bonds (BBB) and mortgage-backed bonds (B). As an
issuer of unsecured bonds (CC), it received a neutral
overall rating. The term »unsecured bonds« describes
all types of unsecured fixed-income securities as
well as time and savings deposits. This places
LBBW in the upper quarter of the 113 rated German
and international issuers of bank bonds (as of
March 2015).
BW-Bank’s asset management team once again took
top honors in firstfive’s ranking in 2015. firstfive AG
provides asset management services and prepares
extensive performance comparisons based on a database of more than 300 real, professionally managed
portfolios. We were in the top five in the »Dynamic«
risk class in the monthly ranking in 2015 in an analysis
of performance over a five-year period (30 June 2015).
Our expertise in foundation management was recognized once again. As in the previous three years,
BW-Bank achieved a top ranking in the prestigious
FUCHSBRIEFE Report 2015. In its announcement of
the award, the jury praised the outstanding quality of
the investment of foundation assets in the investment
proposal, portfolio quality, transparency and service
categories as well as the convincing presentation of
the solution to the jury and the members of the foundation boards in Munich.
41
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Awards.
»LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« and
»LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten« (see p. 62 f.)
Advice (see p. 60)
Human resources policy (see p. 76 ff.)
Foundation management (see p. 66 f.)
Environment (see p. 46 f., p. 106 ff.)
42
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Ratings (see p. 41)
Idea management (see p. 95)
RANKING
TOTAL SCORE
18 out of 410
77
43
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Memberships and Initiatives.
UNEP Finance Initiative
LBBW is an active member of the United Nations
Environment Program Finance Initiative (UNEP FI), a
partnership between the UN’s Environment Program
and over 200 companies worldwide. The goal of this
partnership is to support financial institutions in integrating sustainability issues in their companies at all
levels. In addition to its global activities, UNEP FI has
initiated an annual round table in conjunction with
Verein für Umweltmanagement und Nachhaltigkeit in
Finanzinstituten e. V. (VfU – Association for Environmental Management and Sustainability in Financial
Institutions) as a forum for financial service providers
in German-speaking countries. The round table held
in November 2014 was entitled »License to Operate –
Sustainability in the Financial Sector: Between Opportunity and Obligation« (further information available
at www.vfu.de).
44
Verein für Umweltmanagement und Nachhaltigkeit
in Finanzinstituten e. V. (VfU)
As a member of the VfU, we play an active role in the
workshops and forums. We attended the following
events in 2014:
■ VfU rating dialog: sharing information with rating
agencies
■ VfU Finanzforum Klimawandel (financial forum on
climate change): sharing information and defining
measures which financial service providers can take
to counter global warming
■ VfU Forum Kreditgeschäft (forum on lending
business): sharing of information on the credit
review process (criteria, organizational structure,
process description)
■ VfU Forum Nachhaltige Kapitalanlage und Impact
Investing (forum on sustainable investments and
impact investing): sharing of information on
»effect-oriented investing«
■ VfU Programmrat (program council): proposals
for strategy development
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
German Sustainable Investment Forum
LBBW Asset Management is also a member of the
»Forum Nachhaltige Geldanlagen« (German Sustainable
Investment Forum), an association bringing together
over 160 companies and 30 individual members
promoting sustainable investments.
Principles for Responsible Investment (see p. 54 f.)
LBBW is a signatory of the United Nations’ »Principles
for Responsible Investment« (UN PRI). Under these
principles, we voluntarily undertake to observe environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG)
issues in our investment activities.
CDP
In 2015, LBBW again participated in the CDP (formerly:
Carbon Disclosure Project) as a »Signatory Investor«.
Founded in 2002, the CDP is an independent, non-profit
organization that queries thousands of the largest
stock exchange-listed companies and organizations
on all continents each year on behalf of its members.
Since 2012, it no longer just collects data on emissions
and climate strategies from companies, suppliers and
cities, but instead requests information on the responsible stewardship of water, protection for old-growth
forests and the management of environmental risks
along the supply chain. LBBW supports this initiative
and is one of the signatories to a letter that calls on
companies worldwide to disclose their emissions data
and climate strategies, and raises awareness about
responsible stewardship of resources.
German Sustainable Building Council (DGNB)
(see p. 128 f.)
LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH is a member
of Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltiges Bauen e. V.
(German Sustainable Building Council). LBBW Immobilien
Management GmbH’s development company specializes
in designing and building sustainable residential complexes and commercial space. As a service provider,
the company provides its expertise in areas such as
sustainability, revitalization project management and
efficiency improvements.
45
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Binding Standards.
As part of our sustainability management activities, we have
specified binding standards for many of the Bank’s units and
activities.
German Sustainability Code.
On 20 March 2013, Landesbank Baden-Württemberg
signed the German Sustainability Code. The Code defines the criteria that constitute the essential elements
of corporate sustainability. The performance indicators
used are the standards of the Global Reporting Initiative
(GPI) and the European Federation of Financial Analysts
Societies (EFFAS). LBBW reports regularly in what is
known as a »declaration of conformity« about its compliance with the criteria and provides justification for
diverging from these. LBBW updated its declaration
of conformity in 2015. The Sustainability Code was
initiated by the German Council for Sustainable Development. It offers stakeholders, particularly financial
analysts, comparable data for evaluating the sustainability performance of companies.
Scope of Applicability and EMAS
Certification.
Our sustainability management system is applicable
to LBBW (Bank) (i. e. including BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank) and the wholly
owned subsidiaries LBBW GastroEvent GmbH, LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH (including the integrated
company BW Immobilien GmbH) and LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
Environmental Performance Statement
The Environmental Performance Statement and the
environmental indicators and time series cover all of
the buildings extensively used by LBBW in Germany,
including leased buildings. Leased buildings and
LBBW’s offices abroad whose data is not collected are
not included. As at 31 December 2014, a total of 318
individuals were employed by the LBBW Group abroad.
Whereas data on purchasing, business trips and waste
quantities is collected and managed centrally, we compile data on electricity, heating energy and water consumption for each site individually. The usage data
for individual subsidiaries, such as LBBW GastroEvent
GmbH, which operate in LBBW buildings, is therefore
included in our Environmental Performance Statement.
In certain cases, this also applies to tenants who use
46
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
parts of our buildings and whose consumption data
cannot be determined separately.
EMAS Certification
We have committed to complying with the standards
of the Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) and
ISO 14001, and have maintained a certified environmental management system since 1998. The implementation of the Scheme and ISO standard is verified once
a year by means of an internal and external audit.
The following are validated according to EMAS and
certified according to ISO 14001:
■ four Am Hauptbahnhof buildings and two buildings
located at Pariser Platz in Stuttgart with approximately 4,797 full-time equivalents (FTE, i. e. the
number of full-time employees and part-time employees expressed as full-time employees)
■ the Fritz-Elsas-Strasse 31 building (known as
the »Bollwerk« building) in Stuttgart with around
561 FTEs
■ the Königstrasse 3 building in Stuttgart with
approximately 151 FTEs
■ the Kleiner Schlossplatz 11 building in Stuttgart
with around 296 FTEs
■ the Augustaanlage 33 building in Mannheim
with around 281 FTEs
Supplier Management.
As a major corporation, we maintain business relationships with more than 600 suppliers and service providers. The volume of products externally sourced
by Group Purchasing such as hardware and software
(62 %), advisory services (18 %), other services (8 %),
marketing, office supplies, fleet, travel, logistics and
building/technology had a total value of around
EUR 523 million in 2014.
Supplier Assessment
Activities with our suppliers are based on supplier registration. Suppliers are only accepted by LBBW if they
answer questions concerning sustainability matters on
the LBBW Supplier Portal (LBBW.de → About Us →
Procurement), among other things. The sustainability
questions relate to issues such as environmental and
social management systems, the training of employees
on environmental issues, waste disposal plans and the
publication of environmental or sustainability reports
by suppliers.
Every supplier registering with LBBW is additionally
required to acknowledge and sign the Sustainability
Agreement for LBBW Suppliers. This agreement imposes
on our suppliers the duty to comply with what we consider to be essential environmental and social criteria.
Any supplier violating the social standards contained
in the Sustainability Agreement (e. g. prohibition of
human rights abuses, such as child labor) must accept
this violation as grounds for immediate termination of
the agreement without notice.
Our »Allgemeinen Einkaufsbedingungen« (General
Terms and Conditions of Purchasing) (in German only)
also expressly govern sustainability matters:
»The Supplier shall observe the Customer’s instructions with respect to economic, environmental,
social and ethical sustainability. The Supplier shall
ensure that in the delivery of the agreed goods and
services its company, its suppliers and subcontractors observe human rights and perform the necessary training, observe the ban on child and forced
labor and avoid inhumane working conditions by
ensuring reasonable working hours, minimum
wages and health protection.«
47
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Purchasing Standards
The centrally organized purchasing operations and the
binding Bank-wide standards enable us to ensure that
sustainability issues are factored into investment decisions and, in cases where several comparable product
alternatives are available, the best product in terms of
sustainability is chosen. On the one hand, this enables
us to guarantee that the manufacture and use of products at LBBW meet the highest sustainability standards
possible. On the other hand, it allows us to promote
environmentally and socially aware policies and business practices by our business partners.
The criteria specified in the »Sustainable Procurement
and Award of Work« Work Instruction is applicable to
purchases of non-IT products. We therefore do not
purchase products made of tropical wood, produced
using child labor or manufactured under inhumane
or inequitable working conditions. In addition to these
exclusion criteria, there are also specific exclusion
criteria that apply to individual product groups such
as maximum emission levels for the volatile organic
compounds used in office furniture.
In order to support our regional economy and minimize
the transport distances, we prefer to use suppliers from
Baden-Württemberg and our other core business territories. More than 94 % of the goods and services which
we require are sourced from German suppliers.
IT Outsourcing
Effective 1 September 2013, LBBW outsourced most
of its IT activities to Finanz Informatik, the IT service
provider to the Savings Banks Finance Group (Sparkassen-Finanzgruppe) and one of the largest European
providers of IT services to banks. A large number of
LBBW employees transferred to two Finanz Informatik
subsidiaries with a contractual guarantee that they can
remain at their location. Their vested rights to existing
social security benefits were also preserved. The sub-
48
sidiaries are FI Technologie Service (FI-TS), which is
responsible for the data center, and FI Solutions Plus
(FI-SP), which specializes in customized development of
application systems and software engineering consulting. The Provider Management department is responsible for coordinating the services of FI and its subsidiaries FI-TS and FI-SP. This department represents
LBBW’s interests vis-à-vis its strategic IT partners. It
also functions as an advocate for FI within the Bank,
which is a key condition for a collaboration in partnership between the two companies.
Since the outsourcing of our IT activities, new hardware and technical software (databases, operating systems, etc.) has been purchased by FI-TS. In the course
of negotiations with FI, key sustainability guidelines
applicable at LBBW to date were incorporated into
the contract. For instance, a sustainability clause for
suppliers was agreed. Banking-specific software and
off-the-shelf software (e. g. office products) continue
to be procured by Group Purchasing at LBBW. Software
ergonomics are still reviewed by LBBW before an application is approved for use.
Service Provider and Supplier Selection at LBBW
Subsidiaries
We have developed a special sustainability clause for
BW Immobilien GmbH service contracts that requires,
among other things, that service providers comply
with all applicable environmentally relevant regulations and ensure that their employees receive sufficient training in sustainability issues. Cleaning companies are supplied with a list of substances which may
not be included in any cleaning supplies used in our
offices. The companies are required to submit the
safety specifications of the cleaning supplies which
they use and are subject to auditing by the customer.
In selecting suppliers, our subsidiary LBBW GastroEvent
GmbH, which operates our six company cafeterias,
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
gives preferred status to smaller, regional suppliers.
The majority of the fresh produce is procured from
local suppliers. We also plan our menus to incorporate
seasonal fruit and vegetables. This supports the local
farming industry and also eases the strain on the
environment due to shorter transportation routes. The
meat served is bought from selected butcher shops in
the local area with which we maintain personal relationships. When purchasing fish, we take care to support
sustainable fisheries and request certificates of origin
for all deliveries. The cafeterias in the Am Hauptbahnhof and Am Pariser Platz buildings in Stuttgart (each
serving approximately 2,400 meals per day) have been
organically certified in accordance with the EU regulation on organic food production since 2008. Seventy
percent of guests therefore have access to certified
organic meals.
The cafeterias in Stuttgart have been certified since
2015 in accordance with the DGE standard, which
attaches greater importance to organic, regional and
seasonal foods.
All LBBW GastroEvent establishments, cafeterias and
kitchenettes in the headquarters buildings have been
serving fair trade and organically grown coffee exclusively since 2009.
Sustainable Construction Materials
LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH has been a
member of Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nachhaltiges
Bauen e. V. (DNGB – German Sustainable Building
Council) since February 2011. It prioritizes the building
and certifying of sustainable office, administrative and
residential buildings primarily in accordance with the
DGNB standards. In cases where DGNB certification is
not explicitly planned, the internal «LBBW Immobilien
Development GmbH Standard for New Construction of
Sustainable Office and Administrative Buildings« and
«LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH Standard for
New Construction of Sustainable Office, Administrative
and Residential Buildings« are applicable. These internal standards are aligned with selected DGNB criteria
and, for example, ensure the use of wood from sustainable forestry and healthy indoor climates in residential buildings. Sustainability issues are also taken
into account in tenders and the awarding of contracts.
Tenders issued by BW Immobilien GmbH for real estate
used by the Bank contain an additional extensive list
of guidelines pertaining to construction materials and
ensure that they are safe from both a health and environmental perspective.
Compliance.
Responsibly doing business rests on compliance with
external and internal rules and laws. In financial institutions, effective compliance management primarily
prevents criminal acts such as money laundering,
terrorism financing, fraud, corruption and insider
trading, as well as ensuring data protection and
monitoring of financial sanctions.
The Compliance division takes a proactive approach,
providing advice on matters relating to capital market
and real estate compliance, money-laundering and
fraud prevention (other punishable acts) as well as
financial sanctions and embargoes. The decentralized
compliance structure includes compliance officers who
are responsible for compliance at the branches and
subsidiaries, as well as LBBW compliance coordinators
who serve as a link between the specialized divisions
and the central Compliance division. The aforementioned coordinators provide a point of contact for
employees in the operating units and in the branches
for all compliance-relevant issues.
The Outsourcing Evidence Center is responsible for
planned outsourcing activities. It informs the special-
49
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
ized divisions and departments in good time of any
internal rules and requirements and supports the
execution of these activities.
All employees at LBBW receive regular training on compliance-related matters. Self-teaching tools on money
laundering, fraud prevention and sustainability within
the LBBW Group must be utilized by all employees.
Code of Conduct
Sustainable business success is based on trust. In the
long term, LBBW will only be competitive if it meets its
responsibility to customers, shareholders, competitors,
business associates, the supervisory authorities and,
not least, to its own employees. For this reason,
unconditional compliance with all statutory provisions
and internal rules as well as the integrity of each individual employee constitute the foundations of sustainable corporate governance. For this purpose, a Code
of Conduct (LBBW.de → About us) has been adopted
as an overarching guideline. This Code applies to
LBBW and its subsidiaries. The aim of the Code is to
create a reliable, normative frame of reference or
guidance for responsible action of each individual
that satisfies the legal requirements and is in line with
ethical and societal standards.
Capital Market Compliance
The Capital Market Compliance department is responsible for ensuring observance of statutory rules
applicable to securities trading and related regulatory
requirements. To this end, it issues internal guidelines
and work instructions which the Bank and its employees must follow.
The annual risk analysis covers all specialized divisions
which provide securities and ancillary services. Observance of external and internal standards is monitored
regularly. In addition to centralized reviews of documents, processes and directives, monitoring is also
50
conducted on site, for instance at the branches,
private banking centers and central units. Last year,
on-site interviews at the branches were expanded with
the addition of further compliance-related issues. If any
shortcomings are found, the Compliance division works
with the relevant specialized divisions to remedy them.
One of the duties of Capital Market Compliance is to
prevent insider trading. In addition, it closely monitors
observance of the rules for employee trading and handling of insider information. The supervision of securities transactions has been enhanced with the implementation of a new IT system for capital market
compliance.
Money Laundering Prevention
In their function as financial intermediaries, banks are
particularly exposed to the risk of money laundering.
Accordingly, the LBBW Group has developed appropriate
Group-wide business and customer-related security
systems and controls for preventing money laundering
and terrorism financing. These include, for example,
rules on relations with politically exposed persons, the
process for accepting applications from new customers,
the updating of customer data and the integration of
the money laundering officer in the new-products
process.
Fraud and Corruption Prevention
At LBBW, the purpose of fraud prevention is to avert
punishable actions liable to expose the assets of LBBW
or its customers to the risk of loss or resulting in harm
to the LBBW Group’s reputation. It analyzes risks,
tracks leading indicators and implements transaction
and customer-related security systems and controls.
These activities are coordinated by a central unit.
The Fraud and Corruption Prevention Guidelines
(Betrugs- und Korruptionspräventionsrichtlinien) constitute LBBW Bank’s and Group’s rules and regulations
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
for combating criminal activity. This document outlines major preventive measures and general organizational requirements (e. g. options for reporting
suspicious activity). These standards are implemented
in the guidelines for giving and receiving incentives
(gifts, invitations, events), for example. Irregularities
and suspicious activity can also be reported anonymously via an external ombudsman. This option is
implemented and communicated across the Group
at all branches and in all subsidiaries.
Measures and organizational requirements for the
Bank and the Group are defined in the internal guidelines. For instance, all cross-border payments and the
entire LBBW customer list are automatically compared
every day against German and international sanction
and embargo lists. The same is true of internal company
exclusion lists for cluster munitions and anti-personnel
landmines. The processes and IT-based verification
procedures required to do so are already firmly established in-house.
In an annual threat analysis, all possible internal and
external risks with regard to fraud and other punishable acts faced by the Bank and the Group are identified and evaluated, and suitable preventive measures
developed on this basis.
A country and product matrix on the LBBW Intranet
contains all of the relevant internal standards for
cross-border business (e. g. concerning financial sanctions, embargoes, critical industry-country combinations due to sustainability and reputation risks, country strategies) in order to harmonize the verification
process and render it more efficient.
A joint project by the city of Stuttgart and BW-Bank
raises awareness, especially among our older customers, of data protection, theft and Internet fraud. A play
called »The Uninvited Guest«, which was performed
22 times at various Stuttgart branches of BW-Bank in
2014, illustrates how burglars and data thieves operate
and how people can best protect themselves. A brochure illustrating the issues covered is available at all
branches.
Further information on compliance can be found on
p. 30 ff. of the 2014 LBBW Annual Report.
In 2014, no corruption proceedings were conducted
against LBBW or the subsidiaries integrated into the
sustainability management process. No fines were
levied (with the exception of fines for traffic offenses
involving vehicles registered in the Bank’s name).
Financial Sanctions/Embargoes
LBBW is obligated to initiate measures to ensure
compliance with national and international financial
sanctions and embargo regulations. Financial sanctions result in restrictions to capital movements and
payments, whereas embargoes limit the freedom of
foreign trade.
51
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Corporate Governance.
Data Protection
Confidentiality in the handling of customer data is of
the utmost importance at LBBW. This is why LBBW’s
data protection officer reports directly to the member
of the Board of Managing Directors responsible for
risk management, compliance and auditing.
Each LBBW subsidiary has its own data protection
officer. They are organized in a working party comprising the compliance officers responsible for data protection at the branches and representative offices. The
annual report is incorporated in the annual Group data
protection report.
Two on-site audits of data destruction companies have
been performed. Further checks on system access
rights, observance of legal requirements with respect
to data protection in customer relations with credit card
service providers and discretionary measures at the
branches were also completed. The resultant recommendations were submitted to the responsible bodies.
A new data protection concept for IT applications
which must be reported to the Data Protection department was introduced. This concept is being implemented and continuously updated by the responsible
specialized division. In addition, rules were issued stipulating the development by the specialized divisions
of deletion concepts for personal data.
In 2014, 58 customer complaints (previous year 69)
and requests for information relating to data protection were processed.
Violations of Environmental Law
In 2014, the Bank did not incur any fines or penalties
resulting from non-compliance with statutory environmental regulations. During internal and external
audits, no substantive violations of environmental law
were uncovered.
52
LBBW takes account of key aspects of the German
Corporate Governance Code. This is a set of essential
statutory provisions governing the management and
monitoring of German listed companies and also
contains nationally and internationally recognized
standards for good and responsible corporate governance, including in the form of recommendations. Due
to its emphasis on listed stock corporations, the Code
is not applicable in all respects to Landesbank BadenWürttemberg, which is a non-listed credit institution
set up as a public-law institution (Anstalt des öffentlichen Rechts). Several provisions of the German Corporate Governance Code therefore can only be applied
analogously to Landesbank Baden-Württemberg. In
terms of content, LBBW’s corporate governance adheres
very closely to the spirit of the German Corporate
Governance Code. For this reason, there are special
provisions in the LBBW Act, the ordinance and in the
bylaws of the executive bodies and other committees
concerning many of the recommendations of the
German Corporate Governance Code.
At LBBW – particular after the change of governance
structure in 2010 – management and control rules
applicable to corporations are observed. In addition,
importance is attached to the availability of independent expertise. Although LBBW has the legal form of
an institution under public law, its corporate governance is the same as that of a private company. For
instance, the tasks of LBBW’s annual general meeting
and Supervisory Board are regulated as for a jointstock company although this is not the legal form of
LBBW. Furthermore, the members of the LBBW Board of
Managing Directors make their decisions independently
of any external instructions.
In the wake of the agreements reached with the EU
Commission on LBBW’s governance structure, among
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
other things, the independence of the Supervisory
Board Chairman required as of 15 December 2009 was
extended beyond the current term of office. Furthermore, the number of independent members of the
Supervisory Board was increased from seven to a total
of eight – including the Chairman of the Supervisory
Board – at the beginning of the period of office of the
second Supervisory Board. LBBW will be reporting on
the observance of these requirements up to and including 2020. Accordingly, the independent members of
the Supervisory Board of LBBW now account for more
than one-third of the total number of members.
This ensures that LBBW’s corporate governance does
not differ from that of its competitors, including in
view of the changes by the Commission to the original
state aid decision.
Remuneration of the Board of Managing Directors
In 2014, the remuneration of the members of LBBW’s
Board of Managing Directors comprised a non-performance-based fixed component, a variable performancebased component and other benefits (essentially the
use of a company car with driver). Moreover, the members of the Board of Managing Directors have a company pension.
In 2014, the members of the Board of Managing
Directors received fixed remuneration of a total of
EUR 4.88 million for the performance of their duties on
the Board. In addition, variable remuneration totaling
EUR 1.13 million was paid out. The sum total of other
benefits came to EUR 0.12 million. As at 31 December
2014, pension obligations according to IFRSs totaled
EUR 14.19 million for Board members serving as at the
reporting date.
The Supervisory Board makes decisions on the remuneration system and fixes the remuneration payable
to the Board of Managing Directors. The Compensation
Control Committee assumes an important advisory
role in this respect and prepares the decisions of the
Supervisory Board.
The focus of the system is on gearing remuneration
to the attainment of sustained economic performance
without offering incentives to take disproportionately
large risks. For this reason, the Supervisory Board has,
among other things, set a measurement period of
three years for variable remuneration and a ratio of
1:1 as a reasonable upper limit for the ratio of fixed to
variable remuneration.
The remuneration parameters that determine variable
remuneration are are aimed at sustainably reaching
the goals derived from the Bank’s strategy. The factors
used to calculate bonuses are the overall success of
the Group as well as the contributions to the Group’s
success by individual members of the Board of Managing Directors, which are measured and assessed
based on qualitative and quantitative factors. Contributions can be both positive and negative and affect
the variable remuneration accordingly. Sixty percent
of the annual variable remuneration is deferred over a
period of four years and paid pro rata temporis. This
can decrease or even be eliminated during this period
(penalty). Fifty percent of this deferred remuneration
depends on sustainable value growth. The retirement
benefits are essentially structured as defined-contribution benefits. Some members of the Board of Managing Directors have an arrangement taking the form of
a final salary scheme, the amount of which is calculated
according to the length of their service on the Board.
The Supervisory Board regularly reviews the appropriateness of the Board remuneration model as well as
the level and composition of the Board remuneration.
53
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Principles for Responsible
Investment.
By signing the United Nations’ Principles for Responsible
Investment (UN PRI), we agree to increasingly incorporate aspects of our responsibility for the environment
and society as well as corporate governance (environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG)) into
analysis and decision-making processes in our investment activities.
In addition to LBBW, almost 1,400 PRI signatories from
over 50 countries have agreed to voluntarily observe
these guidelines. Together they have assets under management currently totaling USD 59 trillion (April 2015).
We have implemented the following measures to date:
■ In 2011, sustainability criteria were defined for the
investment of LBBW’s free, unallocated equity. The
exclusion criteria include violations of labor laws,
child labor and human rights violations. The review
is conducted by the sustainability rating agency
oekom research AG and covers all interest-bearing
securities and borrower’s note loans placed directly
on the capital market. As at 31 December 2014,
these were valued at EUR 2.95 billion (19 % of the
total portfolio).
■ LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft
mbH excludes investments in producers of antipersonnel mines and cluster munitions from its investment funds. This criterion is based on the two
relevant UN conventions.
■ Since 2011, new investments or reallocation of
funds for the company pension system through the
additional retirement pension plan of LBBW (ZVKLBBW) have been subject to sustainability criteria.
■ LBBW has ceased the sale of investment products
associated with agricultural commodities. The
54
■
■
»LBBW Rohstoffe 1« and »LBBW Rohstoffe 2 LS«
funds withdrew from agricultural commodities
investments entirely in October 2012.
The »Sustainable Focus of the Issuer/Investment
Firm« criterion was added to the product review
process for the Retail Customers/Private Banking
segment. The issuers or investment companies
mentioned in our current product recommendations
have signed the PRI or agreed to be bound by comparable sustainability criteria.
With its active management, LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH exerts influence
on the companies in which it invests on behalf of
its customers. This is done through the transparent
exercise of voting rights at the annual general
meeting and via direct contact with the management. LBBW Asset Management works with an external service provider in the exercise of voting rights.
The voting rules (www.LBBW-AM.de/ueber-uns/
anlegerschutz/abstimmungspolitik.html) (in German
only) are based on the guidelines issued by Bundesverband Investment und Asset Management e. V.
(BVI) as well as the German Corporate Code. Direct
contact with management takes the form of individual conversations, meetings and participation in
conferences. There are around 600 company and
analyst contacts a year.
Implementing UN PRI requires LBBW to publish a transparency report annually. This Report can be inspected
at the UN PRI website: www.unpri.org.
PRI website on the German network:
www.unpri.org/areas-of-work/networks/germany/
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Voluntary Commitments in
Advertising.
Risk Management/
Reputation Risk Management.
We take care to ensure that all marketing measures fall
within the scope of generally accepted societal values
and the prevailing opinions about decency and morals
in society. Legal regulations pertaining to advertising,
such as the prohibition against advertising containing
dishonesty or misleading statements, are adhered
to strictly. In this regard, we primarily follow the
basic commercial communication guidelines of the
Deutscher Werberat (German Advertising Council
(www.werberat.de)).
Risk Management at LBBW is defined as the use of a
comprehensive range of tools to manage risks – including reputation risks – within the scope of LBBW’s potential to bear risk and the strategy laid down by the
Board of Managing Directors.
■ Group Communications, particularly the Press
Office, is responsible for the non-transaction-related
management of reputation risks.
■ The Corporate Sustainability and Health department
defines standards for all divisions for implementation of the Sustainability Policy.
■ The transaction-related management of reputation
risks, such as evaluating new business, is conducted
decentrally by the front-office units, especially in the
course of the new products process (NPP) and credit
application process. A product certification process
is carried out prior to the NPP for OTC derivatives
for interest rate, foreign exchange and commodities
management.
■ The Compliance division and the Corporate Sustainability and Health department assist the relevant
front-office units in identifying and assessing reputation risks in their everyday business.
Consequently, we were not issued with sanctions, fines
or warnings due to non-compliance with advertising
regulations in 2014.
Equitable Working Conditions.
We comply with the eight core labor standards of the
International Labour Organization governing equitable
working conditions for all of the LBBW Group’s employees (ILO, www.ilo.org).
Four basic principles drive the mission and work
of ILO:
■ freedom of association and collective bargaining
■ elimination of forced labor
■ eradication of child labor
■ elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.
The risk management guidelines set out the main
principles for the consideration of opportunities and
risks within the LBBW Group and form the basis of a
uniform Group-wide understanding of the Bank’s goals
in connection with risk management.
55
STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT
Wording of guidelines for reputation risk
Transactions which are liable to jeopardize the
Bank’s reputation on a sustained basis should be
avoided. The sustainability policy of the LBBW
Group must be observed.
The LBBW Group acts in the best and long-term
interests of its customers and stakeholders.
At the LBBW Group, ethical aspects, such as human
rights, environmental protection, working conditions and anti-corruption, are taken into account
when granting loans and making investments. It
goes without saying that the Bank does not support
any unlawful acts such as tax evasion and criminal
activities. The financing or hedging of deliveries of
arms, defense or dual-use goods to other countries
are subject to restrictions defined in the Bank’s
internal rules. Projects which are discernibly liable
to result in massive destruction of the environment
and natural surroundings and which do not simultaneously generate any added environmental value
are not supported.
Tax and regulatory requirements are considered
when concluding transactions in the Bank’s own
name and in customer relationships. Products,
which are in breach of such requirements, are not
offered or traded.
A detailed risk and opportunity report can be found
on p. 58 ff. of the 2014 LBBW Annual Report.
56
Responsibility and Commitment.
Commitment to
Sustainability.
Sustainability means bringing business success into
harmony with the social and environmental foundations of our community. Adding value in the truest
sense. By dedicating ourselves to our customers,
employees, society and the environment, we are contributing to a bright future and good quality of life
in the regions in which we do business. And creating
value sustainably.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Customers.
Inspiring, value enhancing,
reliable.
We attend to the needs of many of our customers throughout their
lifetimes – from their birth to school and beyond to the commencement of their career and then retirement, from starting a business to
expanding internationally. Mutual trust is the foundation for these
long-standing relationships. At LBBW, we focus on our customers.
If you want not only to invest your money, but do so
in a meaningful and sustainable way, we want to be a
reliable partner and driving force in this effort. We
provide financing to companies aiming to make sustainable projects and ideas a reality. And if you choose
to bring your ideals to life with a foundation, we can
provide guidance and resources.
58
Whether we are providing an investment or a financing
solution, our sustainability guidelines give us a framework for doing business. We place particular emphasis
on personalized, holistic advising that takes each customer’s individual ideas and goals into account. We
regularly conduct customer satisfaction surveys and
tests and have our performance certified by independent organizations to meet these quality standards to
the greatest degree possible. We are well aware that
the trust our customers place in our Bank must be
earned on a daily basis.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Raise the curtains!
Photographer: Wilhelm Mierendorf
Are we consuming our climate? What has DJ David
Guetta got to do with the energy turnaround? And
what does Swabian ravioli tell us about sustainability?
360 bemused and delighted visitors attended the
humorous presentations by scientists at the 1st Stuttgart Sustainability Slam. Each of them had a maximum
of ten minutes in which to present the results of their
latest research into sustainability in an entertaining
manner to a non-specialist audience.
student from Bietigheim-Bissingen,
who is studying transportation in
Berlin. He had prepared for a week,
rehearsing intensively two days prior
to the slam. »I wanted to create a
regional link, which is why I used
the 'Maultasche', Swabian ravioli,
as a symbol for sustainability«, he
said, explaining his approach. »Die
Glaubensfrage – Strategien für eine
nachhaltige Welt und den Verkehr«
(A Question of Faith – Strategies for
a Sustainable World and Transport)
was the title of his presentation.
Held in January 2015, the 1st Stuttgart Sustainability
Slam was organized by BW-Bank and Studienstiftung
Hütte. »BW-Bank is committed to sustainability. We
want to ensure that this subject receives broad coverage« says Ulrich Röhrle, head of the Private Banking
Center in Stuttgart City and the organizer of the soldout event. The campus atmosphere and live music attracted young visitors in particular. »Really cool«, was
the response on the part of the guests. »When will the
next slam be?«
Employing great charm and wit, the seven participants
of the slam presented scientific knowledge in a readily
understandable manner, arousing the audience’s interest in dry, yet exciting sustainability issues, such as
energy efficiency, micro energy harvesting and recycling of old vehicle parts. The greatest acclaim was
received by Trutz von Olnhausen, a 24-year-old Master’s
59
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Advising approach.
Future-oriented Solutions.
The goals and wishes of our customers are our top
priority. Integrated financial advice and support tailored to customer needs are very important to us.
Together with the customer, our customer relationship
managers explore the customer’s goals – including
those beyond investing – and subsequently prepare a
personalized financial plan. Long-term wealth accumulation and portfolio optimization are at the forefront
here.
The more mobile and flexible life becomes, the more
we as a provider of financial services must make ourselves available to our customers around the clock. We
already have numerous offerings allowing our customers to perform banking transactions independently of
branch opening hours. We offer innovative digital processes for simplifying and accelerating payments. As
well as this, we are involved in the development of
sustainable urban mobility concepts and operate a
crowdfunding platform for social projects. In this way,
we want to continue offering our customers the best
possible service and to shape the future sustainably
via innovations.
We provide detailed and readily understandable information about various forms of investment and any
associated risks. All advice given is documented in a
record of the meeting. Our advisors are not assigned
sales targets for individual securities products. There
are no point or unit systems at LBBW for assessing
sales and revenue targets. We advise and support our
customers on all financial matters in each phase of
their lives. This is because we know that reliable personal advice forms the best basis for sustained and
trusting customer relationships.
Our sustainable approach to advice and the rules for
systematic implementation and review are set out in
the »Leitlinien für die Privatkundenberatung in der
BW-Bank« (Guidelines for Retail Customer Advice at
BW-Bank) (www.bw-bank.de ➝ About us ➝ Awards).
Specific work instructions and process guidelines provide the framework for the advising process. Product
selection guidelines and review mechanisms ensure
that we always focus on the customer’s interests.
60
Online and Mobile Banking
Since 2011, BW-Bank has been offering its customers
electronic account statements, securities settlement
slips and credit card invoices via online banking. In
this way, account statements can be conveniently archived in a PDF format. The electronic mailbox ensures
secure communications.
Launched in 2013, the BW mobile banking app provides the core online banking functions (account balance, payment, account transfers) on smartphones as
well. Various other functions such as scanning of transfers via GiroCode, the storage of receipts (for guarantee or warranty claims) directly in the account balance
display and the opportunity to categorize transactions
offer great convenience and clarity. From 2015, this
»digitale Haushaltsbuch« (digital home budget) will
be available to all online banking users, offering them
extensive analysis and export functions, an integrated
budget planner and other conveniences.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Sustainable Products,
Sustainable Action.
Video advice
Since summer 2014, our advisory team at the BW-Bank
Service Center has been available for customers not
only via the telephone but additionally also via text or
video chat. The trained financial advisors provide the
full range of services of a conventional branch such
as the opening of a new account, investment advice or
home loans. Video advice is available until 8:00 p.m.
on workdays and 2:00 p.m. on Saturdays and can be
accessed from any commercially available PC without
the need for any additional software.
polygoCard
As a development partner for an innovative service
card for Stuttgart, we want to make a contribution to
shaping the future of urban life on a sustainable basis
and to encourage citizens to adopt electromobility.
The multifunction card, which will initially only be
available to VVS season-ticket holders in 2015, is a
world premiere: it is an electronic ticket, a key for
(electric) car-sharing vehicles and a card for electricity
charging terminals and can also be used for global
payments for all merchants accepting MasterCard –
including on a contact-free basis. In the future, it
will also be possible to use it to access city facilities,
for example by acting as a library card in libraries.
BW-Bank is responsible for implementing the innovative payment function of the polygoCard pay (see also
p. 107).
bw crowd
Accomplishing something together – that’s the idea
behind the crowdfunding platform at www.bw-crowd.
Since 2014, the platform has been supporting efforts
to raise funds for small social and cultural projects via
the Internet (see also p. 100).
Is my money invested well? This consideration no longer
refers simply to returns but also to the question, »What
is my bank financing with my money?« The idea of
achieving financial targets in conformity with a personal ethical stance as well as social and environmental objectives is gaining traction in Germany. Whereas
a sum of EUR 5 billion was held in sustainable investments in 2005, a decade later, this figure had risen 25fold to EUR 127.3 billion at the end of 2014 in Germany
according to the 2014 Market Report on Sustainable
Investments published by Forum Nachhaltige Geldanlagen (FNG). This marks a respectable 59 % increase
over the previous year but also reflects the broader
market coverage and improved data basis.
Everything suggests that this positive trend will continue
in the future. Sustainable investment will grow in importance according to a forecast published by oekom
research in its Corporate Responsibility Review 2015.
Even so, in a European comparison Germany’s performance is still modest. According to the calculations of
the European industry association Eurosif, a total of just
under EUR 9.9 trillion had been invested in accordance
with ESG (ecological, social and corporate governance)
criteria at the end of 2013. The Global Sustainable
Investment Review puts the international figure at
around EUR 19 trillion.
Actively taking responsibility and showing commitment pays off for customers, companies and the Bank.
Sustainable investment strategies are more than merely
ethically motivated. They are return generators, simultaneously reducing financial risk, as documented by
various research reports. Given the historically low
interest rates,
61
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Sustainable Investment Products.
investors are increasingly focusing on sustainable corporate bonds. The inclusion of sustainability ratings
in the selection of bonds reduces risk and improves
investment success according to an analysis performed by oekom research.
Receiving a good sustainability rating and being
included in sustainability indices and funds is considered by most major corporations to be a strategic
must. It improves the company’s reputation among
stakeholders and financial analysts, and goes handin-hand with a better credit rating and lower financing
charges, a study by the Centre for European Economic
Research found. For financial institutions, sustainability issues play a significant role in credit risk analysis
today – not only in view of the public pressure to
minimize reputation risks but also based on their own
ethical stance.
We actively encourage this interest in sustainable investments and raise public awareness of the concept
of sustainability at our internal and external events
(see p. 38 f.). All our investment and lending services
are based on our Guidelines for Sustainability (see
p. 14 ff.). They help us to reduce risk with respect to
sustainability aspects and to allow us to disproportionately benefit from the corresponding opportunities. Our goal is ultimately to support our customers
to the greatest extent possible in investing their assets
in a responsible, environmentally friendly and ethical
manner and to prove again and again that financial
returns can be combined with value creation for the
benefit of society and the environment.
62
We offer retail and institutional customers (e. g. insurance companies, investment companies, foundations
and church organizations) an extensive portfolio of
sustainable investment products. Among other things,
we voluntarily apply sustainability criteria to our portfolio. For instance, LBBW ceased the sale of investment
products associated with agricultural commodities.
Our asset management customers have the option of
remaining true to their entirely individual ethical
stance in their investments.
Sustainable Retail Investment Funds/
Environmental Funds
In addition to several specialized sustainable investment funds for institutional customers, LBBW Asset
Management manages two sustainable retail investment funds and one climate change fund:
■ The »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« equity fund
invests in companies worldwide that stand out due
to their above-average involvement in sustainability
issues.
■ »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten« invests in government
bonds, covered bonds, and corporate and sovereign
bonds that exhibit above-average performance in
terms of sustainability.
■ The LBBW Global Warming climate change fund invests in the stocks of companies that offer products
and services that work to counteract global warming or mitigate its ecological and economic effects.
The composition of the investment universe for both
the »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« fund and the »LBBW
Nachhaltigkeit Renten« fund is based on sustainability
ratings issued by Munich-based oekom research AG,
one of the world’s leading independent rating agencies
in the sustainable investment segment. Both funds
follow a very strict sustainability approach in which
the best-in-class method is combined with extensive
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
exclusion criteria (negative screening). In this way,
the funds fulfill not only the requirements of churches,
pension funds and other sustainability-oriented investors, but also offer good prospects for outperforming
the market by avoiding ethical, political and environmental risks.
Awards
The »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« fund was the first
sustainable fund launched in Germany to be awarded
the European transparency logo for sustainable
retail investment funds in June 2009 and every year
since then.
■ The »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten« bond fund
received permission to use the logo on 1 May 2010.
This seal identifies funds that disclose their investment criteria and research process as well as their
investment policies.
■ The »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« and »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten« funds were test winners in ÖkoTest magazine’s 10/2012 issue.
■ In October 2012, the Austrian ministry of the environment awarded these two funds the Austrian Ecolabel with nearly the highest possible number of
points.
■ After adding the LBBW Global Warming fund, the
sustainable investing committee of Care Group AG
also added the »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien« and
»LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten« funds to the SRI
universe of socially responsible investment funds
in 2012 and therefore recommended these funds
as a sustainable investment. The Swiss company
analyzes and evaluates sustainable funds worldwide.
■
BW ZukunftsSparbrief
Retail customers can help finance community and
environmental projects with the BW ZukunftsSparbrief
(savings bond). Each euro invested promotes lending
to sustainable projects and innovations that contribute
greatly to ensuring a bright future and good quality of
life in the Stuttgart region as well as in Baden-Württemberg as a whole. These include investments in energyefficient construction and renovation, renewable energies, environmental technologies, organic food, green
IT, green mobility, forest management and natural cosmetics as well as projects by non-profit organizations.
The selection criteria for awarding assistance for projects were developed along with prominent environmental, community and scientific organizations in the
public sector. The BW ZukunftsSparbrief gives customers a secure annual return over a term of 3 ¾ years. In
2014, customers invested a total of EUR 8 million in
this product. We primarily used the proceeds for loans
for energy-efficient construction and renovation.
Sustainable Certificates
The »LBBW Sustainability Safe-Anleihe mit Cap« product (date of inception: 30 March 2010; date of maturity:
1 April 2015) combines the qualities of a sustainable
investment with a high degree of safety. The bond is
based on the EURO STOXX Sustainability Index, a
sustainability index which follows environmental
and social, as well as financial, criteria in selecting
companies.
By acquiring the »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Strategie-Zertifikat« certificate (date of inception: 15 June 2007,
unlimited term), our customers are investing in companies that gain a competitive advantage by balancing
economic, environmental and social goals.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Our customers can profit from the stock price performance of selected companies in the solar energy industry thanks to the »LBBW Solar-Zertifikat« certificate
(launched on 8 October 2007, unlimited term).
Investors can also take advantage of our expertise in
selecting promising underlying instruments.
Green Bonds
Green bonds are issued to fund sustainable investment
projects. This market has grown quickly over the past
few years. The ICMA (International Capital Markets
Association) established the Green Bond Principles to
ensure integrity and heighten transparency for investors. These principles define a voluntary standard for
the issuance of green bonds. The aim is to encourage
standardization, integrity and transparency in the market for green bonds. To this end, the Green Bond Principles provide recommendations, including for the use
of the issue proceeds. LBBW signed up to the Green
Bond Principles in September 2014. On 17 September
2014, Münchener Hypothekenbank eG issued a sustainable mortgage-backed covered bond (ESG covered
bond). This is the world’s first covered bond whose
cover stock is selected on the basis of ecological, social
and politico-societal sustainability criteria. LBBW underwrote the issue and placed it with investors.
LBBW was again active in this market segment in 2015.
Thus, in April 2015, it underwrote the issue of a green
covered bond by Berlin Hyp. The issue proceeds are
being used to fund existing commercial green building
loans and future loans for new green buildings.
LBBW has also underwritten several sustainable bonds
in the market for supranational, government and publicsector issues, in which green bonds are far more
established compared with bank issues. In particular,
LBBW has successfully placed several climate awareness bonds in the market for the European Investment
64
Bank. In addition, it underwrote an award-winning
green bond for Landwirtschaftliche Rentenbank in
connection with a private placement.
Alternative Asset Investments with a Sustainable
Focus
After intensive review and placement approval, alternative asset investments (formerly closed-end funds)
are offered by BW-Bank and the savings banks as an
investment opportunity for high net-worth retail customers. The focus has broadened substantially over
the last few years. Independently of the provider, investments are selected according to a specified review
procedure while taking sustainability into account.
Although alternative asset investments with a sustainability focus formerly mostly comprised investments
in the renewable energy sector, the real estate funds
offered in 2014 feature sustainable construction
methods and environmental certificates, for instance,
as firm selection criteria.
Asset Management According to Ethical, Social and
Environmental Criteria
In its asset management activities, BW-Bank applies
sustainability-oriented criteria in structuring portfolios
on request. To this end, an updated investment universe is supplied quarterly by the rating agency oekom
research AG, which BW-Bank’s asset managers use to
select investments for individual portfolios. As at 30
December 2014, we managed assets of EUR 95 million
based on sustainability criteria. Independent tests
have repeatedly found our asset management activities to be exemplary.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Sustainable and Environmental Investment Products at a Glance.*
EUR million
30 June 2012
30 June 2013
31 Dec. 2014*
LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH
Funds
■
LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien
■
■
■
LBBW AM: Spezialfonds Nachhaltigkeit
19.1
10.8
23.3
LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten
45.7
19.5
32.3
LBBW Global Warming
44.4
42.1
27.1
383.5
459.5
541.9
492.71
531.92
624.63
0.03
0.04
0.06
0.2
0.1
0.1
Total
LBBW Certificates
■
LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Strategie-Zertifikat
■
LBBW Solar-Zertifikat
■
LBBW Sustainability Safe-Anleihe mit Cap
Total
3.6
3.4
3.0
3.83
3.54
3.16
BWEquity GmbH
Alternative asset investments in renewable energy funds
(including forest funds)
■
Capital placed
100.64
109.95
112.06
■
Borrowed capital (assumed initial leverage of approx. 70 %)
234.64
256.45
261.46
■
Total investment
335.24
366.35
373.46
29.87
44.18
95.09
Asset Management
■
Total assets managed under sustainability-oriented criteria according
to oekom research AG
BW ZukunftsSparbrief
■
Total funds invested
8
* In the future the figures will be shown as at 31 December and thus in line with other published data (such as environmental data and personnel ratios).
1 Equals a share of approximately 2 % of the total assets under management (AuM) of LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
2 Equals a share of approximately 1.4 % of the total assets under management (AuM) of LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
3 Equals a share of approximately 1.1 % of the total assets under management (AuM) of LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
4 Period from 2001 to 30 June 2012.
5 Period from 2001 to 30 June 2013.
6 Period from 2001 to 30 December 2014.
7 Corresponds to 0.83 % of the total AuM of Asset Management.
8 Corresponds to 1.1 % of the total AuM of Asset Management.
9 Corresponds to 1.6 % of the total AuM of Asset Management.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Although the market for sustainable investments has
grown in recent years, the share of the total German
market is still only around 2.2 %. The total assets
managed or invested sustainably at LBBW is 1.9 %
(Asset Management) and 1.1 % (LBBW Asset Management) of total invested capital, respectively.
Between 31 December 2011 and 31 December 2014,
the funds structured by LBBW Asset Management
Investmentgesellschaft mbH performed as follows:
■ »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien R tranche
+36.4 %
(retail investors)«
■ »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Aktien I tranche
+40.9 %
(institutional investors)«
■ »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten R tranche«
+18.2 %
■ »LBBW Nachhaltigkeit Renten I tranche«
+17.2 %
■ »LBBW Global Warming«
+39.8 %
We still see enormous potential in the field of sustainable investments and therefore intend to market sustainable products in additional asset classes. In addition, we organize events on sustainability issues and
participate in trade shows on the subject to encourage
an increasing number of investors to try sustainable
products (see p. 38 f.).
As well as this, we take account of sustainability criteria in our conventional investment products and are
attempting to increasingly incorporate ESG aspects
in our product selection and structuring processes
(see p. 54 f.).
66
In many asset classes, sustainability criteria are playing an increasingly important role in the assessment
of the economic viability of investment projects. Thus,
certified energy-efficient and sustainable buildings are
becoming established as the standard in real estate
funds. We offer our retail customers two funds – WestInvest InterSelect and Deka-ImmobilienGlobal – more
than 50 % of whose portfolio comprises certified buildings.
Foundation Management
When people use their capital for the good of society
or the environment, they deserve the best possible
support. From the initial idea of forming a foundation
to managing their assets, we help donors effectively
realize their commitment. To do so, we develop customized solutions that extend far beyond standard
banking services. We currently advise around 670
foundations with total assets of EUR 3.3 billion.
BW-Bank, which is also responsible within the LBBW
Group for foundation management for LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank customers, is
among the top providers of these services in Germany.
Our expertise in foundation management is regularly
recognized. Thus, BW-Bank achieved top place again
for the fourth time in five years in the well-respected
FUCHSBRIEFE Test 2015. The purpose was to select
asset managers for »Haus des Stiftens«, a non-profit
organization which develops practical aid for civic
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
commitment. These asset managers are managing
two funds which pool foundation assets as a single
portfolio. Pooling foundation assets is a lucrative idea
particularly in times of tight budgets. In this way, foundations with limited means can invest in the same way
as those with assets in the millions. BW-Bank asset
management will be managing one of these two
pooled funds in collaboration with LBBW Asset Management. In its announcement of the award, the jury
praised the outstanding quality of the investment of
foundation assets in investment recommendations,
portfolio quality, transparency and services offered as
well as the convincing presentation of the solution to
the jury and the members of the foundation boards in
Munich.
Money and good intentions alone are not enough
to achieve the goals of a foundation effectively. In
order to help founders better unlock the potential
impact of their foundations and projects, we started
a »Wirkungsworkshop für Einsteiger« (Effectiveness
Workshop for Beginners). Along with PHINEO, an independent analysis and consulting firm for effective
social involvement, we train representatives from nonprofit organizations in the basics of impact studies,
measurement and logic.
We give foundation leaders the impetus to try mission
investing to ensure not only that their foundations are
serving a good cause, but that the investment of the
assets is also having a positive effect. To accomplish
this, foundation assets must be strategically managed
to fulfill the foundation’s mission while they are being
invested. Supporting non-profit organizations by extending loans is one of the many possible examples.
Our publication, which is called »Stiftungsmanagement
– Impulse für Stiftungen« (Foundation Management –
Inspiration for Foundations), is issued semi-annually
and has a circulation of 5,000. The magazine provides
donors (and those who wish to become donors) with
new ideas and projects, as well as valuable foundation
and tax law information. Sustainability has been a firm
element of this magazine since 2015, with each issue
containing an article on these matters.
Our foundation portal (www. bw-bank.de/stiftungen,
in German only) offers foundations a free platform for
publicizing their work. More than 330 foundations are
currently taking advantage of this opportunity.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Financing.
Our broad range of financing solutions supports the
sustainable development of companies, promotes
projects in renewable energies and other fields and
provides chances for retail customers to make their
homes energy-efficient.
Exclusion of Reputation and Sustainability Risks in
Financing
One major component of our business field strategy
is the provision of advisory services for small- to
medium-sized corporate customers in the German
states of Baden-Württemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate
and Saxony as well as neighboring economic areas.
We also extend financing to companies worldwide,
particularly in regions that offer sufficient potential
earnings and whose economic stability yields a positive risk profile, as well as in countries with growth
potential.
Our Guidelines for Sustainability set the standards for
lending in conjunction with the Lending Guidelines.
The Lending Guidelines contain the general rules of
conduct and form the basis for internal and external
activities in lending business. They act as a guide for
our employees in their handling of lending risks. The
inclusion of economic, ecological, social and ethical
factors in lending decisions is enshrined in these
Guidelines.
Key measures in this connection include
■ The review process for industry-country risks that
has been integrated into the rules of lending to corporate customers as a supplement to the existing
rules concerning environmental risks. The goal is to
identify critical industry-country combinations and,
by doing so, bring to light sustainability risks (e. g.
activities in protected areas or violations of fair
68
■
labor rules). This review is conducted under certain
conditions for the mining, bioenergy, oil/gas and
forest/paper industries.
The implementation of systematic principles for
exports of weapons and dual-use goods. LBBW
does not finance the delivery of weapons of war to
other countries.
A country and product matrix on the LBBW Intranet
contains all of the relevant internal standards for
cross-border business in order to harmonize the
review process and render it more efficient. The overview contains details of financial sanctions, embargos,
critical industry/country combinations due to sustainability and reputation risks, arms/defense/dual-use
goods and country strategies.
LBBW does not enter into any business relationships
with companies that produce cluster munitions and/or
anti-personnel mines, which are prohibited by international conventions. We ensure this at the operational
level with a company exclusion list that applies
throughout the entire Group and is also integrated
into the automated embargo monitoring system of the
Bank. The exclusion list is continuously updated based
on an external database.
Where environmental factors are involved in project
financing deals, statutory standards for protecting the
environment often exist in our target countries, the
implementation of which is generally the prerequisite
for a project receiving approval. Only when a project
has been approved and compliance with environmental
protection standards is ensured do we disburse a loan.
Moreover, we extend credit with environmental conditions attached, if necessary – for example, a contractual
obligation to dismantle equipment or the obligation to
obtain insurance against environmental risks.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Risk Management in Real Estate and
Project Financing
Real estate and project financing are subject to particularly stringent quality management due to their complex financing structures and high loan volumes. In
the Risk Management Real Estate and Project Financing unit, management processes are periodically
reviewed by way of internal audits – sometimes with
external auditors – and continually updated. All of
the employees of the unit responsible for this type
of financing have obtained additional qualifications
by attending the requisite risk management training.
We provide assistance to residential real estate companies in applying for grants under programs offered by
Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW). By passing on
the approved KfW funds, we assume the corresponding risk. Indirectly, this enables us to contribute to the
availability of energy-efficient and affordable housing.
We also participate in financing urban development
projects and projects to restructure residential neighborhoods.
Risk Management with Foreign Financial Service
Providers
A proactive approach is adopted for risk analysis and
management for foreign banks and insurance companies as well as European investment funds (financial
institutions and sovereigns). In particular, country risks
are analyzed and assessed on the basis of the Guidelines for Sustainability and the country and product
matrix.
Promotion of Renewable Energies and
Energy Efficiency
As a whole, our project financing portfolio declined in
2014. This was due to the generally weaker market,
which also affected LBBW. The proportion of project
finance in the renewable energies segment rose slightly and now accounts for almost 50 % of the entire portfolio.
LBBW again financed a number of wind farms in Germany. In addition, we were able to provide finance for
some interesting grid investments. Thus, in its role as
sole lender, LBBW structured and financed the sale of
the Stuttgart energy grid back to the municipality. As
a result, Stadtwerke Stuttgart, a wholly owned subsidiary of the city, was able to acquire the city’s electricity
and gas grids from EnBW. EnBW subsidiary BW GmbH
reduced its share to 25.1 %. The purchase price of
EUR 159 million was financed through the inclusion
of promotional loans provided by KfW with a debt
capital component of EUR 79 million over a period
of 20 years.
We assist retail customers in renovating and modernizing buildings in line with energy-efficiency requirements and arrange related advisory services. In this
connection, we work with Deutsches EnergieberaterNetzwerk e. V. (DEN) and Energieberatungszentrum
(Energy Consulting Center) Stuttgart. In addition, we
support the »Zukunft Altbau« (Existing Construction
for the Future) initiative, an information campaign by
Baden-Württemberg’s Ministry of the Environment,
Climate Protection and the Energy Sector on energyefficient renovation of existing buildings.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
We facilitate straightforward financing of smaller projects up to EUR 30,000 with the »BW Modernisierungskredit«, a prefinancing loan combined with an LBS
home loan savings plan as the repayment vehicle. This
enables retail customers to carry out energy-saving
renovations in owner-occupied or leased properties at
low interest rates and without unnecessary bureaucracy.
»BW Modernisierungsvorsorge« helps customers to
accumulate capital for future modernization activities
via a home loan savings plan, allowing them to obtain
a favorably priced home loan to cover additional capital requirements, including small loan amounts.
We also specifically point out the possibility of publicsector grants during consultations. One focus is on
the grant programs offered by Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW), including the Energy Efficient Refurbishment, Energy-Efficient Construction and Solar
Power Generation programs. Additionally, we offer
the corresponding development loan programs by
Landeskreditbank Baden-Württemberg (L-Bank) such
as the energy efficiency financing programs.
70
In 2014, LBBW approved total loans of EUR 960 million
for private energy-efficiency measures both via its
own distribution channels and via the savings banks;
consequently, it is easily the market leader in its core
markets.
We also refer our corporate clients to services to improve energy efficiency by request. In this connection,
we use the services of external experts to calculate
savings potential. We work with external partners to
ensure that full use is made of the available funding
possibilities.
The commercial environmental finance handled by
LBBW via its own distribution channels or for the
savings banks for optimizing resource and energy
efficiency reached a record level of EUR 1.1 billion
in 2014. In LBBW’s core markets, the Savings Bank
Organization received more than 50 % of total funding
volumes in 2014.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Project Finance – Total
Credit Facilities Drawn by Region
As at 31 Dec. 2013
Total volume: EUR 5.37 billion
Germany (52.4 %)
Europe, not including Germany (34.3 %)
Americas (8.4 %)
Middle East (4.8 %)
Far East (0.04 %)
Credit Facilities Drawn by Sector
As at 31 Dec. 2013
Total volume: EUR 5.37 billion
Renewable energies (48.8 %)
Conventional energies (12.9 %)
PPP1 (27.6 %)
Commodities industry (2.6 %)
Logistics, grids and pipelines (7.5 %)
Other (0.6 %)
1 PPP
Credit Facilities Drawn by Region
As at 31 Dec. 2014
Total volume: EUR 5.17 billion
Germany (55.1 %)
Europe, not including Germany (35.0 %)
Americas (5.4 %)
Middle East (4.5 %)
Credit Facilities Drawn by Sector
As at 31 Dec. 2014
Total volume: EUR 5.17 billion
Renewable energies (49.2 %)
Conventional energies (11.5 %)
PPP1 (26.5 %)
Commodities industry (1.6 %)
Logistics, grids and pipelines (10.5 %)
Other (0.6 %)
= Public Private Partnership: contractual partnership between public and private entities.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Project Finance – Renewables
Credit Facilities Drawn by Region
As at 31 Dec. 2013
Total volume: EUR 2.62 billion
Germany (47.4 %)
Western Europe, not including Germany (44.5 %)
Americas (5.1 %)
Middle East (3.1 %)
Credit Facilities Drawn by Type of Energy
As at 31 Dec. 2013
Total volume: EUR 2.62 billion
Solar (55.4 %)
Wind (43.2 %)
Biogas/biomass (1.3 %)
Geothermal (0.1 %)
72
Credit Facilities Drawn by Region
As at 31 Dec. 2014
Total volume: EUR 2.54 billion
Germany (47.4 %)
Western Europe, not including Germany (45.5 %)
Americas (4.1 %)
Middle East (3.0 %)
Credit Facilities Drawn by Type of Energy
As at 31 Dec. 2014
Total volume: EUR 2.54 billion
Solar (53.9 %)
Wind (45.1 %)
Biogas/biomass (1.0 %)
Geothermal (0.1 %)
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
Energy – Overall Breakdown
As at 31 Dec. 2014
Total volume: EUR 3.38 billion
Solar (40.6 %)
Wind (33.9 %)
Gas (14.4 %)
Coal (4.2 %)
Oil & Gas (3.4 %)
Electricity & Gas (2.3 %)
Biogas (0.7 %)
Waste (0.4 %)
Geothermal (0.1 %)
BW extend Checking Account.
For many years now, BW-Bank’s customers have benefited from BW extend, a checking account offered at a
reasonable monthly flat rate with a host of attractive
benefits.
BW extend customers receive perks such as one free
month of travel when they order their first annual
season ticket from the Stuttgart Transit and Tariff
Association (VVS). Account holders can also use the
»Flinkster« car-sharing system and the »Call-a-Bike«
bicycle rental system at preferential rates.
Further information can be found at:
www.extendshop.de (only available in German).
Quality Management.
Our quality management systems are an effective tool
for systematically translating mistakes into opportunities and improvements. Our quality managers systematically analyze our performance from our customers’
perspective. Key indicators are the customer complaints and claims we receive, as well as customer
feedback from the opinion cards we provide at our
branches. This information is combined with the
results of regularly conducted market research,
assessments of advising quality by test customers
and observation of major competitors.
Complaint management is a key component in evaluating and optimizing performance. In 2013 and 2014,
the number of customer complaints to the Board of
Managing Directors was well down on the previous
years. These complaints nearly always arise from an
individual business situation between the customer
and the Bank. In particular, the number of complaints
concerning advice received on securities and investments has dropped significantly in the past few years.
No complaints relating to ecological or sustainability
matters were received. Complaint management is
mandatory under the German Securities Trading Act.
Securities brokerage firms must »have in place effective and transparent procedures for the reasonable
and prompt handling of complaints received from
retail customers and keep a record of each complaint
and the measures taken for its resolution«. Our complaint management activities fulfill this requirement in
every respect, a fact confirmed in audits by regulators
over the years.
Our expectation of high quality in our advising processes extends to our services as well. For many years,
Sales Retail Customers/Private Banking has worked
intensively to continually improve our service quality.
Although banking transactions are increasingly being
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
conducted online today, many of our customers still
consider the bank branch a key point of contact to
»their« bank. For this reason, we support our branches
with special coaching. In a preliminary step, the service provided by the branch staff is monitored on site.
Employees then receive direct, personal feedback together with concrete, branch-specific recommendations for improving customer service quality.
Customer Satisfaction.
Our retail customers are surveyed annually by an independent market research firm. The results of the 2014
customer satisfaction survey, in which 11,832 retail
customers of BW-Bank participated, indicate that our
employees did an excellent job in a persistently difficult market.
■
■
A total of 93 % of customers reporting being satisfied on the whole (»satisfied«, »very satisfied« or
»completely satisfied«). 96 % rated service and 94 %
the advisors accordingly.
The study delivers detailed individual results
for more than 100 branches and private banking
centers that we use to hone our advisory services.
These high satisfaction levels have also been reflected
for many years in the opinion cards which are available
for completion at the branches. In direct contacts, our
staff are able to impress customers with their expertise,
friendliness, promptness and reliability. When asked
how friendly the service was, around 98 % of customers
rated it »very good« or »good«.
Continual Commitment to Quality
In addition to customer satisfaction surveys, BW-Bank
regularly conducts »mystery shopping« at its branches. This procedure is used primarily to test the quality
of the advising and services provided. The results of
74
test transactions are systematically analyzed and discussed in workshops, and implemented in initiatives
aimed at improving LBBW’s services and advising.
In order to maintain the high quality of advising that
we provide, we invest continually in the professional
expertise of our employees. The seven-month »Financial Consultant« course at the Frankfurt School of
Finance & Management is mandatory for the approximately 400 investment advisors at BW-Bank. Many of
our investment advisors even hold further qualifications as »Financial Planners« or »Certified Financial
Planners«.
The in-service training course »Certified Finance
Advisor BW-Bank« (certified by Sparkassenakademie
Baden-Württemberg) ensures that BW-Bank’s roughly
600 financial advisors provide competent advice. The
course conveys theoretical knowledge and advisory
skills in a practically oriented way and is guded by
the profile of requirements of the financial advisor.
Sustainability also forms part of the course. Re-certification is necessary every three years to ensure that
quality levels are maintained in the interests of sustainability.
LBBW’s Corporate Customer division has also developed a training program culminating in corporate
banking certification in conjunction with the ESB
Business School of Reutlingen University. Customer
advisors who successfully complete this program
consisting of lectures, workshops/case studies and
presentations by LBBW and external lecturers are
designated »Certified Corporate Consultants«. Among
other things, the training program provides in-depth
information on current customer requirements and
covers selected topics from the customer perspective.
Sustainability is also one of the topics in the course.
This new certification makes LBBW a trendsetter in
Germany in this field.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | CUSTOMERS
DISQ Service Test: Best Advising in Stuttgart
In 2014, BW-Bank again achieved top ranking amongst
the Stuttgart branch networks in the service test performed by Deutsches Institut für Service-Qualität
(DISQ – German Service Quality Institute), achieving
very good results. BW-Bank employees scored particularly highly in the integrated requirements analysis,
competent individual advice and their very good communication skills. Special mention was also made of
their friendly demeanor and the pleasant atmosphere
in which talks were held. Commissioned by TV broadcaster n-tv, DISQ examines six branch networks in
ten German cities each year. The anonymous testers
request advice on pension savings, home loans, investments, checking accounts and installment loans.
Certification: Senior-friendly Service
In May 2013, StadtSeniorenRat Stuttgart e. V. (Stuttgart
City Seniors’ Council e.V.) certified over 70 branches
of BW-Bank in the state capital of Stuttgart as seniorfriendly. Accordingly, they are permitted to hold the
»Senior-Friendly Service« certificate until 2016. The
review panel’s decision was based on a large number
of criteria ranging from needs-based and age-appropriate services, to the service provided by staff, to
construction measures and the option of house calls.
»Bank Consultation Hours« for Senior Citizens
In 2014, we established »bank consultation hours« in
retirement homes to reach elderly people who have
difficulty traveling to their local BW-Bank branch but
still want to retain their independence. Advisors and
service manages regularly help residents with all types
of financial matters and questions – from bank transfers and cash withdrawal to securities transactions and
powers of attorney.
75
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Employees.
Versatile, flexible, committed.
Sustainable human resources
management is a decisive determinant of our future viability.
Systematically promoting talent, attracting responsible
junior management staff and further developing all
employees’ professional and social skills are important
strategic steps for long-term success.
We help each individual develop their skills and make
the most of existing potential. Life-long learning is par
for the course as far as we are concerned. We are convinced that qualifications and continuing education
provide the key underpinnings for professional development. We specifically promote career opportunities
for women to increase their numbers in executive
positions.
76
To provide the best possible work-life balance, we
offer various options for flexible working hours as well
as the option of a temporary absence. Just as we offer
child care facilities for parents, so too do we help staff
who need to care for elderly or disabled family members.
We are aware of the importance of good working
conditions and internal balance as a basis for doing a
good job. For this reason, we invest in health, performance capacity and team spirit across all age groups.
Our goal is for our employees to enjoy working for us.
They are our most important resource and the key to
shaping a successful future.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
In good hands.
had been a mistake. Events had left him completely
unprepared. But then he discovered on the LBBW
Intranet a seminar titled »Pflegefall, was nun?« (Care
required, what now?). This seminar provided an overview of care possibilities, funding and advisory offices.
»The timing was perfect«, the 51-year-old recalls.
71 % of the 2.6 million people in need of care in
Germany are looked after at home mostly by members
of their own family. According to the forecasts in the
German Federal Government’s demographics report,
2.9 million people are expected to be dependent on
care by 2020, with this figure set to rise to 3.4 million
in 2030.
© Thinkstock by Getty Images
Suddenly everything had changed. LBBW employee
Jürgen P. faced a Herculean task. His mother-in-law,
who suffered from Parkinson’s, had fallen and broken
the bone in her thigh. At almost the same time, his
father-in-law suffered a stroke, which left one side of
his body paralyzed. He was abruptly ripped out of his
daily routine. Suddenly, everything needed to be done
at once: visits to his unwell parents-in-law, consultations with the authorities, application forms, search
for care staff and shopping. Hovering over all of this
was the question as to who was going to cover the
costs.
When times are good, the issue of caring for the
elderly is frequently neglected. Jürgen P. had often
wondered how long his parents-in-law would continue
to be able to look after themselves. But since they
were both fit, he had discarded these unpleasant
thoughts. However, it was now apparent that this
LBBW has numerous offerings for employees looking
after disabled family members or those in need of
care. »We pursue a human resources policy which is
oriented to all phases of life. This means that we help
employees achieve the right balance between family
and their jobs in all situations«, explains LBBW Diversity
Officer Sabine Schiffer. Thus, employees can apply for
additional leave of up to six months over and above
the statutory care period. It is also possible to reduce
working hours for up to 24 months or to work from
home. An open ear, psychosocial advice and also
support when talking to the responsible manager are
available from the Social Services Department. As well
as this, the »Care« online community on the LBBW
Intranet offers a platform for sharing with others. »It
was good to be able to find other colleagues who had
experienced similar things during this difficult period«,
says Jürgen P., looking back in gratitude. »The Bank
became more than just an employer for me. It became
a place where I could find people able to help me.«
77
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Personnel Figures.
The number of employees in the LBBW Group decreased
to 11,117 as at 31 December 2014. LBBW (Bank) counted
9,292 employees on this date. The following tables
contain annual comparisons of all personnel figures.
Personnel Figures for the LBBW Group (as at 31 Dec. of each year)
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Employees
Employees, total according to IFRS (International
Financial Reporting Standards)
thererof: women
thereof: men
13,061
12,231
11,642
11,308
11,117
6,689 (51 %)
6,311 (52 %)
6,043 (52 %)
6,005 (53 %)
5,850 (53 %)
6,372 (49 %)
5,920 (48 %)
5,599 (48 %)
5,303 (47 %)
5,267 (47 %)
Full-time employees
10,352 (79 %)
9,568 (78 %)
9,024 (78 %)
8,677 (77 %)
8,431 (76 %)
Part-time employees
2,709 (21 %)
2,663 (22 %)
2,618 (22 %)
2,631 (23 %)
2,686 (24 %)
2,437 (90 %)
2,392 (90 %)
2,382 (91 %)
2,426 (92 %)
2,484 (92 %)
272 (10 %)
271 (10 %)
236 (9 %)
205 (8 %)
202 (8 %)
590 (5 %)
535 (4.4 %)
502 (4.3 %)
479 (4.2 %)
462 (4.2 %)
Trainees
77
96
127
172
204
No. of fixed-term employees
49
80
89
42
17
No. of temporary employees
42
41
37
47
44
41.6
42.1
42.3
42.4
42.8
126 (1 %)
138 (1 %)
150 (1 %)
152 (1 %)
171 (2 %)
51 – 60 years
2,350 (20 %)
2,334 (21 %)
2,294 (21 %)
2,215 (21 %)
2,407 (24 %)
41 – 50 years
4,045 (34 %)
3,928 (36 %)
3,915 (36 %)
3,842 (38 %)
3,671 (36 %)
31 – 40 years
3,323 (28 %)
2,933 (27 %)
2,791 (26 %)
2,657 (26 %)
2,443 (24 %)
25 – 30 years
1,352 (11 %)
1,161 (11 %)
1,116 (10 %)
1,072 (10 %)
1,076 (11 %)
576 (5 %)
494 (4 %)
468 (4 %)
460 (4 %)
455 (4 %)
15.5
15.8
16.2
15.9
16.4
thererof: women
thereof: men
Apprentices (including Cooperative State University
(Duale Hochschule) students)
Age
Average age (in years)
Age breakdown
> 60 years
< 25 years
Other
Avg. length of service (in years)
All figures on the age and length of service of employees refer to the LBBW Group excluding the subgroup
(i. e. they do not include LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH and MKB Mittelrheinische Bank GmbH).
78
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Personnel Figures for LBBW (Bank) (as at 31 Dec. of each year)
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Employees
Total employees
thererof: women
thereof: men
10,472
9,877
9,585
9,124
9,292
5,340 (51 %)
5,066 (51 %)
4,945 (52 %)
4,808 (53 %)
4,864 (52 %)
5,132 (49 %)
4,811 (49 %)
4,640 (48 %)
4,316 (47 %)
4,428 (48 %)
Full-time employees
8,144 (78 %)
7,590 (77 %)
7,285 (76 %)
6,814 (75 %)
6,909 (74 %)
Part-time employees
2,328 (22 %)
2,287 (23 %)
2,300 (24 %)
2,310 (25 %)
2,383 (26 %)
2,121 (91 %)
2,083 (91 %)
2,125 (92 %)
2,137 (93 %)
2,205 (93 %)
207 (9 %)
204 (9 %)
175 (8 %)
173 (7 %)
178 (7 %)
Employees with disabilities/employees with equivalent
status (reporting date)
412 (3.9 %)
399 (4.1 %)
444 (4.5 %)
(4.6 % 1)
434 (4.7 %)
Apprentices (including Cooperative State University
(Duale Hochschule) students)
547 (5.2 %)
506 (5.1 %)
480 (5 %)
458 (5 %)
442 (4.8 %)
74
95
126
171
201
thererof: women
thereof: men
Trainees
427
No. of fixed-term employees
45
36
36
14
8
No. of temporary employees
36
34
22
22
25
7 (0.1 %)
5 (0.1 %)
6 (0.1 %)
6 (0.1 %)
7 (0.1 %)
0 (0 %)
0 (0 %)
0 (0 %)
0 (0 %)
0 (0 %)
Management
Board of Managing Directors
thereof: women
Division heads (including brand board members)
49 (0.5 %)
48 (0.5 %)
47 (0.5 %)
46 (0.5 %)
49 (0.5 %)
thereof: women
2 (4 %)
2 (4 %)
3 (6 %)
3 (7 %)
4 (8 %)
Department heads
231 (2 %)
229 (2 %)
212 (2 %)
203 (2 %)
205 (2 %)
thereof: women
14 (6 %)
19 (8 %)
15 (7 %)
17 (8 %)
22 (11 %)
910 (9 %)
845 (9 %)
669 (7 %)
639 (7 %)
637 (7 %)
179 (20 %)
173 (20 %)
132 (20 %)
125 (20 %)
121 (19 %)
42.4
43.1
42.5
42.5
42.8
105 (1 %)
119 (1 %)
122 (1 %)
114 (1 %)
143 (2 %)
51 – 60 years
2,189 (21 %)
2,171 (22 %)
2,116 (22 %)
1,993 (21 %)
2,193 (24 %)
41 – 50 years
3,646 (35 %)
3,574 (36 %)
3,528 (37 %)
3,383 (36 %)
3,346 (36 %)
31 – 40 years
2,856 (27 %)
2,561 (26 %)
2,413 (25 %)
2,276 (25 %)
2,212 (24 %)
25 – 30 years
1,138 (11 %)
992 (10 %)
967 (10 %)
928 (10 %)
969 (10 %)
538 (5 %)
460 (5 %)
439 (5 %)
430 (5 %)
429 (5 %)
Group heads
thereof: women
Age
Average age (in years)
Age breakdown
> 60 years
< 25 years
1
Quota from 2013 onward calculated according to the process stipulated for the Schwerbehindertenabgabe (compensation paid for non/under-employment of
the severely disabled). The figure is therefore not comparable with prior-year figures. The same is true for the KPIs on p. 82 ff.
79
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Other
Part-time executive staff at levels 1 to 3
3
5
2
2
2
234
169
189
184
204
23
33
21
11
11
1,009
1,029
9692
846
768
139
194
163
154
141
No. of men on family year leave
N/A
N/A
1
1
2
No. of women on family year leave
N/A
N/A
106
107
95
No. of men on parental leave/family year
thereof: no. of men working during parental leave
No. of women on parental leave/family year
thereof: no. of women working during
parental leave
No. of men on family care leave
N/A
N/A
10
10
10
No. of women on family care leave
N/A
N/A
13
18
28
Avg. length of service (in years)
15.9
16.4
16.7
16.6
16.9
Turnover rate, including early retirement and
severance agreements
6.5 %
8.4 %
6.2 %
4.0 % 3
3.4 %
302
394
320
1973
139
155
3.1 %
No. of women who have left the company
No. of men who have left the company
Rate of absence due to illness
N/A = no data available
2 Data collected incorrectly. The figure was subsequently corrected.
3 Adjusted for the transfer of operations.
80
365
422
321
2353
3.6 %
3.3 %
3.2 %
3.4 %
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Remuneration Structure1
AT
29 %
31 %
33 %
35 %
36 %
TG 7-9
43 %
42 %
41 %
40 %
40 %
Up to TG 6
28 %
27 %
26 %
25 %
24 %
Remuneration Structure by Gender1
AT
Women
Men
5%
24 %
TG 7-9
23 %
Up to TG 6
23 %
Women
Men
Women
Men
6%
25 %
7%
26 %
20 %
23 %
19 %
23 %
5%
22 %
5%
21 %
Women
Men
8%
27 %
18 %
24 %
5%
21 %
Women
Men
8%
28 %
16 %
24 %
16 %
4%
20 %
4%
Personnel Development
Personnel development
measures, total
14,241
11,748
12,870
13,814
13,979
Personnel development
measures, women (no.)
6,659
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Personnel development
measures, men (no.)
7,582
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Seminar days per
employee (not including
apprentices)
3.4
3.2
3.1
3.3
3.0
Seminar hours per
employee (not including
apprentices; 7.8 hrs./day)
26.8
25.0
24.1
25.7
23.4
9,062
7,344
6,118
5,703
4,885
Management seminars
652
798
629
1,281
1,027
Long-term seminars
642
509
492
537
599
Personnel development measures by topic (no.)
Specialist banking
seminars
Office skills training
1
154
56
13
11
15
Methodological
expertise
1,402
1,155
1,695
1,888
2,121
Language seminars
1,454
1,072
768
817
870
IT seminars
375
272
506
251
536
586
420
588
PC user seminars
500
542
Sales seminars
N/A
N/A
730
1,070
1,207
Other specialist
seminars
N/A
N/A
1,333
1,836
2,131
Employees in the TVöD (3.9 %) category were assigned to the relevant bank-specific wage group.
AT = Außertariflich = Certain employees with special qualifications are not subject to collective bargaining agreements and are therefore
compensated by way of a separate agreement that exceeds the highest wage group.
TVöD = Tarifvertrag für den öffentlichen Dienst = Collective Agreement for the Public Service Sector
TG = Tarifgruppe (Banktarif) = Bank-specific wage group
81
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Key Performance Indicators – Human Resources.
The best foundation for business success is a sustainable human resources policy. To measure the implementation of the Guidelines for Sustainability in
Human Resources Policy, we regularly document key
performance indicators (KPIs).
Over the past few years, we have been able to make
the work-life balances of our staff more flexible. Thus,
compared with 2007 we have more than doubled the
number of spots in child care facilities from 30 to 82.
Today, one out of four employees make use of the
option of working on a part-time basis. By comparison,
only one out of five did so in 2007. In the same period
of time, the percentage of women in executive positions has risen from 14.7 % to 16.4 %.
Key Performance Indicators – Human Resources (LBBW Bank)
Before EU
restructuring
Key Performance Indicator
is an indicator of the
extent to which …
During EU restructuring
After EU
restructuring
2007
2012
2013
2014
–
–
–
–
1. Compensation & Benefits
No suitable indicator
currently available
–
2. Change Management
Percentage of employeeinitiated resignations
... employees are satisfied
with the work organization
and working conditions.
N/A
1.7 %
1.5 %
1.3 %
Percentage of measures by
management consulting
((no. of events (team workshops) no. of employees) x 100)
... change processes in the
company are furthered by
the employer.
2.5 %
3%
1.9 %
3%
3. Work-Life Balance
82
»berufundfamilie« audit
certification by the Hertie
Foundation every three years
… independent institutions
rank our company as family
friendly.
Starting in
2010
_
Re-audit
_
Daycare spots
… we make it easier for our
employees who are parents
to work.
30 (including
5 drop-in
spots)
68 (including
5 drop-in
spots)
68 (including
5 drop-in
spots)
82 (including
5 drop-in
spots)
Part-time percentage
… our employees take
advantage of flexible working
time models to balance their
careers and personal lives.
20 %
24 %
25 %
26 %
Number of part-time
executive staff at levels 1 to 4/
percentage of part-time
executive staff at levels 1 to 4
… our employees take
advantage of flexible working
time models to balance their
careers and personal lives.
N/A
23 (2.5 %)
21 (2.3 %)
28 (3.1 %)
Number of female part-time
executive
staff at levels 1 to 4/
Percentage of female part-time
executive staff at levels 1 to 4
… our employees take
advantage of flexible working
time models to balance their
careers and personal lives.
N/A
15 (10 %)
13 (9 %)
17 (11.6 %)
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Before EU
restructuring
Key Performance Indicator
is an indicator of the
extent to which …
2007
During EU restructuring
2012
2013
After EU
restructuring
2014
4. Communication and Information
Percentage of employees who
can access the company
intranet
… the employer informs
employees about important
events.
_
98.5 %
98.5 %
98.5 %
Information disseminated
about the results of the
employee survey (in 2007
results of the survey of part
of the workforce by Great
Place to Work)
… employees feel sufficiently
informed.
59 %
_
93 %
_
Participation rate in
management seminars/
workshops
… executives discuss their
management duties and
further develop their
leadership skills.
45 %
67 %
70 %
87 %
Employee review percentage
… employee reviews were
conducted with employees
every three years (percentage).
90 %
96 %
92 %
Not calculated
due to change of
system in 2014
Personnel development
measures per employee (no.
of personnel development
measures/no. of employees)
… we develop our employees’
skills.
1.9
1.3
1.5
1.5
Seminar days per employee
(total no. of seminar days/
no. of employees)
… we develop our employees’
skills.
4.4
3.1
3.3
3.0
0%
1%
2%
4%
Not
recorded
Not
recorded
5. Leadership
6. Personnel Development
7. Human Resources Planning and Selection
Early turnover rate ((employment relationships terminated
in probationary period/no. of
hires) x 100)
… we make good personnel
selections.
Early turnover rate
By age structure
(age cluster in %)1
... young employees remain in
the company.
> 60 yrs/43.6 %
> 60 yrs/26.7 %
51 – 60 yrs/7.3 %
51 – 60 yrs/4.0 %
41 – 50 yrs/1.6 %
41 – 50 yrs/1.6 %
31 – 40 yrs/1.8 %
31 – 40 yrs/2.2 %
25 – 30 yrs/5.7 %
25 – 30 yrs/3.9 %
< 25 yrs/12.5 %
< 25 yrs/9.6 %
8. Employee Retention
1
Avg. length of service
(in years)
… we are able to retain our
employees for the long term.
14.7
16.7
16.6
16.9
Employee satisfaction rate
(from the employee survey
or in 2007 from the partial
survey by Great Place to Work)
… employees are satisfied with
their employer.
74 %
_
93 %
_
Adjusted for the transfer of operations in 2013.
83
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Before EU
restructuring
Key Performance
Indicator
9.
is an indicator of the
extent to which …
During EU restructuring
After EU
restructuring
2007
2012
2013
2014
39.1
42.5
42.5
42.8
Demographic Developments
Average age of the
workforce (in years)
… we ensure a balanced
ratio of older and younger
employees.
Age breakdown
(age clusters in %)
… we ensure a balanced
ratio of older and younger
employees.
> 60 yrs/0 %
> 60 yrs/1 %
> 60 yrs/1 %
> 60 yrs/1 %
51 – 60 yrs/18 %
51 – 60 yrs/22 %
51 – 60 yrs/22 %
51 – 60 yrs/24 %
41 – 50 yrs/32 %
41 – 50 yrs/37 %
41 – 50 yrs/37 %
41 – 50 yrs/36 %
31 – 40 yrs/31 %
31 – 40 yrs/25 %
31 – 40 yrs/25 %
31 – 40 yrs/24 %
25 – 30 yrs/13 %
25 – 30 yrs/10 %
25 – 30 yrs/10 %
25 – 30 yrs/10 %
< 25 yrs/6 %
< 25 yrs/5 %
< 25 yrs/5 %
< 25 yrs/5 %
Training rate (number of
apprentices and Coop.
State Univ. students/no. of
employees) x 100)
... we train young
professionals internally.
4.5 %
3.6 %
3.6 %
3.4 %
Rate of Cooperative
State University [Duale
Hochschule] students
((no. of Coop. State Univ.
students/no. of employees)
x 100)
... we train young
professionals internally.
1.7 %
1.4 %
1.4 %
1.4 %
Trainee ratio ([no. of
trainees/no. of employees]
x 100)
... we train young
professionals internally.
1.7 %
1.3 %
1.9 %
2.2 %
Apprentice hiring ratio
([no. of apprentices hired/
no. of apprentices total]
x 100)
... we offer young
professionals long-term
career prospects.
92.3 %
90.1 %
83.5 %
81.1 %
2.8 %
3.2 %
3.4 %
3.1 %
_
»Excellence«
status since
2012
»Excellence«
status since
2012
»Excellence«
status since
2012
22.3 %
30.8 %
34.0 %
35.0 %
10. Promoting Health
84
Rate of absence due to
illness (with physician’s
note)
((total absences due to
illness in days/target
working time in days)
x 100)
… our employees are
absent due to illness.
Degree of success in the
Corporate Health Award
(in %)
… our company health
management efforts meet
high standards and how
they rank in a comparison
of companies across
Germany.
Use of sports and leisure
facilities
… we promote employee
health.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Before EU
restructuring
Key Performance Indicator
is an indicator of the
extent to which …
2007
During EU restructuring
2012
2013
After EU
restructuring
2014
11. Human Resources Management
Currently no appropriate
indicator
_
_
_
_
_
12. Equal Opportunity and Diversity
Percentage of female
employees
… we provide equal
opportunities regardless
of gender.
52 %
52 %
53 %
52 %
Percentage of women in
leadership positions
(Level 1 to 4)
… we provide equal
opportunities regardless
of gender.
14.7 %
16.9 %
16.2 %
16.4 %
Percentage of workforce of
non-German nationality
… we provide equal
opportunities regardless
of national origin.
6.5 %
5.6 %
5.5 %
5.5 %
Percentage of disabled
employees or employees
with equivalent status in
the workforce
… we employ people with
physical and mental
impairments in our company.
3.8 %
4.5 %
4.6 %
4.7 %
85
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
Health.
We make targeted investments in the health – and
therefore the productivity – of our employees. In this
connection, we attach importance to creating healthy
working conditions. At the same time, we support our
employees with a large range of offerings aimed at
helping them to make healthy working and life style
choices.
In a full-day group course, we offer smokers medical
advice and assistance in their attempts to overcome
the habit. In this connection, pilot courses were held
in Stuttgart in June 2015 in which participants were
able to specifically plan their schedule for giving up
smoking and develop alternative measures to prevent
any setbacks.
All health-related activities at LBBW are coordinated
by the Health Management Steering Committee. The
Health Round Table with representatives from various
units and employee representatives serves in an advisory and information capacity.
We offer numerous health courses as well as workplace-related movement and relaxation offerings, e. g.
»Bewegte und entspannte Mittagspause« (Exercise and
Relaxation during Lunch) at all major LBBW offices.
Employees who work more than 30 kilometers away
from Stuttgart, Mannheim, Karlsruhe or Mainz can
obtain information on the Intranet about prevention
courses offered by the statutory health funds. We support these individual health activities with a financial
grant in cases in which the health funds do not cover
all of the costs.
Our in-company health management takes account of
all main health-related factors arising from working
life. Headed by a health manager, it pursues a multidisciplinary approach.
In creating a healthy working environment, we do
not only focus on physical factors such as furniture,
IT hardware and software, climate and many other
aspects as well but also encourage a health-promoting
management style backed up by numerous offerings
aimed at helping our employees to improve their worklife balance.
We want to raise our employees’ awareness of the
fact that a healthy life style reduces many risk factors,
thus preventing illnesses. After the successful launch
in Heilbronn in 2014, we organized a regional action
day in Ravensburg in 2015, presenting in a practical
manner health-related measures such as back exercises,
stress management and nutrition as well as matters
related to workplace structuring and team work. This
will be followed up by further health days at other
locations.
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We work with fitness studios all over Germany. LBBW’s
sports and recreation club is currently used by more
than 3,000 members, who enjoy numerous indoor and
outdoor sporting options.
Our efforts toward creating a healthy company are
being rewarded: In a nationwide comparison of companies conducted by EuPD Research as part of the
Corporate Health Awards, LBBW’s Company Health
Management activities achieved the coveted »excellence« status again in November 2014.
Occupational Health Service
The Occupational Health Service supports and advises
our employees in many health-related matters. During
office hours, employees can discuss health problems
in strict confidence. The advisory services we offer
cover occupational health and sociomedical issues
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
such as returning to work after physical and/or mental
illness and also include preventive measures. We support our employees in developing their own individual
health strategies. Based on discussions and various
tests, personalized recommendations are developed
including factors such as exercise, nutrition, stress
management, smoking and job satisfaction, and
strategies for their implementation discussed.
The services of physicians at LBBW’s locations in Stuttgart, Karlsruhe, Mannheim and Mainz as well as of
occupational nurses in Stuttgart are available to every
employee. In 2014, these personnel provided counseling
or treatment in around 10,000 cases.
Social Services Department
The Social Services Department advises employees
and executives at the sites in Stuttgart, Karlsruhe,
Mannheim, Mainz and Leipzig as well as branch employees on stress and difficult job situations, mental
health, addictions and personal issues (such as the
death of a close family member). Preventive advising
on resilience and healthcare is also offered. After
an acute crisis situation such as a bank robbery or
accident, the Social Services Department offers immediate emergency psychological care.
In individual consultations, the focus is frequently
on dealing with rising professional demands and
change processes. In 2014, 44 % of the consultations
concerned job-related matters, 35 % mental health
concerns and 20 % personal issues.
In addition, workshops, courses and lectures on
psycho-social issues, such as mental health, burnout
prevention or dealing with difficult situations with
customers, are being offered. The »Mental Health:
Dealing with strain and stress« workshop met with a
very favorable response on the part of employees in
2014. In this course, participants work through their
daily family and job-related strain and learn to avoid
or cope with stress, mentally or operationally. The
workshop also offers theoretical and practical selfmanagement tips.
The Social Services Department also advises managers
on classic leadership issues as well as preventive and
specific measures to respond to any conspicuous psychological behavior and addictive disorders afflicting
employees. Launched in 2012, the »Strengthening Mental Health« initiative for all executives in levels 2,
3 and 4 was continued. The introductory seminar is
now a firm part of executive training, while a voluntary
more in-depth seminar has been added to the syllabus.
In 2014, the Social Services Department held consultations with 676 employees and executives. The number
of consultations rose to 2,567 (2013: 2,454).
Occupational Safety
Health and occupational safety at LBBW is governed
by a number of statutory regulations. However, we do
much more than the minimum required by law in order
to offer our employees a safe, pleasant and productive
work environment.
For instance, occupational safety experts and occupational physicians are involved in the early stages in
workplace-related decisions, such as the purchasing
of furniture and IT equipment, new construction and
renovations and the development of building standards.
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Workplace walk-throughs allow for in-person viewing
of conditions on site and, if necessary, investigation
of possible improvements. Numerous safety-related
on-site inspections and individual consulting sessions
on workplace ergonomics were carried out in 2014
on a scheduled or ad-hoc basis. In addition, regular
training was provided for occupational safety agents
(e. g. executives, employee representatives and safety
officers).
In its function as an advisory and coordination body,
our occupational safety committee, which meets quarterly and represents LBBW’s entire workforce, deals
with all key occupational health and safety issues.
Preventive fire safety measures at LBBW were again
further expanded in 2014. In this connection, the
focus was on reinforcing the internal control process,
adjustments to the evacuation plan and related drills
as well as various measures relating to technical fire
protection, e. g. function testing of the electro-acoustic
systems. In addition, extensive training courses for
fire safety assistants were conducted and fire safety
rules amended.
The number of reportable workplace accidents in 2014
came to seven (previous year: five). Accordingly, the
rate of reportable workplace accidents per 1,000 employees stood at 0.8, well under the industry average.
A total of 29 reportable accidents sustained by employees on the way to or from work were registered
(previous year: 32).
Company Cafeterias
The six company cafeterias operated by our subsidiary
LBBW GastroEvent GmbH offer our employees varied
and healthy nutritional choices:
■ On 1 September 2014, the three largest company
cafeterias in Stuttgart were awarded the »Job & Fit«
logo by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung e. V.
(DGE). Among other things, this institution audited
the quality of the food, menu planning and preparation. The requirements of the DGE quality standard for
in-company catering were found to have been met.
■
■
■
No work-related illness was reported to us in 2014.
■
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All company cafeterias offer one vegetarian meal
daily. In addition, the menu of the Stuttgart company
cafeterias include two vegetarian dishes once a
week as well as at least two different types of
vegetable side dishes each day.
The two company cafeterias in the Am Hauptbahnhof and Am Pariser Platz locations in Stuttgart are
certified in line with the EU regulation on organic
foods and labeling.
LBBW GastroEvent GmbH purchases the bulk of
fresh produce from regional suppliers. This supports local producers and also means short transportation routes, thus easing the strain on the
environment. We also plan our menus to incorporate
seasonal fruit and vegetables. The food purchased or
produced in the region is designated on the menu as
»From the region«.
The meat used in our company cafeterias is from
selected butcher shops in the local area with which
we maintain personal relationships. When purchasing
fish, we take care to support sustainable fisheries.
Both of our fish suppliers indicate the origin of the
fish in every shipment.
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■
■
■
■
In accordance with the EU Regulation on the Provision of Food Information to Consumers, the menu
has displayed allergen information since 1 December 2014.
Food is prepared in batches. Some dishes are prepared to order at the à la minute stations available
at four of our six cafeterias to ensure maximum
quality and freshness.
All LBBW GastroEvent establishments, cafeterias and
the kitchenettes operated by LBBW GastroEvent GmbH
in the headquarters buildings have been serving
solely fair trade and organically grown coffee/
espresso since 2009.
Organic waste from all of the sites is transported to
biogas facilities and recycled to produce energy.
Personnel Development.
We pursue a sustainable personnel development policy
as the ability to recruit and retain skilled and committed employees is a decisive determinant for business
competitiveness. We actively support our employees in
their efforts to develop their skills and abilities
throughout their entire careers.
Using LBBW’s »Employee Self-Service«, employees are
also able to signal any interest in a change of position
and define their career goals and personal mobility
preferences. They are then approached if any vacancies arise.
Recruiting
We contact high school graduates and young professionals early on through focused apprentice and trainee
marketing (e. g. at trade fairs and through information
events and internships for college or high school students). Alongside conventional recruiting methods, we
also use social media to contact potential applicants.
Our employer information is available on all devices –
from PCs to smartphones to tablets.
■ Career information day: We organized a career information day for the first time in 2014. Almost 300
school students utilized this opportunity to find out
more about training options and the application
procedure at the LBBW training center.
■ Facebook: Our apprentices report on Facebook
about the ins and outs of their apprenticeships at
BW-Bank or the dual-education program at LBBW.
The »BW-Bank Ausbildung« page on Facebook
currently has just under 5,000 followers.
■ Xing: We use the career network to communicate
with students and college graduates as well as
specialists and executives.
■ YouTube: The online video channels set up by
LBBW and BW-Bank provide information to interested
parties who want to know about our apprenticeships
and trainee programs.
■ LBBW career portal: Our e-recruiting platform
features an online job board and information for
students in schools and universities, graduates, and
specialists and executives about working at LBBW
(www.LBBW.de/de/beruf_und_karriere (in German
only)).
We offer all our employees a broad range of seminars.
This is because we are convinced that training and
continuing education are crucial for career advancement. In 2014, the number of participants in internal
and external seminars rose slightly over the previous
year to 13,979 (2013: 13,814).
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Training
LBBW takes its responsibility for training young people
seriously: At the end of 2014, 462 young people were
being trained in the LBBW Group (previous year: 479).
The training rate was 4.2 % (LBBW (Bank): 4.8 %) Each
year, LBBW provides at least 160 training positions
and 45 places for students in the bank management
and business information systems programs at BadenWuerttemberg Cooperative State University (Duale
Hochschule).
Sustainability is an integral part of any training at
LBBW. As early as their orientation week, new apprentices are introduced to our Corporate Sustainability
and Health department. Future banking specialists,
financial assistants and Baden-Württemberg Cooperative State University students are familiarized with
products such as sustainable investment vehicles in
professional seminars.
In April 2014, we held our first sustainability seminar
in cooperation with the Academy for Nature Preservation and Environmental Protection in Baden-Württemberg. Twenty-three apprentices participated in this
event. In addition to a comprehensive introduction to
the subject, the apprentices learned about the role of
financial institutions in sustainable development. The
sustainability activities of the LBBW Group were on the
training plan at the seminar, as were LBBW’s sustainable retail investment funds.
Since 2009, social and ecological criteria have also
been taken into account when assessing investment
strategies in the Savings Bank Association’s »Stock
Exchange Simulation Game«, in which all LBBW Bank
apprentices take part in their second year of training.
In 2014, a team of LBBW apprentices won the state
Baden-Württemberg competition in the sustainability
category, reaching sixth place at the national level.
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In cooperation with »mehrwert« (a social service agency), our apprentices can work in a social service facility
for a week and thereby learn first-hand about the daily
life of people who are elderly, disabled or ill. Alternatively, in 2011 we began to offer them the option of
working on an environmental project. Along with organized introductory and follow-up sessions, this time
is a valuable, personally enriching experience for many
of our trainees. In 2014, 31 apprentices (previous year:
43) made use of the opportunity to broaden their
social horizons in this way.
Training the younger generation is an important success factor for LBBW’s future. For this reason, we offer
first-rate trainee programs to actively foster talented
young people and develop their professional and personal skills. The LBBW Group hired 204 trainees in
2014.
Skill and Executive Development
LBBW’s »Management Competence Model« defines
what we require from our future leaders and which
skills we expect them to have. This model helps to
identify and development young potential, while
allowing established executives to assess their own
strengths and areas of development.
LBBW uses systematic talent management activities to
help fill vacant management positions, allowing us to
ensure that the positions of importance for LBBW’s
long-term business success are permanently filled with
the right individuals. Talented employees take part in
various potential development programs. These do
not only focus on professional expertise and management qualities but also on soft skills.
We have substantially revised the basic leadership
training for new managers. Now extending over a
period of 18 days, the seminar program comprises the
following elements: »Assuming Leadership«, »Leading
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
with Personality«, »Conducting Conversations«,
»Culture through Leadership«, »Healthy Leadership«,
»Leading in a Team« and »Leading through Change«.
The fixed group of participants encourages networking and is conducive to productive learning in a
climate of mutual trust.
A total of 277 workshops were held in 2014 to ensure
successful implementation of the change processes
at LBBW. They were attended by managers and their
teams, a total of 3,638 employees. The subjects
addressed included general challenges arising from
change management processes as well as specific requirements arising from day-to-day activities identified
in the 2013 employee survey.
Further, numerous executives took advantage of LBBW’s
management consulting staff’s coaching offers to receive individual consulting and support in leadership
and character issues.
As part of our executive development efforts, we developed and successfully implemented the »Feedback
to Executives« process in 2014. This process gives
executives feedback from up to four perspectives on
the how working with the executive is subjectively perceived – by employees, colleagues, service providers
and service recipients. These results can be used as a
basis for defining measures for improving the relationship and for optimizing personnel and organizational
development. The process is regularly implemented to
the satisfaction of all those involved.
We define leadership as being based on an open culture of communication and sustainable activity. It is
firmly enshrined in guidelines. A sense of responsibility, initiative, the willingness to take the lead and
loyalty are the key elements of our definition of leadership. Relations with employees are characterized
by trust, appreciation and reliability. Our executives
encourage independence in thought, in action and
decision-making as well as the personal and professional development of each individual.
Older Employees
Life-long learning forms part of our corporate culture.
This applies to all our employees regardless of their
age. Our range of training courses is based on job
requirements. In this respect, the same internal and
external conditions apply to all age groups. Our seminars are characterized by a mixed age structure. In
this way, younger participants have an opportunity of
learning from the experience of their older colleagues,
while the older ones benefit from the fresh input and
skills of the younger ones. Consequently, we are able
to overcome preconceptions, strengthen team work
and preserve productivity through life-long learning.
We have gained good experience with this form of
lived integration. At the same time, we are addressing
the challenges arising from demographic change as
the workforce potential will continue to decline and
age over the coming years. The number of people
aged between 20 and 59 years will drop by 7.9 million
by 2030, while the number of those aged between 60
and 64 years will increase by 1.6 million in the same
period according to the German federal government’s
report on demographic trends.
With our continuing education program, our in-company
health management and the services provided by the
in-company medical service and the Social Services
Department, we offer older employees a comprehensive range of services helping them to preserve their
ability to broaden their knowledge and to actively take
part in working life with a sense of joy.
Employees who plan to reduce their working hours
shortly before retirement or who enter early or full
retirement receive support from the Bank in their
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
transition to this new phase in their lives. Thus, we
encourage them to participate in the four-day seminar
entitled »Retirement – What Now?«. This seminar
explores the process of taking leave and highlights
future opportunities for relationships, leisure activities
and social involvement.
Equal Opportunity and Diversity.
Companies that want to benefit from the knowledge
and skills of their employees must create a working
environment free of prejudices. All employees should
be valued regardless of their sex, nationality, ethnic
origin, religion or views, disability, age, sexual orientation or identity.
By aligning LBBW with the »Diversity as Opportunity –
German Corporate Diversity Charter« initiative
(www. charta-der-vielfalt.de) (only available in German),
we are committed to creating a workplace free of
prejudice for all employees.
In 2009, a diversity officer was assigned to supervise
and support diversity and equal opportunity efforts at
LBBW. A corresponding »Works Agreement on Protection from Discrimination and a Cooperative Environment in the Workplace« had already been adopted by
LBBW in late 2007. Simultaneously, an e-learning tool
was introduced to implement the Allgemeines Gleichbehandlungsgesetz (AGG – General Anti-Discrimination
Act) that is mandatory for all employees.
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Cultural Diversity
As a financial institution working across industries
and cultures, LBBW benefits from the diverse interests,
biographies, skills and cultural orientation of its workforce. Currently, people from 61 countries across the
globe work in the LBBW Group. Employees of non-German nationality make up 6.0 % of the total workforce.
At LBBW Bank, this figure is 5.5 %. This diversity is
extremely valuable for the company and helps us to
establish and maintain contacts throughout the world.
Women and Men
LBBW provides all employees with equivalent qualifications, whether male or female, with the same training
and promotion opportunities. We want to continually
improve career opportunities for women and increase
their numbers in specialist and executive staff positions. At the end of 2014, women accounted for 52 %
of the total staff at the LBBW Group as well as LBBW
(Bank). The proportion of women in the top four management levels of LBBW (Bank) came to 16.4 % (2013:
16.2 %). Our goal is to steadily increase this number:
In 2014, there were 17 new appointments at the department head level; of these, five were women,
equivalent to 29 %. At the division head level there
were five new appointments, including one woman.
This is equal to 20 %.
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Managers at LBBW (Bank), (as at 31 Dec. of each year)
Managers by gender
Men
Women
Level 1: Members of the Board of Managing Directors
7 (100 %)
0 (0 %)
Level 2: Brand board members + heads of division
45 (92 %)
4 (8 %)
183 (89 %)
22 (11 %)
Level 3: Department heads
Level 4: Heads of group
Total level 1 – 4
516 (81 %)
121 (19 %)
751 (83.6 %)
147 (16.4 %)
Managers level 1 – 3
Share of women in level 1 – 3
26 (10 %)
Remuneration Structure by Gender, LBBW (Bank)*
31 Dec. 2014
28 %
AT
8%
16 %
TG 7 –9
24 %
Up to TG 6
4%
30 %
Men
20 %
25 %
20 %
15 %
10 %
5%
0%
5%
10 %
15 %
20 %
25 %
Women
* Employees in the TVöD (2014: 3.9 %) category were assigned to the relevant bank-specific wage group.
AT = Außertariflich = Certain employees with special qualifications are not subject to collective bargaining agreements and are therefore
compensated by way of a separate agreement that exceeds the highest wage group.
TVöD = Tarifvertrag für den öffentlichen Dienst = Collective Agreement for the Public Service Sector
TG = Tarifgruppe (Banktarif) = Bank-specific wage group
A comparison of the breakdown of remuneration by
gender reveals differences. With respect to the individual levels and functions, it can be seen that the
differences in remuneration decline the further up the
hierarchy you go. Whereas female employees in the
specialist functions still earn an average of 10 % less
than their male colleagues, this figure contracts with
each higher hierarchical level. At the department head
level, the difference is around 8 %. In the case of division heads and Board members of BW-Bank, LBBW
Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen Bank there is
on average no difference in the salaries paid to men
and women.
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Looking ahead over the next few years, we want to
continue improving career opportunities for women. To
this end, we have adopted an extensive plan of action
and launched a mentoring program that actively involves executive staff. The program commenced in 2013
with the »Mut zum Erfolg!« (Courage to Succeed) seminar for women who wish to attain management positions. It is particularly directed at women who wish to
re-enter their careers after completing the family phase. The seminar seeks to analyze the participants’ personal attitudes towards their careers and skills as a
basis for planning their own professional development
strategy. In response to the strong interest, the seminar was held again in 2014. All four dates were fully
booked.
The mentoring program is meeting with a favorable
response. Due to the many qualified applicants, the pilot project began with two groups instead of one in
2014. A personal mentor is available to provide
guidance and resources to each of the 21 mentees for
a year. Two external advisors are also available during
this period. The final meeting was held in October
2015 to present the results of the mentoring processes
and was attended by the Board of Managing Directors
and all division heads.
Equal opportunities for both genders and an improved
balance between family and career have been the core
objectives of LBBW’s women’s network since 2007.
Hans-Jörg Vetter, Chairman of the Board of Managing
Directors of LBBW, is the honorary patron of the initiative. Around 240 female employees currently participate actively in this initiative. Thus, for example, the
women’s network launched a job-sharing exchange
which has now been integrated in the Human Resources department’s recruitment activities.
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People with Disabilities
As at 31 December 2014, LBBW (Bank) had 434 employees who were severely disabled or held the equivalent
status. This translates to a ratio of 4.7 % of the total
workforce (previous year: 4.6 %). This is currently minimally below the statutory quota of 5 % of the total
workforce. For this reason, we pay a compensatory
contribution.
In order to increase the quota of employees with disabilities employed at LBBW, we report
all external job openings to the Bundesagentur für Arbeit (Federal Empoyment Agency). We have set up a
technical interface with the Agency for this purpose in
the recruiting process. In our recruiting process, preference is given to job applicants with a disability provided that their qualifications are equivalent. The LBBW
Representative Body for the Severely Disabled is integrated into all processes.
LBBW employees who hold severely disabled status are
advised and represented by the General Representative Body for the Severely Disabled (GSBV – Gesamtschwerbehindertenvertretung) and five regional representative bodies for the severely disabled. GSBV
attended over 500 meetings within the Group in 2014
at which it provided personal advice and support on
workplace design and held consultations with LBBW as
the employer, the employee representative council and
the Group employee representative council.
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LBBW Improvement Process.
Creativity, the ability to innovate and the continuous
improvement of processes, products and services are
decisive determinants of business success.
For this reason, we encourage our employees to actively
contribute their ideas and suggestions so that they
can successfully help to shape LBBW’s future with their
knowledge and experience.
The LBBW improvement process is an established
leadership and motivation instrument that enjoys
great acceptance on the part of employees: 3,921
suggestions were submitted in 2014 (previous year:
3,789), while the value of the benefits derived from the
system doubled to EUR 18 million (previous year: 9.1).
More than 5 % of the suggestions were directly related
to sustainability and generated benefits of around EUR
55,000. However, including the numerous suggestions
which primarily addressed other aspects but were also
relevant for sustainability, the actual benefits were far
greater.
through our »Kapitalkonten« pension plan model that
LBBW employees can use to plan for retirement. This
plan is composed of a base account which we finance
and to which employees can add a separate and voluntary deferred salary component so that it is converted
into an employee-financed capital accumulation account.
In 2014, LBBW’s company retirement planning investments and expenses amounted to approximately
EUR 131 million (2013: EUR 135 million).
Career and Personal Life.
Work takes up half of our lives, as they say, and our
responsibility is to bring the one half into balance as
much as possible with the other half. For employees in
the life phase of caring for children, this has gone without saying at LBBW for a long time now. Support for employees who are caring for older relatives or disabled
family members is becoming increasingly important.
Company Retirement Planning.
Care of Family Members
In the wake of demographic change, the relevance
of achieving a balance between work and caring for
family members will become even more apparent over
the coming years. With this in mind, we widened our
range of information services and seminars in 2014.
The »Care required, what now?« seminar, in particular,
met with high interest. It provided an overview of such
matters as nursing care insurance and the costs involved, relations with care services, legal precautions
and bodies offering advice. In addition, it provided a
forum for reaching out to other colleagues. More than
200 employees attended the seminar in 2014.
What business could better support its employees in
arranging financial planning for their golden years
than a bank? We are currently accomplishing this goal
Subject to prior consultation with their managers, employees who care for a family member can apply for
an additional six months’ leave over and above the
In 2014, LBBW was singled out for the third consecutive time by Deutsches Institut für Betriebswirtschaft
(German Institute of Business Management) as having
the best ideas management of any bank, insurance
company or financial services provider. It also ranked
first in the banks and insurance companies category in
the analysis conducted by Deutsches Institut for Ideenund Innovationsmanagement (German Institute of
Ideas and Innovation Management) in 2014.
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statutory entitlement of six months. Last year, 18 female and 10 male employees made use of this option.
Shorter periods of leave are also possible. Employees
who wish to care for a family member at home can
also reduce their working hours for a limited period
of up to 24 months, after which they have the option
resume their original working hours. We also provide
a further option in the form of remote working or
occasional working from home.
Moreover, LBBW is helping with the establishment of
emergency care for relatives needing support in
Mainz.
Childcare
Reliable and competent childcare is crucial for working
parents to ensure that professional and family life is
synchronized to everyone’s satisfaction. In 2014, we
expanded our childcare capacity and now offer a total
of 82 spots in what are mostly LBBW’s own childcare
facilities in Stuttgart, Mannheim, Karlsruhe and Mainz.
We also obtained 14 new creche spots at the Savings
Bank Academy. Special school vacation programs and,
since 2014, vacation minding for primary school children are also available.
As well as this, we offer parents emergency childcare
facilities in Stuttgart. To this end, we signed a contract
with the Parent and Child Center at Generationenhaus
West in 2014.
We offer all employees an advising and support program provided by a third-party service provider, pme
Familienservice. LBBW pays the cost of the consulting
and placement services, while the actual childcare
costs are paid by the parents.
In addition to the parental leave time guaranteed by law,
mothers and fathers who were employed by LBBW for at
least three years previously can take a leave of absence
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called a »family year«. During the leave, no salary is
paid. In 2014, 97 parents (95 women, 2 men) took advantage of this option (previous: 108).
To make it easier for our staff to return to work after
a leave of absence, we offer a variety of measures for
maintaining contact and pursuing continuing education during the parental leave or care period. For example, Human Resources operates an online portal
setting out current job vacancies and describing the
procedure for returning to work and also produces the
»Inside« staff magazine, thus ensuring that employees
are kept up to date.
In 2010, LBBW was recognized as a »family-oriented
company« for the first time on the basis of the
»berufundfamilie« audit. The certificate is valid for
three years. LBBW was successfully re-audited in 2013.
It prepared its first report, which was duly evaluated
by the auditor, in 2014. This confirms that LBBW has
created solid structures for ensuring an appropriate
work-life balance.
Flexible Management of Working Time
One element of family-oriented human resources policies entails the flexible management of working time.
LBBW offers its employees a working time framework
offering them substantial scope for looking after children or family members in need of care or simply for
having some time for themselves. The following models are possible:
Part-time models: These include individual, familyfriendly solutions, job-sharing and independent team
solutions. Flexible management of working time is
also possible within the scope of the statutory possibilities for full and part-time employees. For part-time
management positions, an employment level of at
least 70 % or a job-sharing model is required.
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Telecommuting: »mobile telecommuting« or a home
telecommuting workstation is possible for an employment level of at least 30 %. The costs for this are borne
by LBBW.
LBBW FlexiWertkonto – early retirement: The LBBW
FlexiWertkonto provides our employees with a model
with which they can finance early retirement prior to
the commencement of statutory pension benefits.
In this way, they receive their salary from the capital
which they have saved in this account. Employees
utilizing this option continued to be employed by
LBBW and continue to be covered by statutory pension
and health insurance as well as the in-company pension
scheme.
LBBW FlexiWertkonto – Sabbatical: Whether the
choice is time out for continuing education purposes,
or some time off to take care of a family member, with
the capital they have saved in the LBBW FlexiWertkonto,
employees can also finance a temporary leave of
absence.
Temporary leave of absence: In principle, our staff
have the option of taking a longer sabbatical.
Co-determination.
Baden-Württemberg’s Landespersonalvertretungsgesetz (State Employee Representation Act) as amended
11 December 2013 forms the foundation for co-determination at LBBW. The amendments to the law considerably expanded the co-determination and participation rights of employee representatives. In contrast,
LBBW’s subsidiaries are subject to the Betriebsverfassungsgesetz (Labor Management Relations Act). Due
to LBBW’s membership in various employer associations, the LBBW Group is bound by the relevant collective bargaining agreements based on the Tarifvertragsgesetz (Collective Bargaining Agreements Act).
As a member of the Verband öffentlicher Banken (VÖB –
Association of Public-Sector Banks), LBBW applies the
pay scale agreements for private and public-sector
banks. We are a guest member of the Kommunaler
Arbeitgeberverband Baden-Württemberg (KAV – BadenWürttemberg Municipal Employers Association).
Currently, 90.6 % of the LBBW Group’s employees are
represented by local Staff Councils, the General Staff
Council or Works Councils in various locations in
Germany. Executive staff (2.5 %) and LBBW Group employees working in the branches and offices abroad
(only applies to local employees; seconded employees
are represented by the employee representative council
(2013: 5.8 %/2014: 2.9 % – the sharp decline in employees reflects the sale of the Czech branch)), as well as
employees in smaller LBBW subsidiaries (4 %) are exempted from this rule. Staff meetings are held regularly at LBBW’s larger locations. Staff Councils and the
ver.di labor union employee group use LBBW’s Intranet
to disseminate current information and articles.
Remuneration System.
As a rule, when LBBW hires new employees, they are
assigned to a wage group based on the collective
bargaining agreements for the private-sector banking
industry and public-sector banks (bank-specific collective bargaining agreement). LBBW’s foreign branches
and subsidiaries follow the remuneration policy in
their specific countries, complying with local laws
and regulations in all cases.
LBBW has signed a voluntary commitment to comply
with the »Principles for Sound Compensation Practices«
issued by the FSB (Financial Stability Board). According
to these principles for financial market stabilization,
remuneration systems must be designed to support
sustainable corporate goals.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | EMPLOYEES
The Bundesanstalt für Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht
(BaFin – Federal Financial Supervisory Authority) defined the specifics of these standards for German law
and on this basis developed the Institutsvergütungsverordnung (Remuneration Ordinance for Institutions).
LBBW (Bank) prepared a remuneration report for 2014
in accordance with Section 16 of the Remuneration
Ordinance for Institutions as amended on 1 January
2014 and published this report at www.LBBW.de. In
accordance with this Regulation, the appropriateness
of the remuneration systems is reviewed annually.
Remuneration for LBBW employees comprises a fixed
salary and, if applicable, an additional variable component and benefits (social benefits such as company
pensions, flexible working time accounts and meal
subsidies). Individual bonuses are calculated based
on the employee’s function, agreemment on and
achievement of objectives, as well as performance
of duties, using quantitative and qualitative criteria.
The variable remuneration reflects LBBW’s sustained
economic success and the above-average contribution
made by the individual employee. It does not provide
any incentives to take disproportionately large risks.
There is no mathematical correlation between risktaking and the variable remuneration attainable.
The budget available for payment of bonuses depends
on the sustainable performance of the Bank and the
organizational units.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
Society.
Local, regional, actively involved.
We want to actively contribute to creating added social value for the
people in our regional core markets, generating positive impetus for
social adhesion and the development of our society. As a company
with regional roots, we consider this commitment to form an integral part of our sustainable corporate culture.
As a Landesbank we do not only engage in business
but also make an important contribution to society.
In our function as the clearing bank for the savings
banks, we ensure that the population at large, businesses and the public sector in the regions of BadenWürttemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saxony have
reasonable and sufficient access to financial services.
In particular, we support small and mid-size enterprises,
which form the backbone of the regional economy in
order to safeguard their competitiveness and to protect local employment.
In addition, BW-Bank operates as the local savings
bank in the territory of the state capital of Stuttgart.
A »current account for everyone« on a prepaid basis
can be opened by anyone, regardless of income or
any negative entries on record with the Schutzgemeinschaft für allgemeine Kreditsicherung (Schufa – Protec-
tive Association for Sales Financing and Credit Security).
In this way, we provide people in financial crises with
access to banking services.
Customers who wish to make a contribution to society
with their investments or assets receive support from
us in the form of the careful selection of and advice
on sustainable investment products, our crowdfunding
platform for social projects and our many years of
experience with foundations. Thus, for example, we
offer foundation officers impetus for »mission investing« (see p. 66 f.).
We also sponsor school education with a variety of
initiatives and support projects in the fields of art,
culture, sports, ecology and social concerns with our
donations, sponsorships and foundations.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
Good Ideas Come True.
©Thinkstock by Getty Images
A toy container for refugee children in Herrenberg for
EUR 5,000, two goals for the SV Oberjesingen junior
team for EUR 2,000, drums and stage equipment for
young bands at the Winnenden Town Music School for
EUR 2,500: there are many good ideas and the will to
change things. And with the support of many people
who have contributed just a few euros, it has been
possible to finance and implement such non-profit
projects. Accomplishing something together – that’s
the idea behind crowdfunding.
The willingness to help has gained great momentum
in Germany. In 2014, the German crowdfunding platforms alone collected EUR 8.7 million via the Internet,
an increase of 61 % over the previous year. In this way,
it was possible to execute 1,058 projects nationwide
according to »Crowdfunding Monitor«. And this trend
is still heading upwards. Globally, crowdfunding platforms collected a total of USD 16.2 billion in 2014
according to market research company Massolution,
up from EUR 6.1 billion in the previous year.
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BW-Bank wants to encourage this
uncomplicated but effective form
of funding on a regional level. In
spring 2014, it launched a platform
known as bw-crowd.de for smallscale non-profit and social projects.
This platform can be used to present
projects in the areas of environment and social matters, art and
culture, sport and leisure, education and research and traffic and
mobility free of charge as a means
of gaining support. Each project
is presented on a separate page,
describing its goals and explaining
how the funds are to be used. The project can request
an amount of up to EUR 15,000. BW-Bank contributes
EUR 1,000 a month; from this, an amount of EUR 5 is
added to each donation of over EUR 5. The online
platform is operated in conjunction with the Stuttgart
agency fairplaid GmbH.
»Our region thrives on people and with this form of
modern sponsorship, we want to encourage their commitment and assist in ensuring that smaller projects
in particular are implemented,« says initiator Helmut
Dohmen, who is in charge of BW-Bank’s retail customer
business in the Stuttgart region. And the platform has
been very successful. In its first year of operation it
collected over EUR 150,000, funding 48 projects with
the assistance of more than 2,700 contributions and
the many small donations which came from the heart.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
Education.
Investing in education is investing in the future – and
the rewards are the highest when as much practical
training as possible is provided. As a public-sector
bank with regional roots, we take our social mandate
seriously and actively help to increase young people’s
familiarity with the business world while giving students
early guidance in choosing their career. In doing so,
we do not only want to convey knowledge but also
reinforce social skills and responsibility for the sustainable development of society.
BW-Bank’s School Service/Partnerships with
Educational Institutions
BW-Bank’s School Service supports educational institutions in the Stuttgart area with a wide variety of offerings. In practical dialog with students, for example,
BW-Bank employees explain how finance works and
what effects it has on social developments, discuss
topical issues (such as the cell phone cost trap, statutory and private pensions) with students in class, and
outline career prospects. Internships give students
an insight into everyday work at a bank and help
them make the right career choice. Applicant training
at middle schools and senior high schools prepares
final-year students to enter the workforce.
BW-Bank has an active relationship with 25 schools.
The two education partnerships which had been
forged at the beginning of 2014 were joined by a further three at the beginning of 2015. In this context,
BW-Bank employees teach on a regular basis, lending
their expertise to teachers and students. We also support other schools by helping them carry out smaller
projects.
Funding Projects at Schools
It is important to acquire sound business thinking and
practice at an early stage. Since 2013, we have invested in the funding of specific school projects that promote entrepreneurial and social responsibility as well
as in educational and career choice initiatives. We set
aside EUR 10,000 annually for these projects. In 2014,
funding applications were again submitted for some
30 projects. Support is given to efforts such as theater
performances, pedagogical circus projects, school
student exchange schemes and German-French »taster
internships«.
[email protected] Education Initiative
These days, career guidance begins long before
college entrance exams. For this reason, BW-Bank
expanded its partnership with The Boston Consulting
Group’s [email protected] initiative in the 2012/2013
school year. Through discussions with representatives
from different companies, the project provides senior
high school students with real-life knowledge and
expertise in the field of business. Currently, nine
BW-Bank employees are each coaching one team of
five to seven senior high school students over the
entire school year at three schools (Schönbuch-Gymnasium in Holzgerlingen, Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium in
Leinfelden-Echterdingen and Gymnasium Plochingen).
Kinderspielstadt Stutengarten
BW-Bank has been actively involved in Kinderspielstadt
Stutengarten as a partner since the very beginning.
During this year’s summer break from 17 August to
5 September 2015, another 1,500 or so children discovered how life in a large community works in a minivillage comprising wood cabins, containers and tents
set up in the Bad Cannstatt equestrian stadium.
Whether acting as mayor, banker or baker, the 6- to
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
13-year-olds explored more than 72 different professions and businesses through play, shaping their own
community. 16 BW-Bank apprentices were in charge
of 'their' business and provided instruction to the
children in the Stutengarten bank branch. Among the
many things, the children learned how money circulates in a city, how to invest it well, and the importance of a bank for business and society. Organized
by Stuttgarter Jugendhaus gGmbH, Kinderspielstadt
Stutengarten took place for the ninth time in 2015.
Summer Science Camp
Where does energy come from and why must it be
used sparingly? Why does a bicycle fall over when it
is standing still but not when it is being ridden? Can
robots replace people? Around 600 boys and girls
attended the Summer Science Camp from 3 to 21 August 2015, where they were able to explore exciting
topics of the future in experiments of their own, workshops and presentations. Held in Stuttgart’s Carl Benz
Arena, the three-week summer camp focused on
robotics, flying objects, mobility and energy under
the motto »Observe, understand and have a go«.
Over a number of five-day periods, 200 children aged
between eight and 14 years explored scientific and
technical questions. The purpose of the pedagogical
project is to awaken an interest in mathematics, computer science, the natural sciences and technology.
LBBW supported the Summer Science Camp, which is
organized by the Stuttgart Youth Center, as a partner.
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thereby contribute to the future viability of Germany
as a location for business. Via BW-Bank, LBBW is involved in the core School2Start-up project in which
secondary school students establish their own company. They are assisted by volunteer advisors from
BW-Bank.
»Social Class« school mentoring programs
Social skills and public spirit are crucial determinants
for the sustainable development and future viability of
society and of Germany as a place to do business. For
a number of years now, LBBW has been working with
Stuttgart-based agency mehrwert, which specializes in
projects for social learning. For example, it arranges
and oversees the »Social Project« in which all LBBW
apprentices are able to participate on a voluntary basis.
In 2015, we launched the »Social Class« project in
conjunction with mehrwert. In this way, the ninth and
ten grades of middle and high schools in the Stuttgart
region are able to apply for one of a maximum of five
school mentoring programs with their own social projects. mehrwert then oversees the development and
execution of the projects in social institutions, additionally offering workshops.
Wissensfabrik – Unternehmen für Deutschland e. V.
LBBW has been a member of Wissensfabrik, a nationwide initiative by companies and foundations to promote education and entrepreneurship in Germany,
since 2013.
»Anpfiff ins Leben« sports and exercise program
Sport can be the key to achieving sustained positive
changes in life. It strengthens the feeling of well-being
and health, self-confidence and team spirit, thus improving social skills in the interests of a responsible
approach to one’s own life and society as a whole. For
this reason, we support the non-profit organization
»Anpfiff ins Leben e.V.«, which provides a full range
of support for youth sports and cross-generation exercise particularly for amputees and disabled persons.
Wissensfabrik’s aim is to form partnerships with
educational institutions and entrepreneurs to improve
career prospects for the younger generation, and
Support for youth sport combines sport, school,
careers and social matters, thus creating the best possible prospects for participants’ personal and profes-
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
sional future. As a corporate partner, BW-Bank provides
support in the career segment, helping young people
to make the right career choices and offering them an
insight into bank operations via job fairs, for example.
In addition, LBBW made a donation to support the new
»Anpfiff ins Leben« pavilion in Sinsheim. This exercise
and meeting center for people with and without disabilities was opened on 25 March 2015, offering a program that caters for young and old. The program not
only includes sports and exercise but also a learning
workshop, the targeted promotion of reading skills,
age-appropriate language development courses, workshops for strengthening social skills and cooking,
music and nature exploration offerings. It is the first
facility in the Rhine-Neckar metropolitan region to
offer amputees and people with physical disabilities
the opportunity to enjoy popular sports.
Donations.
Giving is an important part of LBBW’s commitment
to society. Donations are primarily focused on social,
cultural and scientific projects that our sponsoring
activities and the foundations do not cover. In keeping
with our strong regional roots, we generally make
donations to recipients in our local core markets.
Last year, LBBW together with its regional customeroriented banks BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank
and LBBW Sachsen Bank made donations to a total of
521 non-profit institutions. At around EUR 220,000,
donations were again primarily made in the social area
in 2014. However, we also gave around EUR 80,000 for
cultural projects and EUR 40,000 each in the social
skills and science segments. LBBW also provides support in the event of natural disasters and other unexpected emergencies.
In addition to the amounts mentioned above, the donations distributed from BW-Bank premium savings
accounts (socially-tied purposes) permitted grants to
85 different recipients in Baden-Württemberg for social
projects. In this way, a sum of around EUR 216,000 was
collected for charitable purposes. Under this scheme,
customers acquire lottery tickets, generating income
in this way. BW-Bank then distributes a part of these
proceeds in the form of donations.
»Rest-Cent-Aktion«: Employees Rounding Down
their Salaries to Make Donations
Since 1 February 2015, all active employees of LBBW,
BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen
Bank have been able to contribute the amounts behind
the decimal point of their monthly salaries for social
benefits. These small monthly amounts of up to 99
cents per employee lead to the accumulation of a
considerable sum of money at the end of the year.
The cent amounts are automatically deducted from
participating employees’ monthly salary installments
and transferred to a temporary donation account. In
recognition of employees’ willingness to participate,
the Board of Managing Directors has agreed to make
a substantial additional contribution to the scheme
for 2015. At the same time, the Bank uses its internal
media to encourage employees to take part in the
scheme.
In 2015, two projects – one in connection with the
Ububele psycho-therapeutic advisory and training
center in South Africa and the other connected to the
Tabaluga Foundation for Children in Tutzing, Bavaria –
were selected as recipients for the donations, both
of which specifically address sick children and those
suffering from psychological trauma.
The donations collected under this scheme in 2015
plus the amount added by the Bank will be distributed
to the two institutions at the end of the year.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
Sponsoring.
As a sponsor, we support projects and cultural institutions in Baden-Württemberg as well as the regions in
which LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank and LBBW Sachsen
Bank operate. In addition to musical institutions such
as the Stuttgart Opera House, the International Bach
Academy and the National Theater Mannheim, we
also sponsor sporting events such as the STUTTGART
GERMAN MASTERS equestrian competition. Moreover,
we have been a partner to our local Bundesliga soccer
team, VfB Stuttgart, for many years now.
Foundations.
LBBW’s three foundations have provided grants totaling EUR 24 million in support of around 9,500 projects
since their establishment more than 30 years ago.
LBBW’s foundation activities aim to have as broad an
effect as possible, to promote young people and to
provide help to a continual stream of new initiatives.
In the past year, LBBW foundations in Baden-Württemberg released funds of half a million euros for a total
of 357 projects. This was the highest amount in five
years.
»Kunst und Kultur« (Art and Culture), the largest foundation, primarily supports music and literature as well
as the performing and plastic arts. Projects funded in
2014 included the »Zu Tische« exhibition at the State
Academy of Plastic Arts in Stuttgart and the HipHop
Culture Dance Contest »Ghetto Soul« organized by
HipHopCrew »True Rokin Soul« in Mannheim.
104
Our »Ausbildung, Fort- und Weiterbildung« (Education,
Training and Continuing Education) foundation supports young people’s schooling and vocational training, funding selected continuing education projects. In
2014, these included an event on »trauma pedagogy«
at St. Antoniusheim in Karlsruhe and a coaching
project by students to assist school students in
Friedrichshafen who are disadvantaged in terms of
their career prospects. As in previous years, we also
provided grants for numerous excellent dissertations.
The »Natur und Umwelt« (Nature and Environment)
foundation participates in projects aimed at protecting
domestic flora and fauna. In addition, it funds small
research projects relating to environmental and natural
protection, biology and medicine including alternative
medicine. In 2014, it supported the AnemoTec construction team of the Baden-Württemberg dual college
in Heidenheim with the completion of a prototype of
a small wind power turbine. At the same time, it made
a financial contribution to the »Feeling – Thinking –
Acting« information event organized by the »Autism
Stuttgart« association. Thanks to the publications in
the »Naturschutz im Kleinen« and »Landschaft pur«
series, the foundation is raising public awareness of
the issue of nature conservation.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | SOCIETY
Art Collection.
With more than 2,000 pieces, LBBW’s art collection is
considered one of the great corporate collections of
modern and contemporary art. The focus of the collection is on contemporary German art. In the context
of our partnership with the ZKM | Center for Art and
Media Karlsruhe/Museum of Contemporary Art and
Kunstmuseum Stuttgart (Stuttgart Art Museum), works
from the collection are made available to the public in
rotating exhibitions.
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Environment.
Efficient. Consistent.
Transparent.
Ensuring continuing business success also requires sustainable
environmental action. We therefore aim to make our business as
eco-friendly as possible while focusing on conserving resources.
Our Environmental Performance Statement documents our progress.
Financial success cannot be achieved in the long term
without taking responsibility for the environment. We
therefore attempt to limit the resources we use and
reduce the resulting emissions as well as other effects
on the environment. To measure the success of the
activities implemented, we quantify our consumption
and publish it in an annual Environmental Performance
Statement.
In 2014, further reductions in absolute and relative
(i. e. per square meter and per employee) consumption
were achieved.
106
However, in terms of absolute savings potential, the
reductions we will be able to achieve going forward
will be smaller than before, because in past years
numerous technical improvements have been reviewed
and implemented. Our efforts to improve our Environmental Performance Statement will therefore continue
to focus on further raising our employees’ awareness
of the environmental as well as financial costs of
resource consumption.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Mobile with a Single Card.
electronic ticket for buses and trains, a key for (electric) car-sharing vehicles and rented vehicles and a
card for operating green-electricity loading terminals
as well as offering a worldwide payment function. In
the future, it will also permit the use of city facilities,
for example by acting as a library card in libraries.
Nowhere in Germany is traffic congestion greater than
in Stuttgart. Commuters normally requiring 30 minutes to reach their place of work spend an average of
80 hours in traffic jams each year according to navigation services provider TomTom.
The polygoCard is world-wide first. For the first time,
it has been possible to combine in a single chip card
three established technical standards: eTicketing in
accordance with the Germany-wide standard (eTicket
Deutschland (VDV-KA)), Europe-wide payment card
specifications (Europay International, MasterCard and
VISA (EMV)) and certified security. This means that the
polygoCard can also be used for other mobility and
urban offerings. BW-Bank is responsible for developing
the payment function, which will help to foster acceptance of the card and, hence, the utilization of more
environmentally friendly means of transport.
Exhaust gases, accidents, stress – the future of urban
mobility looks different. The revolutionary study entitled »The Future of Urban Mobility« by management
consultancy Arthur D. Little states that what we need
are sustainable mobility concepts rather than an irresponsible gridlock. Cities offering intelligent mobility
cards for public transport and giving preference to pedestrians, cyclists and rental vehicles have been able
to reduce transit times while simultaneously lowering
CO2 emissions and the number of accidents.
A total of 22 partners from different industries under
the auspices of Stuttgarter Strassenbahnen AG are
working on the »Stuttgart Services« project. Investments total around EUR 25 million. This is the largest
project organized by Baden-Württemberg company
Living Lab BWe mobil and is receiving funding of
EUR 9.5 million from the German Federal Ministry for
Economic Affairs and Energy under the German federal
government’s »Schaufenster Elektromobilität« (Electromobility Showcase) initiative.
Time to change. And this change should be as convenient as possible with a minimum impact on the environment and the climate. The multifunction polygoCard, initially available to VVS season ticket holders in
Stuttgart from 2015, achieves precisely this. It is an
Further information:
www.mypolygo.de, http://www.livinglab-bwe.de,
http://schaufenster-elektromobilitaet.org
(available only in German)
Photo: Stuttgart Services
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RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Environmental Performance and
Consumption of Resources.
The following tables provide an overview of LBBW’s
environmental performance and the resources used in
our business operations in recent years. The calculation and presentation of our key figures are based on
the current VfU Indicators, the standards defined by
Verein für Umweltmanagement und Nachhaltigkeit in
Finanzinstituten e.V. (VfU – Association for Environmental Management and Sustainability in Financial
Institutions).
Conversion Factors according to VfU Indicators (Updated in 2013)
Primary energy
1.226 kWh/kWh
0.0141 kg/kWh
District heating (supplier mix)
0.455 kWh/kWh
0.10 kg/kWh
Train travel
0.225 kWh/km
0.0478 kg/km
Road travel
1.344 kWh/km
0.285 kg/km
Short-distance air travel
0.911 kWh/km
0.1953 kg/km
Long-distance air travel*
0.454 kWh/km
0.1085 kg/km
Virgin paper (chlorine-bleached)
16.991 kWh/kg
1.203 kg/kg
Virgin paper, elemental chlorine free (ECF) and totally chlorine free (TCF)
16.308 kWh/kg
1.203 kg/kg
Recycled paper (post-consumer)
Potable water
Waste (incinerated)
Waste (landfill)
* The Radiative Forcing Index (RFI) is not included in the VfU conversion factors for air travel.
RFI measures the amplified greenhouse effect of aircraft emissions at high flight altitudes.
108
CO2
Electricity (hydroelectric)
6.206 kWh/kg
1.196 kg/kg
0.003006 kWh/l
0.000749 kg/l
0.12 kWh/kg
0.505 kg/kg
0.1117 kWh/kg
0.56 kg/kg
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Environmental Performance and Consumption of Resources
LBBW (Bank), including BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank, LBBW Sachsen Bank and LBBW GastroEvent GmbH,
LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH (including BW Immobilien GmbH) and LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
Performance Data
2010
2011
20121
2013
2014
Input
138,837,983
127,459,103
122,394,515
120,895,216
117,838,391
87,311,750
82,422,506
81,508,358
79,182,731
78,135,130
100
100
100
100
100
thereof: Electricity consumption –
building operation
64,311,750
60,162,330
59,284,389
55,091,094
59,340,084
thereof: Electricity consumption – data centers,
Including cooling
23,000,000
22,260,176
22,223,969
24,091,637
18,795,0465
51,526,233
45,036,597
40,886,157
36,889,919
31,060,919
41,712,485
39,703,261
Energy in kWh
thereof: Electricity
thereof: From renewable
energy sources (%)
thereof: Heating energy (district heating),
not adjusted for weather
thereof: Heating energy (district heating),
adjusted for weather
Water (m3) 2
Office paper (sheets)4
thereof: Copy paper in kg4
Printed advertising matter in kg
366,7043
357,2743
338,3573
321,9973
297,028
248,555,698
181,580,291
224,344,660
144,716,700
110,325,450
640,929
561,862
584,171
514,039
483,822
502,157
488,361
434,300
356,811
345,968
Transportation in km
35,431,915
32,579,517
33,008,108
31,576,584
30,967,944
thereof: By train
12,329,799
11,333,012
11,294,729
10,757,086
10,506,555
thereof: By car
12,828,719
12,042,673
13,196,360
12,885,693
12,942,626
thereof: By plane
10,273,397
9,203,832
8,517,019
7,933,805
7,518,763
2,279,649
2,144,107
2,332,702
2,285,283
2,233,291
Output
Waste (kg)
Emissions in kg:
15,733,312
14,212,486
11,941,295
11,434,519
10,544,136
SO2
CO2 equivalents
21,110
18,662
17,830
16,627
15,283
NOx
54,068
48,165
45,737
42,507
38,604
PM
3,037
2,747
2,771
2,665
2,568
Including LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH since 2012.
The quantities listed represent drinking water from the public supply. Waste water is disposed of in the regular sewer system; there is no direct release into
natural waters. In view of the substances it contains, the water discharged by LBBW has no effect on biodiversity.
3 Water consumption is extrapolated. Following a correction in the data collected it was necessary to restate the figure for the previous years.
4 Since 1 September 2013, office paper has been purchased to some extent by IT service provider Finanz Informatik Technologie Service, not by LBBW itself.
Due to the outsourcing of IT activities, this consumption figure is no longer included in LBBW’s Environmental Performance Statement.
5 Electricity for the data center was recorded using sub-meters for the first time in 2014; this will permit more precise calculations of consumption in the future.
1
2
109
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Performance Data
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
General data
Employees (FTEs)1
Area (m2)
9,788
8,769
9,890
9,750
9,548
464,445
449,360
422,474
414,412
398,535
47
51
43
43
42
Area per employee (m2) 2
1
2
Number of full-time employees and part-time employees expressed as full-time employees.
Area per employee also includes service, utility and infrastructure areas such as corridors, reception and entry areas, data centers, training, conference and
meeting rooms, kitchens and canteens.
The entire energy consumption of the data center at
the Am Hauptbahnhof building was estimated in earlier
years on the basis of the electricity consumption
measured and a part of the refrigeration energy used;
the latter could not be calculated precisely. Now that
the data center has been outsourced, a more precise
solution for calculating consumption has been imple-
mented. As of this year, we are therefore calculating
the total energy volume in terms of power usage effectiveness (PUE) based on the electricity consumed by
the data center. Accordingly, the irregularities do not
reflect any changes in consumption but are due to the
adoption of a new measuring system.
Sealed Surfaces at the Validated Locations in 2014
Location
Sealed floor area in m2
Share in total floor area
of the location in question
Stuttgart
Am Hauptbahnhof
33,189
37.5 %
Pariser Platz
16,111
30.5 %
Königstrasse
4,761
40.1 %
Bollwerk
7,195
30.0 %
Kleiner Schlossplatz
3,000
19.0 %
9,525
56.1 %
Mannheim
110
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Key figures
LBBW (Bank) including BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank, LBBW Sachsen Bank and LBBW GastroEvent GmbH,
LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH (including BW Immobilien GmbH) and LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Electricity consumption in kWh/m2 (including data centers)
188
183
193
191
1963
Electricity consumption in kWh/m2 (not including data centers)
138
134
140
133
1493
8,920
9,399
8,241
8,121
8,184
111
100
97
Energy efficiency
Electricity consumption in kWh/employee
Heating energy usage in
kWh/m2,
not adjusted for weather
Heating energy usage in kWh/m2, adjusted for weather
Heating energy usage in kWh/employee, not adjusted for weather
78
100
3,784
3,253
5,264
5,136
4,134
4,278
4,158
0
0
0
0
0
1501
1631
1371
1321
124
1
1
1
1
1
25,394
20,707
22,684
14,8432
11,5552
65
64
59
532
512
Heating energy usage in kWh/employee, adjusted for weather
Ratio of input (energy purchased)/output (self-produced energy)
89
101
Water
Water usage in liters/employee/day
Ratio of input (drinking water)/output (waste water)
Materials efficiency
Paper consumption in sheets/employee
Copy paper in kg/employee
Printed advertising matter in kg/employee
51
56
44
37
36
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.7
0.7
Copy paper in %
84
86
82
81
83
Printed advertising matter in %
19
10
13
10
14
3,620
3,715
3,338
3,239
3,244
233
245
236
234
234
CO2 emissions from electricity, heating in kg/employee
894
882
530
492
441
CO2 emissions from travel in kg/employee
569
582
542
531
534
Ratio of input (copy paper, printed advertising matter)/output (paper)
Share recycled
Business travel
Business travel in km/employee
Waste
Waste volume in kg/employee
Emissions
Water consumption is extrapolated. Following a correction in the data collected it was necessary to restate the figure for the previous years.
2 Since 1 September 2013, office paper has been purchased to some extent by IT service provider Finanz Informatik Technologie Service, not by LBBW itself.
Due to the outsourcing of IT activities, this consumption figure is no longer included in LBBW’s Environmental Performance Statement.
3 Electricity for the data center was recorded using sub-meters for the first time in 2014; this will permit more precise calculations of consumption in the
future. The electricity consumption of the data center measured in 2014 was lower than had been assumed in previous years; the consumption for building
operation was higher. This resulted in an increase in relative electricity consumption excluding the data center. However, absolute electricity consumption
continued to decline in 2014.
1
111
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
CO2 Emissions
Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the only greenhouse gas produced at LBBW in relevant quantities. We are working
toward continually shrinking our carbon dioxide footprint. All of the LBBW, BW-Bank and LBBW RheinlandPfalz Bank office buildings have been supplied with
hydroelectricity since 2009. This resulted in savings of
over 50 % in absolute carbon dioxide emissions in
2009 compared with the previous year. In addition,
carbon dioxide emissions were reduced by more than
40 % from 2009 to 2014 thanks to technical and organizational optimization.
112
Accordingly, we have long since exceeded the target
defined in our Guidelines for Sustainability (25 % reduction in absolute carbon dioxide emissions by 2020
compared with 2009). Emissions per employee were
cut by just under 40 % between 2009 and 2014.
In 2014, the absolute figure was around 8 % and
the figure per employee just under 6 % down on the
previous year.
In addition, LBBW offset a total of 8.38 tonnes of
CO2 in 2014 (previous year: 6.66 tonnes) by sending
parcels and packages using Deutsche Post DHL’s
GoGreen service.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
CO2 Equivalents
LBBW (Bank), including BW-Bank, LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz
Bank, LBBW Sachsen Bank and LBBW GastroEvent
GmbH, LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH (including BW Immobilien GmbH) and LBBW Asset Management Investmentgesellschaft mbH.
Absolute
Figures in kg
CO2 Emissions in 2014 –
Breakdown by Emissions Sources*
Electricity (10.5 %)
Heating (29.5 %)
Travel (48.4 %)
Paper (6 %)
Waste (3.5 %)
Water (2.1 %)
Relative
Figures in kg
per Employee
2010
15,733,312
1,607
2011
14,212,486
1,621
2012*
11,941,294
1,207
2013
11,434,519
1,173
2014
10,544,136
1,104
* All of the LBBW, BW-Bank and LBBW Rheinland-Pfalz Bank office buildings
have been supplied with hydroelectricity since 2009. The share of CO2
emissions accounted for by electricity is therefore relatively low at LBBW.
* Including LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH since 2012.
CO2 Emissions in Absolute and Relative
(per Employee) Figures
kg
kg/employee
60,000,000
7,000
50,000,000
6,000
5,000
40,000,000
4,000
30,000,000
20,000,000
3,000
1,607
1,621
10,000,000
0
2010
2011
1,207
2012
1,173
2013
1,104
2014
2,000
1,000
0
Year
absolute figures in kg
relative figures in kg per employee
113
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Categorization of Sources of Emissions in Accordance with the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol
Scope
Emission source
(CO2 in kg)*
Scope 1
Diesel for emergency generator at Pariser Platz
and Bollwerk:
11,162
All emissions that are directly caused or can
be controlled by the company, e. g. through
the combustion of fossil fuels or the operation
of its own fleet.
Scope 2
All emissions arising from the provision of
energy for a company, e. g. the delivery of
electricity or district heating. The emissions
are generated by the external utility.
Scope 3
All emissions induced by the activities of the
company but arising elsewhere. This includes,
for example, emissions arising along the
supply chain or through the use of products.
Further examples: Employees’ travel to work,
company travel by rail, taxi, air or rental
vehicles, paper consumption, water consumption.
Electricity:
1,101,705
4,207,797
Heating/district heating:
3,106,092
Car (rental car, taxi or LBBW employees’
private cars):
1,736,861
Rail:
502,213
Air:
909,049
Water:
222,474
Printed advertising matter:
57,929
Waste:
365,637
We currently have no means of recording these
emissions correctly and in full. Similarly, there are
at present no relevant recognized standards.
Conversion factors according to VfU indicators (updated in 2013).
114
1,962,949
Own vehicles (pool, department, company and
service vehicles):
1,951,787
Copy paper:
579,227
»Emissions from investments« are also
relevant for the financial area.
Total
(CO2 in kg)*
4,373,390
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Air Pollutants in 2013*
Performance Data
Air Pollutants in kg
km
NOx
SO2
Dust
Business travel by car (gasoline)
3,527,562
590
2,040
67
Business travel by car (diesel)
9,358,131
2,114
4,280
681
Business travel by train
10,757,086
1,258
1,437
111
Business travel by plane (short distances)
1,460,522
1,496
2,277
30
Business travel by plane (long distances)
6,473,283
4,413
5,673
kWh
Electricity
79,182,731
Heating energy
36,889,919
Total air pollutants (kg)
Air pollutants (kg/employee)
NOx
SO2
1,098
6,624
86
Dust
1,243
5,658
20,177
447
16,627
42,507
2,665
1.68
4.30
0.27
Air Pollutants in 2014*
Performance Data
Air Pollutants in kg
km
SO2
NOx
Dust
Business travel by car (gasoline)
3,589,152
600
2,075
68
Business travel by car (diesel)
9,353,474
2,113
4,277
681
10,506,555
1,229
1,403
108
Business travel by train
Business travel by plane (short distances)
1,074,457
1,101
1,675
22
Business travel by plane (long distances)
6,444,306
4,393
5,647
86
kWh
SO2
NOx
Dust
Electricity
78,135,130
1,083
6,536
1,227
Heating energy
31,060,919
4,764
16,989
376
15,283
38,604
2,568
1.60
4.04
0.27
Total air pollutants (kg)
Air pollutants (kg/employee)
* Conversion factors in accordance with GEMIS 2004.
LBBW’s cooling systems are checked regularly for leaks.
In 2014, there was no loss of coolants.
115
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Energy Used in Facility Management.
LBBW’s annual energy bill totals approximately
EUR 14.7 million for electricity and EUR 3.3 million
for heating. Cutting back on these expenses holds
not only enormous environmental potential, but also
financial potential.
efficiency measures, we therefore concentrate primarily
on these buildings. For instance, a heat pump in the
Am Hauptbahnhof 2 building in Stuttgart has been
used to recycle the waste heat from the data center
since November 2012. In 2014, over 3,600 MWh of
refrigeration energy and around 5,500 MWh of heating
energy were saved as a result of investments of
around EUR 800,000.
Our headquarters buildings are responsible for the
majority of LBBW’s total energy usage. In terms of
identifying savings potential and introducing energy
Electricity Usage in Absolute Figures
(kWh per Building)
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Karlsruhe
1,128,668
1,080,965
Leipzig
1,839,600
1,784,481
1,710,123
1,346,417
1,311,206
Mainz
5,243,404
4,173,860
3,054,515
2,935,250
2,829,960
Mannheim
2,244,590
2,758,443
2,770,332
2,333,689
2,436,969
32,243,547
30,235,253
30,584,402
30,647,925
31,588,567
1,055,810
1,054,202
1,088,360
Stuttgart
Am Hauptbahnhof
thereof: Building operation
14,520,333
13,375,879
14,876,324
15,365,780
21,544,639
thereof: Data center
17,723,214
16,859,664
15,708,078
15,282,145
10,043,9283
7,877,079
7,241,841
7,683,548
Pariser Platz1
8,603,910
7,954,979
Königstrasse
4,528,513
3,639,728
3,971,803
4,090,166
4,100,929
Kronprinzstrasse 6
723,804
395,114
Bldg. empty
Bldg. empty
Bldg. empty
Kronprinzstrasse 8
1,123,989
1,082,585
945,147
849,604
4
11,566,948
11,421,510
12,000,423
12,446,674
12,378,302
thereof: Building operation
6,290,162
6,020,998
5,484,532
3,637,182
3,627,184
thereof: Data center
5,276,786
5,400,512
6,515,891
8,809,492
8,751,118
2,997,520
3,155,581
3,491,071
3,540,580
3,422,399
11,294,890
Bollwerk1, 2
Kleiner Schlossplatz
Branches and other administrative buildings
15,067,257
14,740,007
14,047,653
12,696,383
Total
87,311,750
82,422,506
81,508,358
79,182,731
78,135,130
Total, not including data centers
64,311,750
60,162,330
59,284,389
55,091,094
59,340,084
The emergency generators at the Pariser Platz and Bollwerk buildings are tested monthly. Usage amounts to around 3,500 liters of diesel per year.
In the Bollwerk building, the PUE figure (PUE=Power Usage Effectiveness) was taken into account for the first time in 2013, i. e. the electricity used by the
ventilation and cooling systems, the uninterruptible power supply and lighting was included in the calculation. For this reason, consumption by the data
center is higher but the figure for the building’s technical systems is lower in 2013 compared with the previous year.
3 Electricity for the data center was recorded using sub-meters for the first time in 2014; this will permit more precise calculations of consumption in the future.
4 As only a small part of the building in Kronprinzstrasse 8 is being used, the consumption figures were allocated to Branches and other administrative buildings
in 2014.
1
2
116
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Electricity Usage
in Relative Figures
(kWh/m2
per Building)
Incl.
data
centers
20101
Not
incl.
data
centers
2010
Karlsruhe
Incl.
data
centers
20111
Not
incl.
data
centers
2011
Incl.
data
centers
20121
Not
incl.
data
centers
2012
Incl.
data
centers
20131
Not
incl.
data
centers
2013
Incl.
data
centers
20141
Not
incl.
data
centers
2014
72
69
67
67
69
Leipzig
121
118
113
103
101
Mainz
138
114
90
86
83
Mannheim
132
163
163
138
144
Stuttgart
Am Hauptbahnhof
364
200
342
191
Pariser Platz
163
151
Königstrasse
346
168
346
149
174
357
244
137
145
354
285
311
344
Kronprinzstrasse 6
37
33
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Kronprinzstrasse 8
156
150
172
155
2
2
152
516
151
Bollwerk
482
262
476
251
500
229
519
345
Kleiner Schlossplatz
190
200
221
224
216
Branches and other
administrative buildings
95
97
99
93
90
Weighted average
188
138
183
134
193
140
191
133
196
149
1 The
2
data centers are located in the Am Hauptbahnhof and Bollwerk buildings.
As only a small part of the building in Kronprinzstrasse 8 is being used, the consumption figures were allocated to Branches and other administrative buildings.
Electricity Usage in Absolute and Relative
(per Employee) Figures
Electricity Usage in Absolute and Relative
(per m2) Figures
kWh/
kWh
95,000,000
90,000,000
85,000,000
80,000,000
75,000,000
70,000,000
65,000,000
60,000,000
55,000,000
employee
13,000
8,920
9,399
11,000
8,241
8,121
8,184
9,000
7,000
5,000
3,000
1,000
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
0
kWh
95,000,000
90,000,000
85,000,000
80,000,000
75,000,000
70,000,000
65,000,000
60,000,000
55,000,000
196
193
188
2010
183
2011
relative figures in kWh per employee
2012
2013
2014
Year
Year
absolute figures in kWh
191
kWh/m2
220
215
210
205
200
195
190
185
180
absolute figures in kWh
relative figures in kWh per m2
117
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Heating Energy Usage in
Absolute Figures
(kWh per Building)1
Karlsruhe
2010
2011
2012
2013
Usage
2013
(adjusted
for
weather)
2014
Usage
2014
(adjusted
for
weather)
745,170
514,430
604,380
678,710
814,452
478,150
678,973
1,668,299
1,129,004
1,217,812
1,105,755
1,183,158
857,934
1,046,679
Mainz
4,113,352
3,279,125
2,810,401
3,233,865
3,815,960
2,715,709
3,829,150
Mannheim
1,599,931
1,567,932
1,891,762
1,929,597
2,296,221
1,856,969
2,655,466
Leipzig
Stuttgart
Am Hauptbahnhof
10,382,193
8,516,095
7,945,551
5,002,237
5,652,528
3,806,487
5,138,757
Pariser Platz
5,280,660
3,690,200
4,472,560
4,954,700
5,598,811
4,524,240
6,107,724
Königstrasse
2,233,973
1,663,198
1,983,376
1,964,204
2,219,550
1,119,796
1,511,725
Kronprinzstrasse 6
2,093,253
1,255,952
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Kronprinzstrasse 8
504,140
383,483
374,632
164,484
200,671
2
2
Bollwerk
3,073,712
2,191,930
3,425,791
2,652,429
2,970,720
2,170,062
2,907,883
Kleiner Schlossplatz
1,710,128
1,628,443
1,613,139
1,664,362
1,880,729
1,617,970
2,184,260
Branches and other
administrative buildings
18,121,422
19,216,805
14,546,753
13,539,576
15,079,685
11,913,602
13,642,644
Total
51,526,233
45,036,597
40,886,157
36,889,919
41,712,485
31,060,919
39,703,261
1 LBBW’s
2
118
headquarters buildings are supplied with district heating.
As only a small part of the building in Kronprinzstrasse 8 is being used, the consumption figures were allocated to »Branches and other administrative buildings«
in 2014.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Heating Energy Usage
in Relative Figures
(kWh/m2 per Building)1
2010
2011
2012
47
33
39
43
52
30
43
Leipzig
110
74
80
85
91
66
80
Mainz
108
89
83
95
112
80
113
94
92
112
114
135
109
157
Am Hauptbahnhof
117
96
90
57
64
43
58
Pariser Platz
100
70
85
94
106
86
116
Karlsruhe
Mannheim
2013
Usage
2013
(adjusted
for
weather)
2014
Usage
2014
(adjusted
for
weather)
Stuttgart
Königstrasse
175
130
155
165
187
94
127
Kronprinzstrasse 6
107
104
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Bldg.
empty
Kronprinzstrasse 8
70
53
68
30
37
2
2
Bollwerk
128
91
143
111
124
90
121
Kleiner Schlossplatz
108
103
102
105
119
102
138
Branches and other
administrative buildings
115
127
103
99
111
95
108
Weighted average
111
100
97
89
101
78
100
1 LBBW’s
2
headquarters buildings are supplied with district heating.
As only a small part of the building in Kronprinzstrasse 8 is being used, the consumption figures were allocated to Branches and other administrative buildings
in 2014.
Heating Energy Usage in Absolute and Relative
(per m2) Figures*
kWh
62,000,000
58,000,000
54,000,000
50,000,000
46,000,000
42,000,000
38,000,000
34,000,000
30,000,000
111
100
2010
2011
97
2012
101
100
2013
2014
kWh/m2
150
140
130
120
110
100
90
80
70
Year
absolute figures in kWh
relative figures in kWh per m2
* Adjusted for weather from 2013 onward.
119
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
IT Energy Usage.
As at 1 September 2013, parts of the data center
were outsourced to the IT services company Finanz
Informatik. Sustainability guidelines were included in
the contract.
Numerous projects aimed at reducing energy
consumption were implemented, e. g.
■
■
■
■
120
8,300 PCs and 1,200 notebooks replaced by
energy-efficient models (power usage now only 50 W
instead of 70 – 100 W before). Period: 11/2013 to
9/2014.
Storage consolidation (consolidation of data from
local server storage to a central storage unit):
– expanding hard disk space while reducing energy
usage by around 40 %,
– reducing energy usage for data back-up systems
by around 45 % by updating technology,
Server virtualization (parallel operation of various
server systems on a physical computer through the
use of special software and hardware technology).
Currently 50 % physical servers, 50 % virtual servers
(July 2015).
IT measures to conserve resources:
– black-and-white printing set as the default mode
for multifunctional devices. Goal: reducing color
printing by around one third,
– elimination of automatic printing of fax logs.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Paper Usage.
We take efforts to economize and be efficient when
using paper, and ensure that the paper we use is sustainable. As a rule, we do not use any paper containing pulp from tropical wood. In accordance with the
»Sustainable Procurement and Contract Award« Work
Instruction, all paper and printed matter must contain
the greatest possible percentage of recycled material.
If recycled paper cannot be used, we prefer FSC-certified paper from sustainable forests.
Office Paper in Absolute and Relative (per Employee) Figures
Sheets/employee
Sheets
30,000
260,000,000
28,000
240,000,000
220,000,000
26,000
25,394
24,000
22,684
200,000,000
22,000
20,000
180,000,000
20,707
160,000,000
18,000
14,843
140,000,000
14,000
11,555 12,000
120,000,000
In 2014, the share of recycled copy paper used came
to 83 %. In the previous year, this figure was 81 %.
100,000,000
10,000
2010
2011
Since 1 September 2013, office paper has been purchased to some extent by IT service provider Finanz
Informatik Technologie Service, not LBBW itself. Due
to the outsourcing of IT activities, this consumption
figure is no longer included in LBBW’s Environmental
Performance Statement.
2012
2013
2014
Year
absolute figures in sheets
Since 2011, 30 % of the recycled paper we use has
been CO2 neutral. The CO2 emissions unavoidable in
the production of this paper are compensated for by
the paper manufacturers.
16,000
relative figures in sheets per employee
Printed Advertising Matter in Absolute and Relative
(per Employee) Figures
kg
kg/employee
70
600,000
500,000
400,000
60
51
50
56
40
44
300,000
37
200,000
30
36
20
100,000
0
10
0
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Year
absolute figure in kg
relative figure in kg per employee
Recycling Rate for Copy Paper
%
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
16
14
18
19
17
84
86
82
81
83
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Year
recycled
non-chlorine breached
121
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Introduction of the »Electronic File« and Electronic
Correspondence in Development Loan Business
As a Landesbank, LBBW assists the savings banks in its
region and their customers interested in the various
development programs offered by the federal government, the state government and the EU for commercial, residential, municipal and social projects. In April
2014, we introduced the »electronic file« (e-file) and
electronic correspondence to reduce resource requirements and to make work processes more efficient for
both parties. In this way, swift, paperless communications are possible between LBBW, the savings banks
and the development institutions. The entire correspondence is scanned, processed electronically and
stored in an electronic archive. LBBW Service GmbH
ensures access to the information. With this step, we
want to reduce paper consumption by more than
2.1 million sheets a year from 2015. Similarly, a total
of around 36,700 folders made from robust cardboard
can now also be dispensed with. Electricity and toner
requirements for printing will also be substantially
reduced. The savings banks and funding institutions
offer further scope for reducing usage.
When choosing a mode of transportation, and planning
and taking trips, environmental issues are considered
along with financial concerns. LBBW’s travel rules require that train travel be given preference over travel
by car. Air travel, in turn, should only be selected if the
flight represents a documentable time savings for the
entire trip of at least two hours, or if the cost of the
trip is less expensive than comparable train tickets.
Business Travel in Absolute and Relative
(per Employee) Figures
km/employee
km
4,500
45,000,000
40,000,000
35,000,000
3,620
4,000
3,715
3,338
3,239
3,244
3,500
30,000,000
3,000
25,000,000
2,500
20,000,000
2,000
15,000,000
1,500
10,000,000
1,000
500
5,000,000
0
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
0
Year
absolute figures in km
relative figures in km per employee
Transportation.
Banking is fundamentally a personal business that
is based on direct contact between people. This is
why our employees are often on the road developing
optimal solutions in dialog with customers on site, or
working with colleagues from other offices. Business
trips also include travel to seminars and conferences.
122
As a whole, the number of kilometers traveled on
company business was additionally reduced in 2014.
The average distance per employee was virtually
unchanged. Compared with 2010, the total volume
of company travel has dropped by around one-tenth.
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Kilometers Traveled by Type of Transportation
%
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
34.8
34.8
34.2
34.1
33.9
36.2
37.0
40.0
40.8
41.8
29.0
28.3
25.8
25.1
24.3
2010
2011
2012
2013
Since 1 April 2013, all bahn.corporate customers,
including LBBW’s employees, have been using 100 %
green electricity for their Deutsche Bahn (DB) longdistance trips. This means that our business trips on
DB are almost carbon neutral. Since July 2015, new CO2
limits of between 130 and 150 g/km (dependent on
the management level) have been applicable to company cars (LBBW vehicles which management staff
have the use of). An additional payment is required
if the CO2 limits are exceeded, while vehicles falling
short of this limit are subject to special preferential
treatment.
2014
Year
by plane
by car
by train
Broken down by individual forms of transportation,
the picture has remained relatively constant over the
years: At just under 42 %, travel by car again accounted
for the largest portion in 2014, with a slightly rising
trend. This was followed by train travel (around 34 %).
Air travel accounted for the lowest share (24 %), declining
by around five percentage points compared with 2010.
Our goals remain to raise awareness among employees for reducing air and automobile travel to only what
is absolutely necessary and to further increase the use
of possible technical alternatives, such as phone and
video conferences. Currently, 33 video conference
rooms in total are available at 18 locations in Germany
and abroad (as at March 2015).
Car trips comprise business trips taken in privately
owned passenger vehicles, in rental cars and in pool,
departmental, company and service vehicles. In this
connection, travel in departmental cars continued to
decline, whereas the use of private and pool vehicles
rose slightly over the previous year.
Since personal and business travel habits are usually
very similar, we also inform employees about options
for making their personal trips or commutes more environmentally friendly. These include the wide variety
of commuter passes available in cities such as Stuttgart, Mannheim, Karlsruhe and Mainz in particular.
For the company and service vehicle categories, we
are able to report the amount of fuel actually used
in addition to the kilometer figures included in the
Environmental Performance Statement:
Usage in Liters
2013
2014
Diesel
2013
2014
Gasoline
Company vehicles
400,185
399,381
87,562
72,331
Service vehicles
573,525
557,072
43,108
44,392
Total
973,710
956,453
130,670
116,723
123
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Car Pooling
Since June 2015, our employees have been able to
register with the »TwoGo by SAP« car-pooling platform
in a one-year pilot project. By visiting a special portal,
they are able to place private car-pooling offers and
requests visible only to other LBBW employees.
What makes the »TwoGo by SAP« system special is
that when an offer and request match, the driver and
passenger are notified and the arrangement is automatically finalized. This dispenses with the need to
browse through catalogs.
LBBW is covering the licence fees for the use of
»TwoGo by SAP«. Employees only bear the tax and
social-security contributions on the non-cash benefit
which they may receive. The amounts are automatically deducted from their monthly salary.
Cooperation with DB CarSharing and DB Call-a-Bike
All customers of LBBW with an »extend« value-added
account receive discounts on the use of DB CarSharing
vehicles (including DB Flinkster vehicles, which are
available in large numbers in Stuttgart and Cologne)
and the DB Call-a-Bike service. Nearly all LBBW employees have this type of account and can therefore also
benefit from these discounts. Combining train travel
with DB CarSharing vehicles allows road mileage to be
shifted to rail.
124
polygoCard for E-Mobility in Stuttgart
Intelligent mobility concepts for urban regions reduce
CO2 emissions, lessen the likelihood of road accidents
and also shorten travel times in urban public transport. For this reason, BW-Bank is participating in the
development of a multifunction service card for Stuttgart to encourage the use of environmentally friendly
transportation, i. e. buses and trains, electric cars and
e-bikes as well as car-sharing and bicycle-sharing platforms (see p. 107).
Further information: www.mypolygo.de
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Waste.
As a financial institution, we have a particular obligation to handle customer data with care and to protect
it. The same applies to the disposal of paper. Our
waste disposal plan therefore guarantees strict compliance with the Datenschutzgesetz (German Data Protection Act). Employees are responsible for throwing away
paper subject to data protection in centrally located
data security containers. The documents collected are
destroyed in accordance with the German Data Protection Act.
Waste Volume
We also ensure that valuable resources are recycled.
All employees are required to consistently separate
their garbage. A box for scrap paper is set out at
each workplace. Step trash cans are located centrally
for organic waste, packaging and unrecyclable waste.
2012 (kg)
2013 (kg)
2014 (kg)
Non-hazardous
Regular paper (15 01 01)
378,214
351,492
373,144
Security paper (15 01 01S)
906,380
897,205
757,902
1,284,594
1,248,697
1,131,046
Paper, total
Glass (20 01 02)
10,005
8,795
9,863
Metal (15 01 04)
19,375
17,380
15,020
Plastic (15 01 02)
4,240
1,273
173
Wood (17 02 01)
55,000
70,190
23,920
Compostable waste (20 02 01)
14,781
23,278
25,479
175,411
183,189
374,233
0
0
634
29,187
37,566
38,644
Mixed materials (15 01 06)
227,144
140,464
76,164
Non-recyclable waste (20 03 01)
262,741
278,252
270,425
4,299
13,793
8,363
Organic kitchen waste (20 01 08)
Edible oils/fats (20 01 25)
Electronic scrap (16 02 14)
Security plastics (15 01 02S)
Sludges/grease separators (02 02 04)
Sub-total non-hazardous materials
220,325
255,025
257,700
2,307,102
2,277,902
2,231,664
125
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Waste Volume
2012 (kg)
2013 (kg)
2014 (kg)
Hazardous waste*
Other hazardous waste
Lead batteries (16 06 01)
Insulation materials (17 06 03)
127
2,314
859
0
90
0
370
75
0
Fluorescent tubes (20 01 21)
0
392
0
Solids from oil/water separators (13 05 01)
0
3,000
0
23,995
912
768
1,108
578
0
25,600
7,381
1,627
Total
2,332,702
2,285,283
2,233,291
Waste recycled
1,563,406
1,482,802
1,580,368
Monitors, battery-operated devices (16 02 13)
Electronic scrap (20 01 35)
Sub-total hazardous waste
* Hazardous and unrecyclable waste are processed or disposed of in German facilities. These wastes are not transported outside of Germany.
The volume of hazardous wastes has dropped sharply.
This is due to the fact that IT operations have been
outsourced to Finanz Informatik Technologie Service,
meaning that the waste arising here is no longer included in LBBW’s Environmental Performance Statement. Similarly, wood waste has declined for the same
reason as IT equipment is delivered on disposable
pallets, which are now no longer recorded in LBBW’s
Environmental Performance Statement.
Lead batteries, insulation materials, fluorescent tubes,
waste from oil/water separators and electronic scrap
are collected over a certain period and then disposed
of on a bulk basis. As no waste was disposed of in
2014, a figure of 'zero' was recorded.
Organic waste from the cafeterias is transported to
biogas facilities and recycled to produce energy.
Waste Volume (Including Recyclables) of the Validated Sites
2010
kg
126
2011
kg/employee
kg
2012
kg/employee
kg
2013
kg/employee
kg
2014
kg/employee
kg
kg/employee
Am Hauptbahnhof 2
482,767
169
484,449
248
427,474
94
400,329
92
374,608
85
Pariser Platz
171,643
–
205,323
–
224,537
543
273,499
621
246,165
498
Bollwerk
60,642
162
68,583
227
56,287
98
60,073
107
70,211
125
Königstrasse
21,975
174
18,938
142
201,757
1,009
28,880
187
35,113
224
Kleiner Schlossplatz
311,293
Including Kronprinzstrasse
473
205,520
360
225,591
840
209,135
634
153,489
476
Mannheim
171
150,088
447
82,151
268
91,372
298
55,410
182
65,241
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
Water.
Waste Volume in Absolute and Relative
(per Employee) Figures
Water Usage in Absolute and Relative
(per Employee and Day) Figures*
kg
kg/employee
320
2,800,000
300
2,600,000
m3
400,000
280
2,400,000
260
2,200,000
2,000,000
245
233
240
236
234
234
2012
2013
2014
1,800,000
2010
2011
163
350,000
300,000
137
150
220
200,000
200
150,000
relative figures in kg per employee
124
20131
2014
250,000
20101
20111
Year
absolute figures in kg
132
20121
liters/
employee/day
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Year
absolute figures in m3
relative figures in liters/employee/day
*The quantities listed represent drinking water from the public supply.
1 Water consumption is extrapolated. Following a correction in the data collected it was necessary to restate the figure for the previous years.
Biodiversity.
Pollution of the environment, soil surface sealing and
the unbridled extraction of natural resources are endangering the biological diversity of our planet. The
speed with which plant and animal species are becoming extinct has never been as fast as today. Ecosystems are becoming unbalanced, and biodiversity is
endangered worldwide.
Companies are called to take notice of the effects of
their business activities on local and global biodiversity
and to contribute to their preservation. The destruction of ecosystems does not just have environmental
effects – there are economic consequences as well.
The preservation of biological diversity is part of our
aim to contribute to sustainable and balanced economic, environmental and social development.
We promote biodiversity with the following activities:
■ We apply biodiversity criteria in our investing and
lending business. Biodiversity issues are included in
the analysis when we select the investment universe
for our sustainable investment products. In the
financing review process (see p. 68 f.), the questions
regarding reputation/sustainability criteria for use
in dialog with customers also include biodiversity
issues, such as whether virgin forest will be cleared
or endangered species threatened.
127
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
■
■
We also raise our employees’ awareness of the issue
of protecting species and the importance of ecosystems using the LBBW Intranet, where we have published facts and figures concerning the economic
importance of biodiversity and the opportunities
and risks for financial services providers.
The »Natur und Umwelt« (Nature and Environment)
foundation participates in projects aimed at protecting domestic flora and fauna. In addition, it funds
small research projects relating to environmental
and natural protection, biology and medicine including alternative medicines.
LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH is currently
involved in projects which include the following:
■
Heidelberg: Europe’s largest Passivhaus (passive
house) community in the Bahnstadt neighborhood
Heidelberg’s Bahnstadt neighborhood has become a
benchmark project for green building, climate protection and environmental city planning. The largest
Passivhaus community in Europe has been built in
this new city district. This is where, in summer 2014,
LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH completed
the »Urban Green« project, which was awarded a
silver certificate by DGNB. The site comprises 65
condominiums and 53 rental apartments around a
park-like inner courtyard. Six stores and commercial
units are located adjacent to the complex along
with an underground garage with more than 120
parking spaces. Thanks to thermal insulation and
recovery systems, the apartments only rarely need
to be heated actively. The ventilation system ensures a healthy interior climate. The interior furnishings feature low-emission building materials and
mostly certified wood.
■
Mannheim: Palais auf den Planken
Mannheim O 4 Projektgesellschaft, a wholly owned
subsidiary of LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH,
is constructing the »Palais auf den Planken« business
and office building in the Mannheim pedestrian precinct. The building has been awarded a preliminary
silver certificate by DGNB. Durable materials such as
sandstone and slate are being used in the reconstruction of the facade of the former bank building,
which was constructed in 1923. The well-preserved
gates and railings will be re-installed after the completion of the renovation work. Parts of the lower
floors and the floor slab as well as the exterior walls
made from reinforced concrete have been retained.
Passage ways have been reduced to a minimum to
Activities of the LBBW Immobilien
Group.
A large number of sustainable real estate and community development projects are carried out under the
auspices of the LBBW Immobilien Group – from constructing environmentally friendly residential communities
to developing concepts to improve the energy efficiency
of entire cities.
LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH
LBBW Immobilien Management GmbH’s development
company specializes in designing and building sustainable residential complexes and commercial space. As a
service provider, the company provides its expertise in
sustainability, revitalization project management and
efficiency improvements. LBBW Immobilien Development GmbH is a member of Deutsche Gesellschaft für
Nachhaltiges Bauen e. V. (DGNB – German Sustainable
Building Council). Many of our projects are DGNB-certified. In this connection, DGNB evaluates the overall
sustainability of the property over the entire building
lifecycle according to around 40 different criteria
measuring environmental, economic, sociocultural as
well as functional, technical and process quality.
128
RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT | ENVIRONMENT
ensure high floor area efficiency. Work on the building is being executed on a low-emissions basis in
accordance with DGNB specifications. Special efforts
have been taken to reduce the noise and dust emissions caused by this urban construction site. The
building comprises four retail levels with office
space of around 2,400 m2 and around 1,200 m2
for rental.
LBBW Immobilien Kommunalentwicklung GmbH
As a company of LBBW Immobilien Management
GmbH, the German Association of Cities and the savings bank organization, this Stuttgart-based company
is the point of contact for municipalities and the state
of Baden-Württemberg for all issues concerning urban
planning, urban renewal, land repurposing and construction site and land development. This municipal
center of excellence provides planning and consulting
services, spearheads renovation and development projects and invests in projects. LBBW Immobilien Kommunalentwicklung GmbH operates in 440 cities and
municipalities.
LBBW Immobilien Kommunalentwicklung GmbH is currently working on the following project, for example:
■
Mannheim: Revitalization of the SEL site
The former office and production facilities of SELAlcatel in Mannheim, Käfertal, had for many years
been in a poor state of repair that did not conform
to contemporary standards, resulting in high vacancy rates, following the former owner’s insolvency.
LBBW Immobilien Kommunalentwicklung GmbH was
instructed by the new owner to modernize the site
in line with sustainability requirements and to market it. Between 2008 and 2010, the building complex
with a lettable floor area of 18,000 m2 was provided
with integrated heat insulation and new windows,
reducing heating requirements by around one-third.
Today, the building is profitable with an occupancy
rate of over 90 %.
129
GRI G4 Index.
Note:
LBBW engaged AGIMUS GmbH Umweltgutachterorganisation
und Beratungsgesellschaft to review the Sustainability Report
2015 with the 2015 Consolidated Environmental Statement in
terms of materiality, transparency and comparability (see
Audit Opinion on p. 134 ff.).
Data which was not necessary for the »In accordance with« –
»Core« option selection or which related to aspects which
were not considered to be material are not included in the
index.
GRI G4
GRI G4
Efficient. Consistent.
Contents
Page
General Standard Disclosures
Strategy and Analysis
Statement from most senior decision-maker
G4-3
Name of organization
Page 6 – 8
Page 4, 9 f.
G4-4
Primary brands, products and services
Page 9 f.
Organizational profile
G4-5
Organization’s headquarters
Page 9 f.
G4-6
Number and names of countries in which the company
operates or which are relevant for the Sustainability
Report
Page 4, Country
by Country
Report 2014,
Page 4
G4-7
Nature of ownership, legal form
Page 9 f.
G4-8
Markets served including geographic breakdown,
sectors served, type of customers and beneficiaries
Page 9 f.
G4-9
Size of organization including total number of
employees, total number of operations, net sales, total
capitalization broken down in terms of debt and equity,
quantity of products or services provided
Page. 9 f., 2014
LBBW Annual
Report, inside
cover page,
page 125 ff.
G4-10
· Total number of employees by employment contract
Page 78 – 85
and gender
•Caption
Total number of permanent employees by
employment type and gender
• Total workforce by employee and supervised workers
and by gender
• Total workforce by region and gender
adopted
a Bank-wide
•LBBW
Report has
whether
a substantial
portion of theMission Statement as a
organization’s work is performed by workers who are
set
of
rules
governing
our collective work and actions.
legally recognized as self-employed, or by individuals
other than employees or supervised workers,
including employees and supervised employees of
Our
commitment to sustainability is documented in
contractors
• Significant fluctuations in employee numbers
our Mission Statement: As a company with regional
Percentage of total employees covered by collective
Page 87 f., 97
roots, we
are committed to fulfilling our responsibilibargaining
agreements.
G4-12
Organization’s
chain
ties. We dosuppy
business
G4-13
Any significant changes during the reporting period
mannertheand
advocatesize,
social
issues.
regarding
organization’s
structure,
ownership
or its supply chain
Page 10
G4-14
Whether and how the precautionary approach or
Corporate
Governance
principle
is addressed
by the organization
Page 55 f.,
61 ff., 116, 120
G4-15
Externally
developed
economic,
environmental and
Page 44 – 46
LBBW has
adopted
a Bank-wide
social charters, principles or other initiatives to which
54 f.
Mission
Statement
as
a
set
of
rules
governing
the organization subscribes or which it endorses
G4-16
130
Contents
Page
Identified
material
aspects and boundaries
LBBW has
adopted
a Bank-wide
• Entities included in the organization’s consolidated
4, 2014
Missionfinancial
Statement
as a set of rules governing Page
statements or equivalent documents
LBBW Annual
• Report whether
entity
includedOur
in thecommitment
Report,
our collective
work any
and
actions.
to
organization’s consolidated financial statements or
Page 241 ff.
sustainability
is
documented
in
our
Mission
Statement:
equivalent documents is not covered by the report
G4-18
• Process for
defining
the report
content
the committed
Page 21 – 28
As a company
with
regional
roots,
weandare
Aspect Boundaries
to fulfilling
our
responsibilities.
We
do
business
in
an
· How the organization has implemented the Reporting
Principles
for
Defining
Report
Content
environmentally friendly manner and
G4-19
Material aspects identified in the process for defining
Page 26 – 28
LBBW has
reportadopted
content a Bank-wide
G4-20
ForStatement
each material as
Aspect,
report
Aspect
Boundary
Page 4, 22 – 25,
Mission
a set
of the
rules
governing
within the organization
28
our collective
work and actions. Our commitment
to
G4-21
For each material Aspect, report the Aspect Boundary
Page 4, 22 – 25,
outside
the
organization
28
sustainability is documented in our Mission Statement:
New: Materiality
G4-22
Effect of any restatements of information provided in
As a company
with regional roots, we are committed
Analysis, page
previous reports, and the reasons for such restate26 –an
28
ments. our responsibilities. We do business in
to fulfilling
G4-23
Significant changes from previous reporting periods in No material
environmentally
friendly manner and
the Scope and Aspect Boundaries
changes
G4-17
G4-1
G4-11
environmentally friendly manner and
47 – 49
in an environmentallyPage
friendly
Memberships
of associations
(suchactions.
as industryOur commitment
Page 44 f. to
our collective
work and
associations) and national or international advocacy
sustainability
is documented
organizations
in which
the organization: in our Mission Statement:
• holds a position on the governance body
As a company with regional roots, we are committed
• participates in projects or committees
•to
provides
substantive
funding beyond routine
fulfilling
our responsibilities.
We do business in an
membership dues
Stakeholder
engagement
LBBW has
adopted
a Bank-wide
Stakeholder groups engaged by the organization
Page 4, 26, 28,
Mission Statement as a set of rules governing 37 – 39
G4-25
Basis for identification
selection Our
of stakeholders
Page
our collective
work andand
actions.
commitment
to4, 26, 28,
with whom to engage
37 – 39
sustainability
is documented in our Mission Statement:
G4-26
Approach to stakeholder engagement, including
Page 4, 26, 28,
frequency ofwith
engagement
by type
and bywe
stakeholder
37 – 39
As a company
regional
roots,
are committed
group, and an indication of whether any of the
to fulfilling
our was
responsibilities.
We do
business
engagement
undertaken specifically
as part
of the in an
report preparation
processmanner and advocate social
environmentally
friendly
G4-27
Key topics and concerns that have been raised through
Page 26 – 28
issues.stakeholder
LBBW has
adopted a Bank-wide Mission Stateengagement
ment as a set of rules governing our collective work
Report profile
and actions.
We do business in an environmentally
G4-28
Reporting period
Page 4
friendly
manner and advocate social issues. LBBW
has
G4-29
Date of most recent previous report
Page 4
adopted
a Bank-wide
G4-30
Reporting
cycle
Page 4
G4-24
G4-31
Contact point for questions regarding the report or its
contents
Page 137
G4-32
Selected »In accordance« option, core or comprehensive Page 4
G4-33
Assurance of the report
G4-34
Governance structure
Page 134 ff.
Corporate governance
Page 9 f., 20 f.,
2014 LBBW
Annual Report
2014, page 3 – 18
GRI G4
Contents
Page
GRI G4
Contents
Page
G4-38
Composition of the highest governance body and its
committees
LBBW.de ➝
About us ➝
Supervisory
Board
G4-EN6
Reduction of energy consumption
Page 116, 120
G4-39
Chair of the highest governance body
LBBW.de ➝
About us ➝
Supervisory
Board
Ethics and Integrity
G4-56
Values, principles, standards and norms of behavior
Aspect: Water
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 28
G4-EN8
Total water withdrawal by source
Page 127
G4-EN9
Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal
of water
Page 127
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 28,
116, 120,
122 – 124
Page 114
Aspect: Emissions
Page 11 – 19, 50
Specific Standard Disclosures
G4-EN15
Direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 1)
G4-EN16
Energy-related indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Page 114
(Scope 2)
G4-EN17
Other indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
(Scope 3)
Category: Economic
Aspect: Economic performance
G4-DMA
G4-EC1
G4-EC2
Management approach
Page 6 – 8, 26,
2014 LBBW
Annual Report
Direct economic value generated and distributed
(revenue, operating costs, employee wages and
benefits, payments to providers of capital, payments
to government, investments in the company, economic
value retained)
Page 10, 103 f.,
2014 LBBW
Annual Report,
122 ff. 1
Financial implications and other risks and opportunities
for the organization’s activities due to climate change
Page 19, 28,
62 – 64, 69 ff.
Aspect: Market presence
G4-DMA
G4-EC5
Management approach
Page 97 f.,
2014 LBBW
Remuneration
Report,
page 8 ff.
G4-EN19
Reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
Page 112 – 114
G4-EN20
Emissions of ozone-depleting substances
Page 115
G4-EN21
NOx, SOx and other significant air emissions
Page 115
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28,
125 – 127
G4-EN22
Total water discharge by quality and destination
Footnote 2
on page 109
G4-EN23
Total weight of waste by type and disposal method
Page 125 – 127
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f.,
49 – 52
G4-EN29
Monetary value of significant fines and total number of
non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with
environmental laws and regulations
Page 52
G4-DMA
Management approach
G4-EN30
Significant environmental impacts of transporting
Page 122 – 124
products and other goods and materials for the
organization’s operations, and transporting members of
the workforce
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 28
G4-EN31
Total environmental protection expenditures and
investments by type
2
Aspect: Effluents and Waste
Aspect: Compliance
Ratios of standard entry level wage by gender compared Page 93, 97 f.
to local minimum wage at significant locations of
operation
Category: Ecological
Aspect: Materials
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 28,
121 f.
G4-EN1
Materials used by weight or volume
Page 109
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 114
Aspect: Transport
Page 22 f., 28,
122 – 124
Aspect: Energy
G4-EN3
1 As
Energy consumption within the organization
Page 22 f., 28,
116, 120
Page 109, 111,
116 – 119
Aspect: Overall
a rule, LBBW does not make any contributions to political parties or politicians and makes no payments to governments.
spent around EUR 1 million on waste disposal in 2014.
2 LBBW
131
GRI G4
Contents
Page
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f.,
47 – 49
G4-EN32
Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using
environmental criteria
Page 47
GRI G4
Contents
Page
Aspect: Supplier Environmental Assessment
Human rights
Aspect: Investment
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 28,
68
G4-HR1
Total number and percentage of significant investment
agreements and contracts that include human rights
clauses or that underwent human rights screening
Page 56, 68
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28, 92 ff.
G4-HR3
Total number of incidents of discrimination and
corrective actions taken
No incidents
reported in
2014.
G4-DMA
Management approach
G4-HR5
Operations and suppliers identified as having significant Page 47 – 49, 55
risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to
contribute to the effective abolition of child labor
G4-DMA
Management approach
G4-HR6
Operations and suppliers identified as having significant Page 48
risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and
measures to contribute to the elimination of all forms of
forced or compulsory labor
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28
G4-HR8
Total number of incidents of violations involving rights
of indigenous people and actions taken
No incidents
reported in
2014.
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28, 55
G4-HR9
Total number and percentage of operations that have
been subject to human rights reviews or impact
assessments
Page 55
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 28,
47 – 49
G4-HR10
Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using
human rights criteria
Page 47
Aspect: Environmental Grievance Mechanisms
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 73 f., 24 f.
G4-EN34
Number of grievances about environmental impacts
filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance
mechanisms
3
Aspect: Non-discrimination
Category: Social
Labor practices and decent work
Aspect: Employment
G4-DMA
G4-LA1
Management approach
Total number and rates of new employee hires and
employee turnover by age group, gender and region
Page 24 f.,
76 ff.
Aspect: Child labor
Page 80, 83, 84
Aspect: Occupational health and safety
G4-DMA
Management approach
G4-LA5
Page 86 – 88, 97
Percentage of total workforce represented in formal
joint management–worker health and safety committees
that help monitor and advise on occupational health and
safety programs
Page 28, 86 f.
G4-LA6
Type of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, Page 84, 87 f.
lost days and absenteeism, and total number of
work-related fatalities, by region and by gender
G4-DMA
Management approach
Aspect: Forced or compulsory labor
Page 22 f., 28,
47 – 49, 55, 68
Aspect: Indigenous rights
Aspect: Training and continuing education
Page 24 f.,
89 – 91
G4-LA10
Programs for skills management and lifelong learning
that support the continued employability of employees
and assist them in managing career endings
Page 89 – 92
G4-LA11
Percentage of employees receiving regular performance
and career development reviews, by gender and by
employee category
Page 83
Aspect: Assessment
Aspect: Diversity and equal opportunity
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28, 92 – 94
G4-LA12
Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of
employees per employee category according to gender,
age group, minority group membership and other
indicators of diversity
Page 78 – 81, 93
LBBW.de ➝
About us ➝
Supervisory
Board
Aspect: Supplier human rights assessment
Aspect: Equal remuneration for women and men
Aspect: Human rights grievance mechanisms
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28, 92 – 94
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 28, 73 f.
G4-LA13
Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to
men by employee category, by significant locations of
operation
Page 93
G4-HR12
Number of grievances about environmental impacts
filed, addressed and resolved through formal grievance
mechanisms
4
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f.,
47 ff.
G4-LA14
Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using
labor practices criteria
Page 47
Aspect: Supplier assessment for labor practices
3
Page 22 f., 28,
47 – 49, 55, 68
Society
Aspect: Anti-corruption
No grievances about environmental impacts were filed through formal grievance mechanisms during the reporting period.
132
GRI G4
Contents
Page
GRI G4
Contents
Page
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f.,
49 ff.
G4-DMA
(FS5)
Page 38 f.
G4-SO5
Confirmed incidents of corruption and actions taken
Page 51
Interactions with clients/investees and business
partners regarding environmental and social risks and
opportunities
FS6
Percentage of the portfolio for business lines by specific Page 71 – 73
region, size and by sector
FS7
Monetary value of products and services designed to
deliver a specific social benefit for each business line
broken down by purpose
Page 65, 71 – 73
FS8
Monetary value of products and services designed to
deliver a specific environmental benefit for each
business line broken down by purpose
Page 65, 71 – 73
G4-DMA
(FS9)
Coverage and frequency of audits to assess implementation of environmental and social policies and risk
assessment procedures
FS10
Percentage and number of companies held in the
institution’s portfolio with which the reporting
organization has interacted on environmental or social
issues
Page 54 f.
FS11
Percentage of assets subject to positive and negative
environmental or social screening
Page 65
G4-DMA
(FS12)
Voting policy(ies) applied to environmental or social
issues for shares over which the reporting organization
holds the right to vote shares or advises on voting
Page 54 f.
FS13
Access points in low-population or economically
disadvantaged areas by type ( branch, self-service)
Page 9 f.,
LBBW.de ➝
About us ➝
Company
profile
FS14
Initiatives to improve access to financial services for
disadvantaged people
Page 75, 99
G4-DMA
(FS15)
Policies for the fair design and sale of financial products Page 55, 60
and services
G4-DMA
(FS16)
Initiatives to enhance financial literacy by type of
beneficiary
Product responsibility
Aspect: Product and service labeling
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f.,
73 – 75
G4-PR5
Results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction
Page 74 f.
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 55
G4-PR7
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with
regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing
communications, including advertising, promotion and
sponsorship, by type of outcomes
Page 55
Aspect: Marketing Communications
Audit
Aspect: Customer privacy
G4-DMA
Management approach
Page 22 f., 52
G4-PR8
Total number of substantiated complaints regarding
breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer
data
Page 52
Disclosures for the financial services industry
Product portfolio
G4-DMA
(FS1)
Description of policies with specific environmental and
social components applied to business lines
Page 14 f.,
17 – 19
G4-DMA
(FS2)
Description of procedures for assessing and screening
environmental and social risks in business lines
Page 55 f.
G4-DMA
(FS3)
Description of processes for monitoring clients’
implementation of and compliance with environmental
and social requirements included in agreements or
transactions
Page 68 f.
G4-DMA
(FS4)
Description of process(es) for improving staff competen- Page 38, 50
cy to implement the environmental and social policies
and procedures as applied to business lines
Page 46 f.
Active ownership
Local communities
Product and service labeling
4
Page 38 f., 90,
101 f.
No grievances about violations of human rights were filed through formal grievance mechanisms.
133
Audit Opinion.
LBBW engaged AGIMUS GmbH Umweltgutachterorganisation
und Beratungsgesellschaft to review the Sustainability Report
2015 with 2015 Consolidated Environmental Statement in
terms of materiality, transparency and comparability and to
audit the management system in accordance with ISO 14001
and EMAS. We evaluated the effectiveness of the management systems, conducted an extensive audit on site in Stuttgart, Germany, and performed a review based on the inspection of documents and interviews.
Management Systems
Compared to the 2013 and 2014 Sustainability Reports, the
Report and underlying management methods indicate that
further progress has been made. The following aspects
should be mentioned, in part also in line with the previous
years:
a.) As in prior years, the measures derived from the Guidelines resulted in sustainability principles being anchored
even more deeply in the business processes of the Bank.
The operational details of the Guidelines currently being
worked on (Guidelines for Sustainability in the Investment
Business, Guidelines for Sustainability in the Lending Business) will lead to further progress in this process.
b.) Key energy and resource usage figures (electricity,
heating, company travel, water) per employee and square
meter were reduced in previous years, meaning that the
previously planned improvement has now definitely been
achieved. The fact that there has been a slight increase in
relative electricity consumption indicates that further
work is required on improving efficiency. Packages of
measures have already been identified.
c.) The supplier portal, which combines registration, the
supplier information questionnaire, product group definitions, product approval and supplier evaluations, will lead
to improvements in the value chain in the long term.
d.) Sustainability was addressed at an early stage in the
contracts for the outsourcing of IT to a service provider,
since this involves major energy issues. These include
using a sustainability clause for suppliers and purchasing
green electricity, for example.
e) The key performance indicators for human resources
allow personnel development to be measured in the
context of the Bank’s sustainability strategy.
134
The management systems of the various functions are presented
effectively. LBBW’s activities as part of the UNEP Finance Initiative and adherence to the Principles for Responsible Investment
(PRI) indicate a clear voluntary commitment. Above all, the Guidelines for Sustainability ensure that sustainability criteria are duly
incorporated in main business process. The development of
operational specifics for the Guidelines for Sustainability provide
assurance of the integration of sustainability criteria into the core
business processes of the Bank. The development of operational
specifics for the Guidelines for Sustainability in the banking business will be advanced using the principle proven effective in the
case of banned weapons (no-go criteria, yellow criteria, green
criteria) for selected industries to provide a substantive underpinning for the business principles To this end, already existing
critical industry-country combinations have been incorporated in
an overall country and product matrix, so that sustainability can
be taken into consideration systematically, particularly in international activities. In our view, the Bank’s approach should be expanded step by step in consultation with other institutions which
are also positioning themselves as pioneers in sustainability.
We consider the key performance indicators (KPI) for measuring
the success of the implementation of the Guidelines in the business segments to be an appropriate instrument.
Our recommendation to communicate the question »Why does
the Bank undertake sustainability management activities?« to the
workforce more effectively remains unchanged. We also repeat
our recommendation that the specific life experiences of individual employees be tied in more explicitly with sustainability management; the use of the e-learning tool was an initial step in this
direction that should continue.
The Sustainability Program is detailed and comprehensive. There
are various small-scale activities bringing about continuous improvement in technical bank operations beyond the goals and
measures described in the Program that are no longer mentioned in the Program. The introduction of new measures – particularly with regard to banking products and the Bank’s environment – indicates that LBBW is addressing stakeholder concerns.
We again recommend anticipating existing conflicts of interest
between short-term business success and sustainability criteria
in implementing the Guidelines.
We are pleased to see that reductions in CO2 emissions (in
absolute and relative terms) are continuing, especially in view
of the fact that, after the first step of purchasing green electricity was taken several years ago, this is now accomplished
with true reductions in consumption and improvements in
energy efficiency. This 'carbon offset' is not available to all
groups in society and, for this reason, it has been noted in
the Sustainability Program that further energy efficiency improvements will be the main focus of activities in this area in
the future. The efforts in this regard – particularly projects
involving building technical systems and the conceptual integration of green IT, including by the service provider hired –
remain very commendable.
In terms of communication, the division of greenhouse gas
emissions into Scope 1, Scope 2 and Scope 3 in accordance
with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol marks a clear advance.
Environmental Verifier’s Declaration on Verification and
Validation Activities at LBBW (Pursuant to Annex VII of
EMAS III)
The undersigned, Dr. Ralf Utermöhlen, EMAS environmental
verifier with registration number DE-V-0080, licensed for Banking (NACE Code WZ [German Classification of Economic Activities] 2008: 64.19), declares to have verified whether the LBBW
sites in Stuttgart, Germany, consisting of the following buildings:
Am Hauptbahnhof 2 (Bldg. 1), 70173 Stuttgart,
Am Hauptbahnhof 7+9 (Bldg. 2), 70173 Stuttgart,
Am Hauptbahnhof 11 (Bldg. 3), 70173 Stuttgart,
Am Hauptbahnhof 8 (Bldg. 4), 70173 Stuttgart,
Pariser Platz 1 (Bldg. 5), 70173 Stuttgart,
Pariser Platz 1 (Bldg. 6), 70173 Stuttgart,
Königstrasse 3, 70173 Stuttgart,
Fritz-Elsas-Strasse 31 (Bollwerk), 70173 Stuttgart,
Kleiner Schlossplatz 11, 70173 Stuttgart,
and the building at Augustaanlage 33, 68161 Mannheim,
meet all requirements of Regulation (EC) No 1221/2009 of
the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 November
2009 on the voluntary participation by organizations in a
Community eco-management and audit scheme (EMAS).
By signing this declaration, I declare that:
■ the verification and validation have been carried out in full
compliance with the requirements of Regulation (EC) No.
1221/2009,
■ the outcome of the verification and validation confirms that
there is no evidence of non-compliance with applicable legal
requirements relating to the environment,
■ the data and information of the Environmental Statement of
the sites provide a reliable, credible and correct view of all the
sites’ activities within the scope mentioned in the Environmental Statement.
This document is not equivalent to EMAS registration. EMAS registration can only be granted by a Competent Body under Regulation (EC) No 1221/2009.
This document may not be used as a separate instrument for
public communications.
Materiality and Transparency
In preparing the Report, the relevant issues were weighted for
materiality, and upstream and downstream organizational units
were taken into account. It contains all of the information that
should be viewed as material in compliance with the principles
of materiality, the sustainability context and the inclusion of
stakeholders.
Our audit findings indicate that no information was omitted
from the Report that could possibly influence assessments or
decisions by stakeholders or that would reflect important economic, environmental and societal/social effects. The Report
therefore discloses positive and, if any, negative events.
In connection with the adoption of the new reporting standard
GRI G4, a materiality analysis was performed in the form of a
stakeholder workshop. Initially, only the Bank’s own employees
participated in the materiality analysis. This is clearly a shortcoming but has already been acknowledged as such by the Bank.
Third parties – such as customers and owners as well as critical
outsiders (NGOs) – are to be incorporated in the materiality analysis step by step over the coming years.
135
The information included in the Report comprises all of the
important activities and events revealed during the audit that
took place during the period under review along with reliable
estimates of the effects of past events on the future, if these
effects are foreseeable, and if they could become inevitable
or irreversible.
Compliance guidelines and control mechanisms continue to
be presented very well. The description of the indicator FS 14
(initiatives to improve access to financial services for disadvantaged people) fell short of the Bank’s actual activities in
this area; this is to be remedied in future reports. LBBW’s
commitment to integrating sustainability into its core business is exemplary. For core business segments (renewable
energy project financing, loan decisions, investment products), the environmental and social risks, as well as LBBW’s
management systems in this area, are presented very well.
For other areas of the core business (microfinance, financing
of projects other than renewable energy projects, increase in
assets under management with a sustainability focus), statements on this subject would be a valuable addition to future
reports. The breakdown of project finance by region and
business line is commendable. Case studies would be a valuable addition to future reports.
The Report again contains a very good description of upper
management’s voluntary commitment to complying with the
sustainability policy and the human resources development
opportunities with respect to sustainability, which indicates a
high level of corporate ethics and transparency in terms of
value creation in LBBW’s domestic business.
The reporting on regional aspects is outstanding (principal
bank concept) and has improved over previous reports with
respect to the relevant international control mechanisms
(e. g. human rights clauses beyond the procurement process-
136
es, violation of the rights of indigenous peoples) as a result of
the inclusion of details of supplier contracts. We again recommend further development of the corresponding tools, while
acknowledging that actual implementation can only be accomplished in the long term.
Comparability and Confirmation »in accordance« with the
guidelines
LBBW has provided the necessary standard disclosures stipulated
by the G4 principles for sustainability reporting under the Global
Reporting Initiative (GRI) and satisfied the »core« of the »in accordance« option. The new standard no longer provides for the
designation of an application level (B+ under GRI G3 in previous
years). The report is evidence of LBBW’s voluntary commitment
to continual improvement and points to the fact that LBBW has
reached a level comparable to its main peers. The integration of
the validated Environmental Statement within the Report is commendable, and the Report is generally informative and user
friendly.
Braunschweig, 8 October 2015
Dr. Ralf Utermöhlen (Environmental Verifier, DE-V-0080)
AGIMUS GmbH Umweltgutachterorganisation & Beratungsgesellschaft (DE-V-0003)
Am Alten Bahnhof 6
38122 Braunschweig, Germany
Contacts.
Dr. Gerhard Fischer
Department Head
Corporate Sustainability and Health
Phone +49 711 127-42563
Fax
+49 711 127-6642563
[email protected]
Silvia Weiss
Head of Sustainability Group
Phone +49 711 127-42637
Fax
+49 711 127-6642637
[email protected]
Thomas Derr
Phone +49 711 127-77100
Fax
+49 711 127-6677100
[email protected]
Benjamin Henle
Phone +49 711 127-74540
Fax
+49 711 127-6674540
[email protected]
Elke Hauser
Phone +49 711 127-45886
Fax
+49 711 127-6645886
[email protected]
Stephanie Neth
Phone +49 711 127-47558
Fax
+49 711 127-6647558
[email protected]
Publishing Information.
Publisher
Landesbank Baden-Württemberg
Am Hauptbahnhof 2
70173 Stuttgart, Germany
www.LBBW.de
[email protected]
Design and production:
Landesbank Baden-Württemberg
Image processing, typesetting
and final artwork:
Meyle + Müller GmbH + Co. KG
Maximilianstraße 104
75172 Pforzheim, Germany
137
Landesbank Baden-Württemberg
Head offices
Stuttgart
70144 Stuttgart, Germany
Am Hauptbahnhof 2
70173 Stuttgart
Phone +49 711 127-0
Fax +49 711 127-43544
www.LBBW.de
[email protected]
Karlsruhe
76245 Karslruhe
Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 4
76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
Phone +49 721 142-0
Fax +49 721 142-23012
www.LBBW.de
[email protected]
Mannheim
P. O. Box 10 03 52
68003 Mannheim, Germany
Augustaanlage 33
68165 Mannheim
Phone +49 621 428-0
Fax +49 621 428-72591
www.LBBW.de
[email protected]
Mainz
55098 Mainz
Grosse Bleiche 54 – 56
55116 Mainz, Germany
Phone +49 6131 64-37800
Fax +49 6131 64-35701
www.LBBW.de
[email protected]
Landesbank Baden-Württemberg

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